9553 – 10837

AC (Potts) n. 9553 sRef Ex@25 @31 S0′ 9553. And its flowers. That this signifies the memory- knowledges of truth, is evident from the signification of “flowers,” as being the memory-knowledges of truth. “Flowers” have this signification, because flowers are growths which precede, and in their manner produce, the fruits and seeds; for, as is known, trees and plants blossom before they bear fruit. The case is the same with man in respect to intelligence and wisdom. The memory-knowledges of truth precede, and in their manner produce with man, the things of wisdom; for they serve as objects to his rational, and thus as means for growing wise. It is for this reason that the memory-knowledges of truth are as flowers; and the good of life, which is the good of wisdom, is as fruit. As all things in the spiritual world bear relation to such things as are in man, for the reason that heaven bears relation to a man, and corresponds to each and all things with man, therefore also all things in the natural world have a correspondence, a representation, and a signification in accordance with their agreement with such things as are in man (see n. 9496). From this it can now be seen why “flowers” signify the memory-knowledges of truth, and in general truths; and why “fruits,” and likewise “seeds,” signify goods.
sRef Isa@40 @8 S2′ sRef Isa@40 @6 S2′ sRef Isa@28 @1 S2′ sRef Isa@40 @7 S2′ sRef Isa@5 @24 S2′ sRef Nahum@1 @4 S2′ sRef Isa@27 @6 S2′ [2] That “flowers” denote the memory-knowledges of truth, and in general truths, is evident from the following passages:
Their root shall be as rottenness, and their flower as dust; because they have rejected the law of Jehovah Zebaoth, and despised the discourse of the Holy One of Israel (Isa. 5:24).
Jacob shall cause those to come to take root; Israel shall blossom and flower; so that the faces of the world shall be filled with produce (Isa. 27:6).
Woe to the drunkards of Ephraim, and to the fading flower of his glory and comeliness (Isa. 28:1).
“Drunkards” denote those who reason from falsities (see n. 1072); “Ephraim” denotes the intellectual of the church, here perverted (n. 5354, 6222, 6234, 6238, 6267); “glory,” truth Divine (n. 4809, 5922, 8267, 8427, 9429); from which it is plain that a “flower” denotes the memory-knowledge through which is truth. Again:
The grass is withered, the flower faded, the people is grass; but the word of our God abideth forever (Isa. 40:7, 8).
The flower of Lebanon languisheth (Nah. 1:4);
where also “the flower” denotes memory-knowledges as means for growing wise.
sRef Dan@4 @12 S3′ sRef Dan@4 @14 S3′ sRef Dan@4 @11 S3′ sRef Dan@4 @10 S3′ sRef Dan@4 @13 S3′ [3] In Daniel:
Nebuchadnezzar saw in a dream, and behold a tree in the midst of the earth, the height thereof great, the leaf thereof beautiful, and the flower thereof much; the beast of the field had shade under it, and the birds of heaven dwelt in the branches thereof, and all flesh was fed. But the Holy One from heaven, crying aloud, said, Hew down the tree, cut off his branches, shake off his leaf, scatter his flower; let the beast of the field flee from under it, and the birds from its branches (Dan. 4:10, 12-14).
By “the tree” and “the height thereof” is signified the increase of the religiosity signified by “Babel,” which is holy in externals, but profane in internals (n. 1182, 1283, 1295, 1304-1308, 1321, 1322, 1326); “the leaf” denotes memory-truth in general (n. 885); “the flower,” the memory-knowledge of truth insofar as it serves as a means for growing wise, but here insofar as it serves as a means for growing insane, because it is said that “the flower shall be scattered;” “the beast of the field” denotes those who are in affections of good; and in the opposite sense, those who are in affections of evil (n. 45, 46, 142, 143, 246, 714, 715, 719, 776, 1823, 2179, 2180, 3218, 3519, 5198, 7523, 9090, 9280); but “the birds of heaven” denotes those who are in affections of truth, and in the opposite sense those who are in affections of falsity (n. 3219, 5149, 7441); therefore it is said that “under the shade of that tree dwelt the beast of the field,” and that “in its branches dwelt the birds of heaven,” and that “all flesh was fed;” and afterward that “the beast of the field should flee from under it, and the birds from its branches.”

AC (Potts) n. 9554 sRef Ex@25 @31 S0′ 9554. Shall be out of it. That this signifies that they shall be from the spiritual which is from celestial good, is evident from the signification of “the lampstand,” out of which the pomegranates and flowers were to be, as being the Divine spiritual which is from the Divine celestial (of which above, n. 9548). Hence it is evident that by “shall be out of it” is signified from the spiritual which is from celestial good.

AC (Potts) n. 9555 sRef Ex@25 @32 S0′ 9555. And there shall be six reeds going out of the sides thereof. That this signifies all things of truth from good in the complex, is evident from the signification of “six,” as being all things in the complex (see n. 3960, 7973, 8148); and from the signification of “reeds going out of the sides,” as being truths from good. For by “the reeds out of the lampstand” is signified the like as by the arms and hands of a man, because each and all things in nature bear relation to the human form, and have their signification therefrom (n. 9496, 9553). (The “arms” and “hands” in man correspond to truths from good, and to the derivative power, n. 878, 4931-4937, 5327, 5328, 6292, 6947, 7188, 7189, 7205, 7518, 7673, 8050, 8153, 8281, 9025, 9133.) From all this it is evident that by “the six reeds going out of the sides” are signified all things of truth from good in the complex.

AC (Potts) n. 9556 sRef Ex@25 @32 S0′ 9556. Three reeds of the lampstand out of the one side there of, and three reeds of the lampstand out of the other side thereof. That hereby is signified full in respect to good and truth, is evident from the signification of “three,” as being what is full (see n. 2788, 4495, 7715, 9198); from the signification of “the reeds of the lampstand,” as being truths from good and the consequent power (of which above, n. 9555); and from the signification of “out of the one side, and out of the other side,” as being from good and the derivative truth. For by the things on the right side of the body are signified goods, and by those on the left side the truths thence derived, as is the case with the right and left sides of the face, the right and left eyes, the right and left ears, the right and left feet, and in like manner with all other things in the body.

AC (Potts) n. 9557 sRef Ex@25 @33 S0′ 9557. Three almond-shaped cups. That this signifies full in respect to memory-knowledges from good, is evident from the signification of “three,” as being what is full (see just above, n. 9556); from the signification of “cups,” as being memory-truths that are from the good of charity (n. 5120); and from the signification of “almonds,” as being the goods of life that correspond to the truths of interior natural good (n. 5622). From this it is evident that by “three almond-shaped cups” is signified what is full in respect to memory-truths from good.

AC (Potts) n. 9558 sRef Ex@25 @33 S0′ 9558. In one reed. That this signifies the power of truth from good, is evident from the signification of a “reed,” as being truth from good and the consequent power (of which above, n. 9555).

AC (Potts) n. 9559 sRef Ex@25 @33 S0′ 9559. A pomegranate and a flower. That this signifies the memory-knowledge of good and of truth, is evident from the signification of “a pomegranate,” as being the memory-knowledge of good (see n. 9552); and from the signification of “a flower,” as being the memory-knowledge of truth (n. 9553).

AC (Potts) n. 9560 sRef Ex@25 @33 S0′ 9560. And three almond-shaped cups in the other reed, a pomegranate and a flower. That this signifies the like things as just above (n. 9557-9559), is evident without explication.

AC (Potts) n. 9561 sRef Ex@25 @33 S0′ 9561. So for the six reeds going out of the lampstand. That this signifies the power of truth from good in respect to all things in the spiritual heaven, is evident from the signification of “six,” as being all things in the complex (see above, n. 9555); from the signification of “the reeds,” as being truths from good and the consequent power (n. 9555, 9558); and from the signification of “the lampstand,” as being the spiritual heaven (n. 9548). From this it is evident that by “the six reeds going out of the lampstand” is signified the power of truth from good in respect to all things in the spiritual heaven.

AC (Potts) n. 9562 sRef Ex@25 @34 S0′ 9562. And in the lampstand. That this signifies the middle of it through which there is conjunction, and from which are powers, is evident from the signification of “the lampstand,” as being the spiritual heaven (see n. 9548), but here, because the middle part is meant from which the six reeds went out, by which reeds are signified powers (n. 9558), therefore the middle is signified through which there is conjunction, and from which are powers.

AC (Potts) n. 9563 sRef Ex@25 @34 S0′ 9563. Four almond-shaped cups. That this signifies the memory-knowledges of truth from good, is evident from the signification of “four,” as being conjunction (see n. 8877); and from the signification of “almond-shaped cups,” as being memory-knowledges from good (of which above, n. 9557).

AC (Potts) n. 9564 sRef Ex@25 @34 S0′ 9564. Its pomegranates, and its flowers. That this signifies the memory-knowledges of good and of truth, is evident from the signification of “pomegranates,” as being memory-knowledges of good (see n. 9552); and from the signification of “flowers” as being memory-knowledges of truth (n. 9553).

AC (Potts) n. 9565 sRef Ex@25 @35 S0′ 9565. And a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under too reeds out of it. That this signifies the memory-knowledge of good for all the several truths, is evident from the signification of “a pomegranate,” as being memory-knowledge of good (see n. 9552); and from the signification of the “reeds,” as being truths from good (n. 9555). Its being said three times signifies everything, and in the internal sense complete conjunction; for by “three” is signified what is complete (n. 2788, 4495, 7715, 9198); and by “two” is signified conjunction (n. 1686, 5194, 8423).

AC (Potts) n. 9566 sRef Ex@25 @35 S0′ 9566. For the six reeds going out of the lampstand, signifies the power of truth from good in respect to all things in the spiritual heaven (as above, n. 9561).

AC (Potts) n. 9567 sRef Ex@25 @36 S0′ 9567. Their pomegranates and their reeds shall be out of it; all of it. That this signifies that the memory-knowledges of good and the powers shall be from the Divine spiritual which is from the Lord, is evident from the signification of “pomegranates,” as being memory-knowledges of good (see n. 9552); from the signification of the “reeds,” as being truths from good and the consequent powers (as above, n. 9555, 9558); and from the signification of “the lampstand,” out of which they were to be, as being the Divine spiritual which is in heaven and in the church from the Lord (n. 9548). From this it is evident that by “the pomegranates and the reeds that were to be out of the lampstand,” is signified that the memory-knowledges of good and the powers shall be from the Divine spiritual which is from the Lord. How the case is with these things may be seen in what now follows.

AC (Potts) n. 9568 sRef Ex@25 @36 S0′ 9568. One solid of pure gold. That this signifies entire and perfect because from the same good, is evident from the signification of “one solid thing,” as being wholly, thus all from the good which is signified by “gold” (see n. 9550), thus what is entire and perfect; for that which is wholly from good is entire and perfect. By that which is wholly from good, thus by that which is entire and perfect, is meant when good is the all in all, not only in the truths which are signified by “the reeds,” but also in the memory-knowledges which are signified by “the pomegranates and the flowers.” But how the case herein is shall now be stated. Good is the source of truths, and truths from good are the source of memory-knowledges. So is the one derived and produced from the other. Nevertheless good is everything in its products and derivatives, because these are from good. The case herein is like that with end, cause, and effect.
[2] The end is everything of the cause, and the cause is everything of the effect; whence it follows that the end is everything of the effect, insomuch that if the end or final cause is withdrawn, there is no efficient cause and no effect of it. In like manner do the celestial, the spiritual, and the natural succeed each other; from the celestial is all the spiritual, and from the spiritual is all the natural, that is, from the celestial through the spiritual. With man all is called “celestial” that is of the good of love, all “spiritual” that is of the truth of faith thence derived, and all “natural” that is of memory-knowledge. That memory-knowledge is natural, is because this knowledge is truth appearing in the light of the world; whereas the truth of faith, insofar as it is of faith with man, is in the light of heaven.
[3] From all this it can now be seen how one thing is produced and derived from another, and that the first is everything in the products and derivatives, insomuch that if the first is withdrawn, the things which follow from it perish. Everyone capable of perception can know that the Divine is the first of all things, and therefore is the all in all of the order of things, thus in all things of good and truth which make heaven, and which make the life of heaven, with man. Consequently good from the Divine is in all the truths of faith, and if good is not everything in them, and if the Divine of the Lord is not everything in good, the man has in him nothing of heaven, thus nothing of the church.
[4] But the Divine of the Lord is in all things of good with a man, and from this in all things of truth with him, when he wills from love, and believes from the consequent faith, that all good and all truth, thus everything of love and everything of faith, are from the Lord, and absolutely nothing from himself; and also that he possesses the truth of faith in the exact proportion of his reception of good from the Lord; for, as before said, good is the all in all things of truth, and truth without good is truth without life. From all this it can be seen what is meant by that which is entire and perfect because from the same good, which is signified by “one solid of pure gold.”

AC (Potts) n. 9569 sRef Ex@25 @37 S0′ 9569. And thou shalt make the lamps thereof, seven. That this signifies holy spiritual things from it, is evident from the signification of a “lamp,” as being the faith and intelligence of truth, which are from the Lord alone (see n. 9548), thus what is spiritual, for the Divine truth which is from the Lord, and through which are faith, intelligence, and wisdom, is the spiritual; and from the signification of “seven,” as being what is holy (n. 395, 433, 716, 881, 5265, 5268). The lamps were seven in number because the Divine truth, from which are faith, intelligence, and wisdom, is what is called “holy,” for the reason that it proceeds from the Divine good of the Lord’s Divine love; and the Divine good of the Divine love is that which makes holy. It was from this that sanctifications were effected with oil, as the sanctification of the tent, and of all things therein, of the altar, of Aaron and his sons, and of their garments, and afterward of the kings, from which they were called “the anointed;” for “oil” signifies the good of love (n. 886, 3728, 4582, 4638).

AC (Potts) n. 9570 sRef Ex@25 @37 S0′ 9570. And it shall make its lamps go up. That this signifies the light of the spiritual heaven, is evident from the signification of “making its lamps go up,” as being to kindle a light in them, that they may give light; and as the spiritual heaven was represented by the lampstand (see n. 9548), therefore by “making the lamps go up” is signified the light of the spiritual heaven. The light of the spiritual heaven is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, and the consequent faith, intelligence of truth, and wisdom of good (see what was cited in n. 9548). How the case is with the light of the spiritual heaven shall be briefly stated. In the Lord’s celestial kingdom, which is the inmost or third heaven, there is a light which immeasurably surpasses the light in the spiritual kingdom, which is the middle or second heaven. The light of the celestial kingdom, that is, of the inmost heaven, does not appear as light, but as flame; the reason being that the good of love reigns in this heaven, and in heaven the good of love is presented to view as flame. But in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, which is the middle or second heaven, there is a light which immeasurably surpasses the light of the world, and yet it appears bright white, for the reason that in this heaven there reigns the truth of faith from the good of charity; and in heaven the truth of faith from this good is presented to view as a bright white light. From this in the Word also “light” signifies the truth which is from good, and in the supreme sense the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good. From all this it can now be seen what is meant by “the light of the spiritual heaven,” and what by “the flame of the lamp,” from which is this light.

AC (Potts) n. 9571 sRef John@5 @37 S0′ sRef Ex@25 @37 S0′ sRef John@1 @18 S0′ 9571. And it shall give light over against the faces of it. That this signifies from the Divine good of the Lord’s Divine Human, is evident from the signification of “giving light,” as being the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good; for it is this which gives light to heaven and the angels themselves who are there, and also to the church and the men therein who are in faith from good. The illumination from this is the illumination of the mind, from which come intelligence and wisdom in the truths and goods of faith. The mind is illuminated by means of the Word, because the Word is Divine truth from the Lord. And from the signification of “the faces,” when said of the Lord, as being all that which is from the Divine good of His Divine love (n. 9545, 9546). The reason why it is from the Divine good of the Lord’s Divine Human, is that the Lord’s Divine Human is the source of light in heaven, for it is the Sun of heaven, from which is light, and the light from this is Divine truth (see n. 1053, 1521-1533, 1619-1632, 2776, 3094, 3138, 3167, 3190, 3195, 3222, 3223, 3337, 3339, 3341, 3636, 3643, 3862, 3993, 4060, 4180, 4302, 4408, 4414, 4415, 4419, 4527, 4598, 5400, 6032, 6313, 6315, 6608, 6907, 7174, 8644, 8707, 8861, 9399, 9407); and that the Lord is the Sun of heaven may also be seen above (n. 1053, 1521, 1529, 1530, 1531, 2441, 3636, 3643, 4321, 5097, 7078, 7083, 7171, 7173, 8644, 8812). The Divine Human of the Lord is the source of light in heaven, because the Divine cannot be seen except under a human form, as also the Lord taught in these passages:
No man hath seen God at any time; the Only-begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, He hath set Him forth (John 1:18).
Ye have not heard the voice of the Father at any time, nor seen His shape (John 5:37).

AC (Potts) n. 9572 sRef John@13 @10 S0′ sRef Ex@25 @38 S0′ 9572. And the tongs thereof, and the basins thereof. That this signifies the purifiers and evacuators in the natural, is evident from the signification of “tongs and basins,” as being things for cleansing, thus for purifying and emptying. That these are in the natural, is because the natural is the emunctory,* thus the place of purifying and evacuating; for all things that belong to the internal or spiritual man descend into the natural, and are purified; for there things filthy and superfluous are discharged, and things suitable for uses are disposed into order. That this is done in the natural, can be seen from the fact that while the internal or spiritual man is in the body, it thinks in the natural, and sets forth or utters its thoughts in the corporeal; and that it also wills in the natural, and does what it wills in the corporeal; and therefore the evacuators and cleansers are there. This is signified by “the washing of the feet,” of which the Lord thus speaks in John:
He that is washed needeth not save to be washed as to his feet, and is clean every whit (John 13:10);
“washing” signified the purification of the internal man (n. 3147, 5954, 9088); and “the feet,” the natural (n. 2162, 3147, 3761, 3986, 4280, 4938-4952).
* place of waste removal

AC (Potts) n. 9573 sRef Ex@25 @38 S0′ 9573. Shall be of pure gold. That this signifies also from good, is evident from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love (of which above, n. 9549). The reason why the purifiers and evacuators must also be from good, is evident from what was shown above (n. 9568).

AC (Potts) n. 9574 sRef Ex@35 @39 S0′ 9574. A talent of pure gold shall it be made, with all these vessels. That this signifies celestial good, from which is spiritual good together with its memory-knowledges, is evident from the signification of “a talent of pure gold,” as being the one good from which are all things, for “a talent” denotes one, and “gold” denotes good (see n. 9549); and “the vessels,” which were also to be of the same good, denote memory-knowledges (n. 9557, 9559, 9560, 9563, 9564; that “vessels” in general denote truths and memory-knowledges, see n. 3068, 3079, 9394, 9544). As good must be everything in all the products and derivatives, thus celestial good in spiritual goods, and from this in memory-knowledges (n. 9568), therefore it is said that the lampstand must be made of pure solid gold (n. 9549, 9550); and that the shaft, the reed, the cups, the pomegranates, and the flowers, must be from the same (n. 9551-9554); and here that it, together with all these vessels, must be made from a talent of pure gold.

AC (Potts) n. 9575 sRef Ex@25 @40 S0′ 9575. Verse 40. And see and make them in their form which thou wast made to see in the mountain. “And see and make them in their form,” signifies a representative of all things; “which thou wast made to see in the mountain,” signifies which were seen in heaven with the eyes of the spirit.

AC (Potts) n. 9576 sRef Ex@25 @40 S0′ 9576. And see and make them in their form. That this signifies a representative of all things, is evident from the signification of a “form,” as being a representative (see above n. 9481, 9482); here a representative of heaven where the Lord is, and of all things of heaven, or of all things of the Lord in heaven; for there is meant the form of the ark, of the Habitation, of the table for the breads of faces, of the lampstand, and of the vessels, by which are represented heaven where the Lord is, and also the things of heaven.

AC (Potts) n. 9577 sRef Ex@25 @40 S0′ 9577. Which thou wast made to see in the mountain. That this signifies which were seen in heaven with the eyes of the spirit, is evident from the signification of “seeing,” when said of the representatives in heaven, as being to see with the eyes of the spirit (of which in what follows); and from the signification of “Mount Sinai,” as being heaven (see n. 8805, 9420). With regard to the fact that “to see,” when said of the representatives that appear in heaven, denotes to see with the eyes of the spirit, be it known that the angelic spirits, who are in the ultimate or first heaven, constantly see forms of things like those which are in the world, such as paradises, trees therein with their fruits; flowers and plants; also houses, palaces, and likewise animals of many kinds; besides countless other things which are not seen in the world. All these things are representatives of the heavenly things in the higher heavens, and which in the first heaven are so presented in a form before the eyes of the spirits below, that an angelic spirit can know and perceive from them everything that is coming-forth in the higher heavens; for all things, down to the smallest particulars, are representative and significative. From this it can be seen what is meant by the representative of heaven and of the heavenly things which are signified by the ark, the cherubs, the Habitation, the table therein, and the lampstand.
[2] Such things cannot be seen by the eyes of a man, so long as he is in the world, for these eyes have been formed to receive earthly and bodily, thus material things. They are therefore so gross that they cannot even compass with their vision the interior things of nature, as can be well enough seen from the lenses they need to be furnished with in order to see merely those things of interior nature that are nearest to them. In a word, these eyes are most dull, and being such, the representatives which appear to spirits in the other life cannot possibly be seen by them; and if they are to appear, the light of the world must be taken away from the eyes, and then the things which are in the light of heaven may be seen. For there is a light of heaven, and there is a light of the world. The light of heaven is for the spirit of man, and the light of the world is for his body. The case herein is as follows. The things that are in the light of heaven are in thick darkness so long as a man sees from the light of the world; and, conversely, the things that are in the light of the world are in thick darkness when a man sees from the light of heaven. From this it is that when the light of the world is taken away from the sight of the bodily eye, the eyes of the man’s spirit are opened, and those things are seen which are in the light of heaven; thus, as before said, the representative forms.
[3] From all this it can be known why it is that at the present day men are in thick darkness concerning heavenly things, and why some are in darkness so great that they do not even believe that there is a life after death, nor that they will live forever. For at the present day man is so immersed in the body, thus in bodily, earthly, and worldly things, and is consequently in so gross a light of the world, that heavenly things are absolute thick darkness to him and therefore the sight of his spirit cannot be enlightened. From all this it is now evident what it is to see with those eyes of the spirit with which Moses saw the form of the Tent on Mount Sinai.

AC (Potts) n. 9578 9578. ON THE EARTHS IN THE STARRY HEAVEN; HERE, ON THE FIRST EARTH SEEN THERE.
By means of angels from the Lord I was conducted to a certain earth in the universe, where it was granted me to look at the earth itself; but not to speak with the inhabitants of it, but with the spirits who came from it. For after their life in the world is completed, all the inhabitants, or men, of every earth, become spirits, and remain about their earth. Nevertheless these give information about their earth, and the state of its inhabitants; for men who depart out of the body carry with them all their former life, and all their memory.

AC (Potts) n. 9579 9579. To be conducted to the earths in the universe is not to be conducted and transported there as to the body, but as to the spirit; and the spirit is not conducted through spaces, but through variations of the state of the interior life, which appear to him like progressions through spaces (n. 5605, 7381, 9440). Moreover, approaches take place in accordance with the agreements or likenesses of the states, for the agreement or likeness of the state conjoins, and disagreement or unlikeness disjoins. From this it can be seen in what manner removal as to the spirit from one place to another is effected, and also the approach of the spirit to distant regions, while the man still remains in his own place.

AC (Potts) n. 9580 9580. But to conduct a spirit outside his own world by means of variations of the state of his interiors, and to cause these variations to successively advance up to a suitable or like state with that of those to whom he is being led, is in the power of the Lord alone; for there must be a constant direction and foresight from first to last, both ways, especially when this is to be effected with a man who as to the body is still in the world of nature, and who is thereby in space.

AC (Potts) n. 9581 9581. That this has been done, no one who is in the sensuous things of the body, and who thinks from them, can be brought to believe. The reason is that these sensuous things cannot grasp progressions apart from spaces. Nevertheless they who think from the sensuous of their spirit somewhat removed or withdrawn from that of the body, thus they who think interiorly within themselves, can be brought to believe and to apprehend it, because in the idea of their thought there is neither space nor time, but instead of these such things as are the sources of spaces and times. Therefore the things which follow concerning the earths in the starry heaven are for these men, and not for those first mentioned, unless they are of such a character as to suffer themselves to be instructed.

AC (Potts) n. 9582 9582. In company with some spirits from this earth, and while in a state of wakefulness, I was conducted as to my spirit to a certain earth in the universe, by means of angels from the Lord. The progression took place toward the right, and continued for two hours. Near the end of our solar system, there first appeared a shining but dense cloud, and after it a fiery smoke rising up from a great chasm. A vast abyss separated our solar world on that side from certain worlds of the starry heaven. The fiery smoke appeared for a considerable distance. I was being carried across this middle region, when underneath in that chasm or abyss there appeared very many men, who were spirits (for all spirits appear in the human form, and are actually men, n. 322, 1881). I also heard them speaking to each other there, but was not given to know whence they came and what was their nature; however, one of them told me that they were guards to prevent spirits from this world from passing into any other world in the universe without the needful facilities.

AC (Potts) n. 9583 9583. That this was so was also confirmed, for when certain spirits who were in the company came to that great interspace, and who had not received permission to pass over it, they began to cry out vehemently that they were perishing, for they were like persons struggling in the agony of death; and therefore they stayed on that side of the abyss, and could not be conveyed any further; for the fiery smoke which exhaled from the abyss filled them, and thus tormented them. The fiery smoke is falsity from the evils of concupiscences. So does this falsity appear.

AC (Potts) n. 9584 9584. A continuation about the first earth seen in the starry heaven will be found at the end of the following chapter.

AC (Potts) n. 9585 9585. CHAPTER THE TWENTY-SIXTH.

THE DOCTRINE OF CHARITY AND OF FAITH

All that is called Freedom which is of the will, thus which is of the love; whence it is that Freedom manifests itself by means of the delight of willing and thinking, and of the consequent doing and speaking. For all delight is of love, and all love is of the will, and the will is the being of man’s life.

AC (Potts) n. 9586 sRef John@8 @34 S0′ sRef John@8 @35 S0′ sRef John@8 @36 S0′ 9586. To do evil from the delight of love appears like Freedom; but is slavery, because from hell. To do good from the delight of love appears to be Freedom, and also is Freedom, because it is from the Lord. It is therefore slavery to be led by hell, and it is Freedom to be led by the Lord. This the Lord teaches in John:
Everyone that doeth sin is the servant of sin. The servant abideth not in the house forever; the Son abideth forever. If the Son shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed (John 8:34-36).

AC (Potts) n. 9587 sRef Mark@4 @26 S0′ sRef Mark@4 @27 S0′ sRef Mark@4 @28 S0′ 9587. The Lord keeps man in the Freedom of thinking; and insofar as outward bonds, which are the fear of the law and for life, and the fear of the loss of reputation, of honor, and of gain, do not hinder, He keeps him in the Freedom of doing; but, through Freedom, He bends him away from evil; and, through Freedom, He bends him to good; leading him so gently and silently that the man knows no otherwise than that everything proceeds from himself. Thus the Lord, in Freedom, inseminates and inroots good in the very life of the man, which good remains to eternity. This the Lord teaches in Mark:
So is the Kingdom of God, as a man who casteth seed into the earth; the seed germinateth and groweth, while he knoweth not. The earth beareth fruit of its own accord (Mark 4:26-28).
“The kingdom of God” denotes heaven with man, thus the good of love and the truth of faith.

AC (Potts) n. 9588 9588. That which is inseminated in Freedom remains, because it is inrooted in the very will of man, which is the being of his life. But that which is inseminated under compulsion does not remain, because what is of compulsion is not from the will of the man, but is from the will of him who compels. For this reason worship from Freedom is pleasing to the Lord, but not worship from compulsion; for worship from Freedom is worship from love, because all Freedom is of love.

AC (Potts) n. 9589 9589. There is heavenly Freedom, and there is infernal Freedom. Heavenly Freedom is to be led by the Lord, and this Freedom is the love of what is good and true. But infernal Freedom is to be led by the devil, and this Freedom is the love of what is evil and false; properly speaking, it is concupiscence.

AC (Potts) n. 9590 9590. They who are in infernal Freedom believe it to be slavery and compulsion not to be allowed to do what is evil and to think what is false at pleasure. But they who are in heavenly Freedom feel horror in doing what is evil and in thinking what is false, and if they are compelled thereto, they are in torment.

AC (Potts) n. 9591 9591. From all this it can be seen what Free Will is, namely, that is to do what is good from choice, or from the will; and that they are in this Freedom who are led by the Lord.

EXODUS 26

1. And thou shalt make the Habitation, ten curtains; of fine twined linen, and blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, with cherubs, the work of a thinker,* shalt thou make them.
2. The length of one curtain shall be eight and twenty cubits; and the breadth four cubits, for one curtain; one measure for all the curtains.
3. Five curtains shall be joined together one to the other; and five curtains shall be joined together one to the other.
4. And thou shalt make loops of blue upon the edge of the one curtain at the extremity in the joining, and so shalt thou do in the edge of the uttermost curtain in the second joining.
5. Fifty loops shalt thou make in the one curtain, and fifty loops shalt thou make in the extremity of the curtain that is in the second joining; the loops shall be taken up one to the other.
6. And thou shalt make fifty hooks of gold, and shalt join together the curtains one to the other in the hooks, and it shall be one Habitation.
7. And thou shalt make curtains of goats’ [hair] for a Tent over the Habitation; eleven curtains shalt thou make them.
8. The length of one curtain shall be thirty cubits, and the breadth four cubits, for one curtain; one measure for the eleven curtains.
9. And thou shalt join together five curtains by themselves, and six curtains by themselves, and shalt double the sixth curtain over against the faces of the Tent.
10. And thou shalt make fifty loops upon the edge of the one uttermost curtain in the joining, and fifty loops upon the edge of the curtain of the second joining.
11. And thou shalt make fifty hooks of brass, and shalt bring the hooks into the loops, and shalt join together the Tent, that it may be one.
12. And that which superaboundeth over and above in the curtains of the Tent, the half of the curtain that is over and above, thou shalt make to superabound over the hinder parts of the Habitation.
13. And the cubit on the one side, and the cubit on the other side, in that which is over and above in the length of the curtains of the Tent, shall superabound over the sides of the Habitation, on this side and on that, to cover it.
14. And thou shalt make for the Tent a covering of skins of red rams, and a covering of badgers’ skins above.
15. And thou shalt make the planks for the Habitation of shittim wood, standing up.
16. Ten cubits shall be the length of a plank, and a cubit and half a cubit the breadth of one plank.
17. Two hands shall there be in one plank, combined one to the other: thus shalt thou make for all the planks of the Habitation.
18. And thou shalt make the planks for the Habitation, twenty planks for the corner of the south toward the south.
19. And thou shalt make forty bases of silver under the twenty planks; two bases under one plank for its two hands, and two bases under one plank for its two hands.
20. And for the other side of the Habitation, at the corner of the north, twenty planks:
21. And their forty bases of silver; two bases under one plank, and two bases under one plank.
22. And for the two legs of the Habitation toward the sea thou shalt make six planks.
23. And two planks shalt thou make for the corners of the Habitation in the two legs.
24. And they shall be twinned from beneath, and they shall be twinned together at the head of it unto one ring; thus shall it be for them both; they shall be at the two corners.
25. And there shall be eight planks, and their bases of silver, sixteen bases; two bases under one plank, and two bases under one plank.
26. And thou shalt make bars of shittim wood; five for the planks of the one side of the Habitation:
27. And five bars for the planks of the other side of the Habitation, and five bars for the planks of the side of the Habitation at the two legs toward the sea.
28. And the middle bar in the middle of the planks shall pass through from extremity to extremity.
29. And thou shalt overlay the planks with gold, and make their rings of gold, houses for the bars; and thou shalt overlay the bars with gold.
30. And thou shalt set up the Habitation according to the method which thou wast made to see in the mountain.
31. And thou shalt make a veil of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen; with the work of a thinker* shall he make it, with cherubs:
32. And thou shalt bestow it upon four pillars of shittim overlaid with gold, and their hooks of gold, upon four bases of silver.
33. And thou shalt bestow the veil under the hooks, and shalt bring in thither from within the veil the ark of the Testimony; and the veil shall divide for you between the holy and the holy of holies.
34. And thou shalt bestow the propitiatory [mercy seat] upon the ark of the Testimony in the holy of holies.
35. And thou shalt put the table outside the veil, and the lampstand over against the table upon the side of the Habitation toward the south; and thou shalt bestow the table at the side of the north.
36. And thou shalt make a covering for the door of the Tent, of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen, the work of the embroiderer.
37. And thou shalt make for the covering five pillars of shittim, and overlay them with gold; and their hooks shall be of gold; and thou shalt cast for them five bases of brass.
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9592 sRef Ex@26 @0 S0′ 9592. THE CONTENTS.
In this chapter the second or middle heaven is represented by the Habitation and the Tent; and the celestial and spiritual things therein are represented by the things of which these were constructed. And afterward the Intermediate that unites this heaven and the inmost heaven is represented by the veil between the Habitation and the ark of the Testimony.

AC (Potts) n. 9593 sRef Ex@26 @1 S0′ 9593. THE INTERNAL SENSE.
Verse l. And thou shalt make the Habitation ten curtains of fine twined linen, and blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, with cherubs; the work of a thinker* shalt thou make them. “And thou shalt make the Habitation,” signifies the second or middle heaven; “ten curtains,” signifies all the truths from which it is; “of fine twined linen, and blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed,” signifies the spiritual and celestial things from which are these truths; “with cherubs,” signifies the guard of the Lord lest it be approached and injured by the hells; “the work of a thinker* shalt thou make them,” signifies the understanding.
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9594 sRef Ex@26 @1 S0′ 9594. And thou shalt make the Habitation. That this signifies the second or middle heaven, is evident from the signification of “the Habitation,” when said of the Divine, as being heaven, in particular the middle or second heaven. It is known that there are three heavens: the inmost, the middle, and the ultimate; or the third, the second, and the first. All these heavens were represented by the tabernacle: by the ark, where the Testimony was, the inmost or third heaven; by the Habitation, where were the table for the breads of faces and the lampstand, the middle or second heaven; and by the court, the ultimate or first heaven. That there are three heavens is because there are three degrees of life in man (for the man who becomes an angel after death constitutes heaven; from no other source are the angels, from no other is heaven). The inmost degree of the man’s life is for the inmost heaven; the middle degree of his life is for the middle heaven; and the ultimate degree is for the ultimate heaven. Man being such, or so formed, and heaven being from the human race, there are therefore three heavens.
[2] These three degrees of life in man are opened successively; the first degree by a life in accordance with what is equitable and just; the second degree by a life in accordance with the truths of faith from the Word, and in accordance with the consequent goods of charity toward the neighbor; and the third degree by a life in accordance with the good of mutual love and the good of love to the Lord. These are the means whereby are successively opened these three degrees of life in man, thus the three heavens in him. But be it known that in proportion as a man recedes from the good of life, and accedes to the evil of life, these degrees are closed, that is, the heavens are closed in him; for just as the good of life opens them, so the evil of life closes them. It is from this that all who are in evil are outside of heaven, thus are in hell. And because, as before said, the heavens are successively opened in a man according to the good of his life, be it known that for this reason in some the first heaven is opened and not the second; and in some the second heaven is opened and not the third; and that the third heaven is opened in those only who are in the good of life from love to the Lord. (That a man is heaven in the least form, and that he was created after the image both of heaven and of the world, may be seen in the passages cited in n. 9279).
sRef Ps@43 @4 S3′ sRef Ps@46 @4 S3′ sRef Ps@43 @3 S3′ sRef Ps@74 @7 S3′ sRef Ps@84 @1 S3′ [3] Therefore it is the inmost heaven which is represented by the ark of the Testimony, treated of in the preceding chapter; it is the middle heaven which is represented by the Habitation, treated of in this chapter; and it is the ultimate heaven which is represented by the court, treated of in the following chapter. Heaven is called “the Habitation of God” from the fact that the Divine of the Lord dwells there; for it is the Divine truth proceeding from the Lord’s Divine good that makes heaven, for this gives the life of an angel who is there. And because the Lord dwells with the angels in that which is from Himself (n. 9338e), therefore heaven is called “the Habitation of God,” and the Divine truths themselves from the Divine good, of which the angels or the angelic societies are the receptions, are called His “Habitations; as in the following passages:
O send out Thy light and Thy truth; let these lead me; let them lead me unto the mountain of holiness, and to Thy habitations; that I may go in unto the altar of God, unto God (Ps. 43:3-4).
There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of God, the holiness of the habitations of the Most High (Ps. 46:4).
They have profaned the habitation of Thy name to the earth (Ps. 74:7).
How lovely are Thy habitations, O Jehovah (Ps. 84:1).
sRef Ps@132 @5 S4′ sRef Ps@132 @6 S4′ sRef Ps@132 @2 S4′ sRef Ps@132 @4 S4′ sRef Ps@132 @7 S4′ [4] That the Divine things which proceed from the Lord’s Divine Human are what are in particular called His “Habitations,” and that from this, heaven itself is called His “Habitation” is also evident in David:
He swore to Jehovah, he vowed to the Mighty One of Jacob, I will not give sleep to mine eyes until I have found out a place for Jehovah, habitations for the Mighty One of Jacob. Lo, we heard of Him in Ephrathah, we found Him in the fields of the forest; we will go into His Habitations (Ps. 132:2, 4-7).
“The Mighty One of Jacob” denotes the Lord as to the Divine Human (n. 6425); “Ephrathah,” where He was to be found, is Bethlehem, where He was born (Gen. 35:19; 48:7; Micah 5:2; Matt. 2:4-6); “the fields of the forest” denote the goods of the church among the Gentiles.
sRef Ezek@37 @26 S5′ sRef Ezek@37 @25 S5′ sRef Ezek@37 @27 S5′ [5] In Ezekiel:
They shall dwell upon the land that I have given to Jacob My servant; they shall dwell upon it, they and their sons’ sons forever; and David My servant shall be prince to them forever. I will make a covenant of peace with them; it shall be an everlasting covenant with them, and I will set My sanctuary in the midst of them forever. So shall My habitation be with them (Ezek. 37:25-27).
“David,” who was to be “prince to them” denotes the Lord (n. 1888); “the sanctuary” denotes the Lord’s Divine Human, because from Him is all that is holy (n. 3210, 9229); thus His “Habitation” denotes heaven and the church where the Lord is.
sRef Jer@30 @18 S6′ [6] In Jeremiah:
Thus said Jehovah, Behold I bring back the captivity of Jacob’s tents, and have compassion on his habitations, that the city shall be built upon its heap (Jer. 30:18).
“To bring back the captivity of Jacob’s tents” denotes to restore the goods and truths of the external church which had been destroyed; “having compassion on his habitations” denotes to restore the truths of the internal church; “the city which shall be built upon its heap” denotes the doctrine of truth (n. 2449, 2943, 3216, 4492, 4493).
[7] In what way the Lord dwells in the heavens, can be seen from what has been shown already concerning the Lord; namely, that the Lord as to the Divine Human is the Sun from which are the heat and light in the heavens. The heat from the Lord as the Sun is love, and the light is faith. From this the Lord dwells with those who receive from Him the good of love and the truth of faith, thus the heat and light of life. His presence is according to the degrees of the reception.

AC (Potts) n. 9595 sRef Ex@26 @1 S0′ 9595. Ten curtains. That this signifies all the truths from which it is, is evident from the signification of “ten,” as being all (see n. 4638), consequently a “tenth part,” which is one curtain, denotes as much as is sufficient (n. 8468, 8540); and from the signification of the “curtains,” as being the interior truths of faith which are of the new understanding. For by “the Habitation” is signified the middle or second heaven, which is heaven from the reception of the Divine truth that is from the Lord’s Divine good (as above, n. 9594); consequently the “curtains” of which it was constructed and with which it was covered, denote the truths of faith which are of the new understanding. That these denote interior truths is because exterior truths are signified by the “curtains from goats” for the Tent that was round about, which also are treated of in this chapter.
sRef Isa@54 @1 S2′ sRef Isa@54 @2 S2′ sRef Isa@54 @3 S2′ [2] That “the curtains” denote the truths of faith belonging to those who are in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, is evident from the passages in the Word where they are mentioned; as in Isaiah:
Sing, O barren one that didst not bear, for more are the sons of the desolate one than the sons of the married one; enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch out the curtains of thine habitations; lengthen the cords. For thou shalt break forth on the right hand and on the left; and thy seed shall inherit the nations (Isa. 54:1-3);
treating of the church about to be set up among the Gentiles, which is called “the barren one that did not bear,” for the reason that they had been without truths from the Word (n. 9325); and now it is said to have “more sons than the sons of the married one,” because its truths are more numerous than the truths of the former devastated church, for “sons” denote truths (n. 489, 491, 533, 1147, 3373, 3704); “to enlarge the place of the tent” denotes the holiness of worship from the good of love (n. 3312, 4391, 4599); “to stretch out the curtains of the habitations” denotes the holiness of worship from the truths of faith.
sRef Jer@4 @20 S3′ [3] In Jeremiah:
The whole land hath been laid waste, suddenly have My tents been laid waste, My curtains in a moment (Jer. 4:20).
“The land that hath been laid waste” denotes the church (n. 9325); “tents laid waste” denotes the holiness of worship from the good of love; “curtains laid waste” denotes holy worship from the truths of faith.
sRef Jer@49 @29 S4′ sRef Hab@3 @7 S4′ sRef Jer@49 @28 S4′ [4] Again:
My tent hath been laid waste, and all My cords pulled out; My sons are gone forth from Me, and they are not; there is none to stretch out My tent any more, and to set up My curtains. For the shepherds are become foolish (Jer. 10:20, 21);
where the meaning is similar. Again:
Arise ye, and go up against Arabia, and lay waste the sons of the east; let them take their tents and their flocks, let them carry away for themselves their curtains, and all their vessels, and their camels (Jer. 49:28, 29).
“Arabia and the sons of the east” denote those who are in the knowledges of good and truth (n. 3249); “taking the tents and flocks” denotes the interior goods of the church (n. 8937); “taking the curtains” denotes the interior truths of the church; “their vessels” denote the exterior truths of the church (n. 3068, 3079); “camels” denote general memory-knowledges (n. 3048, 3071, 3143, 3145). In Habakkuk:
Under Aven I saw the tents of Cushan; the curtains of Midian did shake (Hab. 3:7).
“The curtains of Midian” denote truths with those who are in simple good (n. 3242, 4756, 4788, 6773, 6775).
sRef Ps@104 @1 S5′ sRef Ps@104 @2 S5′ [5] From all this it is evident what is meant in David:
O Jehovah Thou hast put on glory and honor; who covereth Himself with light as with a garment; He stretcheth out the heavens like a curtain (Ps. 104:1, 2).
“To cover Himself with light as with a garment” denotes Divine truths. (That “light” denotes truth, see n. 9548; as also “a garment,” n. 4545, 4763, 5319, 5954, 9093, 9212, 9216); consequently “to stretch out the heavens like a curtain” denotes to enlarge the heavens by means of an influx of truth Divine, from which come intelligence and wisdom. That “to stretch out and expand the heavens” is predicated of the new, that is, the regenerate, understanding, may be seen at the end of the following article.

AC (Potts) n. 9596 sRef Ex@26 @1 S0′ 9596. Of fine twined linen, and blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed. That this signifies the spiritual and celestial things from which are these truths, is evident from the signification of “fine twined linen,” as being truths from a celestial origin (see n. 9469); from the signification of “blue” [hyacinthinum] as being the celestial love of truth (n. 9466); from the signification of “crimson,” as being the celestial love of good (n. 9467); and from the signification of “scarlet double-dyed,” as being spiritual good, or the good of truth (n. 9468). Such is the order in which spiritual and celestial things, or truths and goods, follow with the man, and with the angel, who is in the middle or second heaven. For first is truth from a celestial origin, which is signified by “fine linen;” next is the love or affection of truth, which is signified by “blue;” afterward is the consequent love or affection of good, which is signified by “crimson;” and lastly is spiritual good, which is signified by “scarlet double-dyed.”
[2] As spiritual and celestial things follow in this order, therefore fine twined linen is here mentioned first; but in the case of the veil, which was between the Habitation and the ark, or between the holy and the holy of holies-see verse 31 of this chapter-it is mentioned in the last place. The reason why in the veil the fine twined linen is mentioned last, is that the veil signifies the intermediate that unites the inmost heaven with the middle heaven, and therefore in this intermediate it must be the last, so that, for the sake of conjunction, it may be the first in what follows.
[3] But by “fine twined linen” is properly signified the understanding such as belongs to a spiritual man, or to an angel who is in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom. The reason why the understanding is signified by “fine twined linen,” is that with the spiritual man a new will from the Lord has been implanted in his understanding (n. 863, 875, 895, 927, 1023, 1043, 1044, 1555, 2256, 4328, 4493, 5113); and as the understanding of the spiritual man is signified by “fine twined linen,” therefore also spiritual truth is signified thereby, because all truth belongs to the part of the understanding, and all good to the part of the will (n. 3623, 9300); for the understanding is the subject or containant, and truth belongs to it, and these two make a one. From all this it can also be seen that with those who are of the Lord’s spiritual kingdom the understanding is “the Habitation” in the close sense (n. 9296, 9297), and that it is described by the expanse of the curtains.
sRef Isa@42 @5 S4′ sRef Jer@51 @15 S4′ sRef Jer@10 @21 S4′ sRef Jer@10 @20 S4′ sRef Isa@45 @12 S4′ sRef Isa@44 @24 S4′ sRef Zech@12 @1 S4′ [4] From all this it can be known what is signified by “spreading out and stretching out the heavens” in the following passages:
Jehovah that stretcheth out the heavens, that spreadeth out the earth, that giveth breath to the people upon it, and spirit to them that walk therein (Isa. 42:5).
I, Jehovah, that maketh all things; that stretcheth out the heavens alone; that spreadeth out the earth by Myself (Isa. 44:24).
I have made the earth, and created man upon it; I, My hands, have stretched out the heavens (Isa. 45:12).
He who maketh the earth by His power, prepareth the world by His wisdom, and by His intelligence stretcheth out the heavens (Jer. 51:15).
Jehovah, that stretcheth out the heavens, and layeth the foundation of the earth, and formeth the spirit of man in the midst of him (Zech. 12:1).
[5] That by “stretching out the heavens and spreading out the earth” the same is here signified as by “stretching out and spreading out the habitation” by means of the curtains is manifest; and that this denotes to regenerate man, and thus to create or form a new understanding in which is a new will, which is the very heaven of the spiritual man, wherein the Lord dwells with this man. That it is regeneration, or the formation of a new understanding and therein of a new will, thus of a new man, which is signified by “stretching out the heavens and spreading out the earth” is clear from the very explanation given in the above passages, for it is said, “that giveth breath to the people upon it, and spirit to them that walk therein; also, “that formeth the spirit of man within him.” That “heaven and earth” denote the internal and external church, see n. 1733, 1850, 2117, 2118, 3355, 4535; also that “the earth” in general denotes the Lord’s kingdom and church (n. 9334); and this is also plainly to be seen, for unless “the earth” had this signification, what could be meant by “spreading out the earth,” and by “laying the foundation of the earth,” and by “forming the spirit of man therein”?
sRef Gen@1 @8 S6′ sRef Isa@54 @2 S6′ sRef Isa@40 @22 S6′ sRef Ps@104 @2 S6′ sRef Gen@1 @6 S6′ sRef Gen@1 @7 S6′ [6] That by “stretching out the heavens, and spreading out the earth” the like is here signified as by “stretching out and spreading out the habitation” by means of the curtains is evident from other passages where it is stated more expressly, as in the following:
Jehovah, that stretcheth out the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in (Isa. 40:22).
Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch the curtains of thy habitations (Isa. 54:2).
Jehovah covereth Himself with light as with a garment; He stretcheth out the heavens like a curtain (Ps. 104:2).
From all this it is also evident what is signified by “the expanse” in the first chapter of Genesis:
God said, Let there be an expanse in the midst of the waters, and let it be to the waters a dividing between the waters. And God made the expanse, and divided between the waters that were under the expanse and the waters that were above the expanse. And God called the expanse heaven (Gen. 1:6-8).
In this first chapter is described the regeneration of the man of the celestial church; and his new will and understanding are described by “the expanse;” “the waters under the expanse, and above the expanse” denote the truths of the external and of the internal man (that “waters” denote truths, see n. 2702, 3058, 3424, 4976, 8568, 9323).

AC (Potts) n. 9597 sRef Ex@26 @1 S0′ 9597. With cherubs. That this signifies the guard of the Lord lest heaven be approached and injured by the hells, is evident from the signification of “cherubs,” as being a guard and providence lest the Lord be approached except through good, and lest the good which is from the Lord in heaven and with man be injured (see n. 9509); consequently lest heaven be approached and injured by the hells.

AC (Potts) n. 9598 sRef Ex@31 @4 S0′ sRef Ex@31 @5 S0′ sRef Ex@31 @2 S0′ sRef Ex@31 @3 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @1 S0′ 9598. The work of a thinker* shalt thou make them. That this signifies the understanding, is evident from the signification of “a thinker,”* as being the understanding, for this thinks and acts from what is thought. That it is the understanding to which wisdom, intelligence, and knowledge belong, is evident in what follows, where it is said of Bezaleel:
I have called by name Bezaleel, and I have filled him with the spirit of God, as to wisdom, as to intelligence, and as to knowledge, and as to all work; to think thoughts, to work in gold, in silver, and in brass, and in the engraving of stone for filling, and in the carving of wood, to work in every work of thought (Exod. 31:2-5; 35:30-33).
(That the understanding is signified, is also evident from what was shown just above, n. 9596.)
* Latin, excogitator; Hebrew, hashab, to think out – a skilled craftsman. [Reviser.]

AC (Potts) n. 9599 sRef Ex@26 @2 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @3 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @6 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @4 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @5 S0′ 9599. Verses 2-6. The length of one curtain shall be eight and twenty cubits, and the breadth four cubits, for one curtain; one measure for all the curtains. Five curtains shall be joined together one to the other; and five curtains shall be joined together one to the other. And thou shalt make loops of blue upon the edge of the one curtain at the extremity in the joining, and so shalt thou do in the edge of the uttermost curtain in the second joining together. Fifty loops shalt thou make in the one curtain, and fifty loops shalt thou make in the extremity of the curtain that is in the second joining together; the loops shall be taken up one to the other. And thou shalt make fifty hooks of gold, and shalt join together the curtains one to another in the hooks, and it shall be one Habitation. “The length of one curtain shall be eight and twenty cubits,” signifies the holiness of truth from good; “and the breadth four cubits,” signifies the marriage of truth with good; “for one curtain,” signifies thus for each of the truths; “one measure for all the curtains,” signifies a like state of the matter; “five curtains shall be joined together one to the other, and five curtains shall be joined together one to the other,” signifies the constant communication of truth with good, and of good with truth; “and thou shalt make loops of blue,” signifies conjunction through the celestial love of truth; “upon the edge of the one curtain at the extremity in the joining,” signifies of one sphere with the other; “and so shalt thou do in the edge of the uttermost curtain in the second joining together,” signifies thus reciprocally; “fifty loops shalt thou make in the one curtain,” signifies complete conjunction in the ultimates of the spheres; “and fifty loops shalt thou make in the extremity of the curtain that is in the second joining together,” signifies in like manner reciprocally; “the loops shall be taken up one to the other,” signifies conjunction in every way on both sides; “and thou shalt make fifty hooks of gold,” signifies a full capability of conjunction from good; “and shalt join together the curtains one to the other in the hooks,” signifies the method of conjunction everywhere; “and it shall be one Habitation,” signifies the whole heaven thus altogether one.

AC (Potts) n. 9600 sRef Ex@26 @2 S0′ 9600. The length of one curtain shall be eight and twenty cubits. That this signifies the holiness of truth from good, is evident from the signification of “length,” as being good (see n. 1613, 8898, 9487); from the signification of a “curtain,” as being the interior truth of faith which belongs to the new understanding (of which above, n. 9595); and from the signification of “eight and twenty,” as being the holiness of conjunction. That this is the signification of “eight and twenty” is because this number arises from the multiplication of seven by four, and by “seven” is signified what is holy (n. 433, 716, 881, 5265, 5268), and by “four” conjunction (n. 1686, 8877). For numbers when multiplied have a similar signification to that of the simple numbers of which they are the product (n. 5291, 5335, 5708, 7973). From this it is plain that by “the length of one curtain being eight and twenty cubits” is signified the holiness of truth from good.

AC (Potts) n. 9601 sRef Ex@26 @2 S0′ 9601. And the breadth four cubits. That this signifies the marriage of truth with good, is evident from the signification of “breadth,” as being truth (see n. 1613, 3433, 3434, 4482, 9487); and from the signification of “four,” as being conjunction, thus marriage, for the conjunction of truth and good is called the heavenly marriage (n. 2173, 2618, 2728, 2729, 2803). “Four” denotes conjunction or marriage because this number arises from two multiplied by itself, and “two” denotes conjunction (n. 5194, 8423); and because multiplied numbers have a similar signification to that of the simple numbers of which they are compounded (as was said just above, n. 9600). (That all numbers in the Word signify real things, may be seen in the passages cited in n. 9488.)

AC (Potts) n. 9602 sRef Ex@26 @2 S0′ 9602. For one curtain. That this signifies thus for each of the truths, is evident from the signification of a “curtain,” as being truth (see n. 9595). Therefore by “one curtain,” or by each one, is signified each of the truths.

AC (Potts) n. 9603 sRef Ex@26 @2 S0′ 9603. One measure for all the curtains. That this signifies a like state of the matter, is evident from the signification of a “measure,” as being the state of a thing as to truth (see n. 3104); consequently “one measure for all the curtains” denotes a like state of the matter for all the truths. By a like state of the matter, when said concerning the truths of faith in the spiritual kingdom, is meant that they all look to good, and that through good they look to the Lord from whom they are; for the truths which do not look to good, and thus to the Lord, are not truths of faith, consequently are not the truths of the church or of heaven. The truths which look in another direction may indeed in their external form appear like truths, but they are not truths, because they are devoid of life; for the life of truth is good, and good is from the Lord, who alone is life. Truths which look in another direction are like the members of a body without a soul, which are not members of any body, because they are lifeless, and therefore of no use.
sRef Rev@21 @17 S2′ sRef Rev@21 @15 S2′ sRef Rev@21 @16 S2′ [2] That “measure” signifies the state of a thing as to truth, and also the state of a thing as to good, is evident from the passages in the Word that treat of the measurements of the New Jerusalem, and also of the new temple. By the “New” or “Holy Jerusalem” is signified the Lord’s New Church, in like manner by the temple; and therefore by their “measurements” are signified states as to truth and as to good; as in John:
The angel had a golden reed, to measure the holy Jerusalem, and the gates thereof, and the wall thereof; and he measured the city with the reed, twelve thousand furlongs. And he measured the wall thereof, a hundred forty and four cubits, which is the measure of a man, that is, of an angel (Rev. 21:15-17).
That the “measurements” here signify states as to good and truth is very manifest, for the “holy Jerusalem” denotes the Lord’s New Church; “the gates and the wall” denote the protecting truths of faith; “twelve thousand” denotes all truths and goods in the complex; likewise “a hundred forty and four” (n. 7973), for this number signifies the like as the number “twelve” because it arises from twelve multiplied by twelve (that “twelve” denotes all truths and goods in the complex, see n. 577, 2089, 2129, 2130, 3272, 3858, 3913); “the measure of a man, that is, of an angel” signifies that such is the state of the church and of heaven in respect to the goods of love and the truths of faith, for “a man” denotes the church, and “an angel,” heaven. Unless it were known what is signified by “the holy Jerusalem,” by its “gate” and its “wall,” by the number “twelve thousand furlongs,” and by “the measure of the wall being a hundred forty and four,” also what by “measure,” what by “a man,” and what by “an angel,” who would ever know what is meant by “the measure of the city being twelve thousand furlongs,” and “the measure of the wall a hundred forty and four cubits, the measure of a man, that is, of an angel”?
sRef Isa@40 @12 S3′ sRef Jer@31 @37 S3′ sRef Zech@2 @1 S3′ sRef Jer@31 @38 S3′ sRef Zech@2 @2 S3′ sRef Jer@31 @39 S3′ [3] The like is signified by “measurement” in Zechariah:
I lifted up mine eyes again and saw a man in whose hand was a measuring line. I said, Whither goest thou? He said, To measure Jerusalem, to see what is the breadth thereof, and what is the length thereof (Zech. 2:1-2).
Also in Ezekiel, where a man who had a measuring reed measured the houses of the new city, and also the temple, as to the outer walls, the inner walls, the gates, the foundations, the thresholds, the windows, the steps (Ezek. 40-42). Unless these measurements signified the states of the matter in respect to truth and good, such things would never have been mentioned. By “measuring” in general is signified the state of truth and good; as in these passages:
Thus said Jehovah, If the heavens above shall be measured, and the foundations of the earth searched out beneath, behold still will I disapprove the seed of Israel for all that they have done. Behold the days come in which the city shall be built to Jehovah. And the measuring line shall go out more fully over the hill Gareb, and shall turn about unto Goah (Jer. 31:37-39).
Who hath measured the waters in His fist, and meted out the heavens with the span, and weighed the mountains in scales, and the hills in a balance? (Isa. 40:12).

AC (Potts) n. 9604 sRef Ex@26 @3 S0′ 9604. Five curtains shall be joined together one to the other; and five curtains shall be joined together one to the other. That this signifies the constant communication of truth with good, and of good with truth, is evident from the signification of “five,” as being all things of one side, for by “ten” are signified all things of the whole (see n. 9595); and from the signification of the “curtains,” as being the interior truths of faith, which are of the new understanding (see also n. 9595). Hence, as five of the ten curtains were joined together, and also the other five, they therefore signified the reciprocal communication of truth and good, and of good and truth; for the communications must be reciprocal in order that there may be a conjugial conjunction of truth and good. The like things are signified by these curtains as by the things that belong to the left side and the right side in man. Those which belong to his right side relate to the good from which is truth, but those of the left side relate to the truth which is from good; and in the middle of these there is the communication of good with truth, and of truth with good, from which there results a perpetual and constant conjunction. Such are the things signified by the words, “five curtains shall be joined together one to the other, and five curtains shall be joined together one to the other.”

AC (Potts) n. 9605 sRef Ex@26 @4 S0′ 9605. And thou shalt make loops of blue. That this signifies conjunction through the celestial love of truth, is evident from the signification of “loops,” as being conjunction (that “loops” denote conjunction is because a joining together is effected by means of them), and from the signification of “blue” [hyacinthinum] as being the celestial love of truth (see n. 9466).

AC (Potts) n. 9606 sRef Ex@26 @4 S0′ 9606. Upon the edge of the one curtain at the extremity in the joining. That this signifies the conjunction of one sphere with the other, is evident from the signification of “the edge of a curtain at the extremity in the joining,” as being where one ceases and the other begins, and thus the common boundary where the two are joined together. That the sphere is what is signified is because in heaven spheres conjoin. For there are spheres which proceed from each angelic society in heaven, and from each angel in a society. These spheres, with everyone, exhale from the life of the affections of truth and of good, and are thence diffused to a distance. From this it is that the quality of spirits and of angels is known at a distance. Angels and angelic societies are conjoined, and are also disjoined, in accordance with these spheres; for similar spheres, that is, similar affections of truth and good, conjoin; and dissimilar spheres disjoin. (But see what has been already shown concerning these spheres in n. 1048, 1053, 1316, 1504-1520, 1695, 2401, 2489, 4464, 5179, 6206, 6598-6613, 7454, 8630, 8794, 8797, 9490-9492, 9498, 9534.) Whether you say angels and angelic societies, from which the spheres proceed, or truth and good, it is the same; for the spheres are from the affections of truth and good, by virtue of which angels are angels from the Lord. Be it known that insofar as these spheres derive anything from the Lord, so far they conjoin; but insofar as they derive it from the angel’s own, so far they disjoin. From this it is evident that the Lord alone conjoins.

AC (Potts) n. 9607 sRef Ex@26 @4 S0′ 9607. And so shalt thou do in the edge of the uttermost curtain in the second joining together. That this signifies thus reciprocally, that is, that the conjunction of the one sphere with the other is through the celestial love of truth, is evident without further explication.

AC (Potts) n. 9608 sRef Ex@26 @5 S0′ 9608. Fifty loops shalt thou make in the one curtain. That this signifies complete conjunction in the ultimates of the spheres, is evident from the signification of “fifty,” as being what is full (see n. 2252); from the signification of “loops,” as being conjunction (as just above, n. 9605); and from the signification of “the edge of the curtain” where the loops were, as being where the sphere of truth ceases (of which also above, n. 9606), thus in the ultimates.

AC (Potts) n. 9609 sRef Ex@26 @5 S0′ 9609. And fifty loops shalt thou make in the extremity of the curtain that is in the second joining together. That this signifies in like manner reciprocally, is evident without explication.

AC (Potts) n. 9610 sRef Ex@26 @5 S0′ 9610. The loops shall be taken up one to the other. That this signifies complete conjunction on both sides, is evident from the signification of “the loops,” as being conjunction (see n. 9605); and that it is complete on both sides is signified by “the taking up of one by the other” mutually and reciprocally; for when there is a taking up mutually and reciprocally, complete conjunction is effected.

AC (Potts) n. 9611 sRef Ex@26 @6 S0′ 9611. And thou shalt make fifty hooks of gold. That this signifies a full capability of conjunction from good, is evident from the signification of “fifty,” as being what is full (see n. 9608); from the signification of “the hooks,” as being the capability of conjunction, for the capability of conjunction is inherent in them from their form, which is that of something bent backward or curved inward; and from the signification of “gold,” as being good (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 9490, 9510).

AC (Potts) n. 9612 sRef Ex@26 @6 S0′ 9612. And thou shalt join together the curtains one to the other in the hooks. That this signifies the method of the conjunction everywhere, is evident from the signification of “joining together the curtains with the hooks,” as being the method of the conjunction; for when by the “fifty hooks” is signified a full capability of conjunction, then by “joining together the curtains one to the other with the hooks,” is signified the method.

AC (Potts) n. 9613 sRef Ex@26 @6 S0′ 9613. And it shall be one Habitation. That this signifies the whole heaven thus altogether one, is evident from the signification of “the Habitation,” as being heaven (see n. 9594). That heaven is one when it is so conjoined, is manifest; for heaven consists of myriads of angelic societies, and yet the Lord leads them as one angel, or as one man. The reason of this is that among all there is mutual love from the love of the Lord. When this love is among all, and in all, then all can be disposed into a heavenly form, which is such that many are a one, and the more in number they are, the more strongly they are a one. The case herein is like that of the countless things in the human body, which, though distinct and various, yet make a one. The reason is that they are in a form like that of heaven, for the two correspond, as has been shown at the end of many chapters; and from this correspondence they are in mutual love, and in this way are conjoined. Hence it is that the man who is in the good of love and of faith is a heaven in the least form (n. 9279); and that before the Lord the whole heaven is as one man (see n. 9276).
[2] All the conjunction of the countless angelic societies in heaven, together with the methods of their conjunction, was represented in the form of the construction of the Habitation and of the Tent, as treated of in this chapter. But these methods of conjunction, such as they are in heaven, cannot come from this to a man’s idea, for the reason that man does not even know that heaven was represented by the Habitation; and even if he knew this, still he does not know that the heavenly societies have been so joined together by means of love as to represent a one. But all these things flow fully into the idea of the angels, when these things relating to the Habitation are read; for each and all things of the description have an internal sense, which when made manifest by the Lord before the angels, exhibits the state of conjunction together, by means of the love which is from the Lord, of all in the universal heaven.
[3] The conjunction of the angelic societies into one heaven has reference to these laws: 1. Everyone in the form of the heavens comes forth in accordance with the heavenly harmony of many associated together. 2. Love is spiritual conjunction, whence comes heavenly harmony. 3. There must be a universal bond, in order that all the individuals may be held together in conjunction. 4. The universal bond must flow into the individual bonds, and must make them. 5. The universal bond is the Lord, thus love from Him, and consequently love to Him. 6. The individual bonds are derived from this, and are those of mutual love, or of charity toward the neighbor. These are the laws by virtue of which heaven, consisting of innumerable angelic societies, is nevertheless as one man.

AC (Potts) n. 9614 sRef Ex@26 @9 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @8 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @7 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @10 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @12 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @14 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @11 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @13 S0′ 9614. Verses 7-14. And thou shalt make curtains of goats’ [hair] for a Tent over the Habitation, eleven curtains shalt thou make them. The length of one curtain shall be thirty cubits, and the breadth four cubits, for one curtain; one measure for the eleven curtains. And thou shalt join together five curtains by themselves, and six curtains by themselves, and shalt double the sixth curtain over against the faces of the Tent. And thou shalt make fifty loops upon the edge of the one uttermost curtain in the joining, and fifty loops upon the edge of the curtain of the second joining. And thou shalt make fifty hooks of brass, and thou shalt bring the hooks into the loops, and shalt join together the Tent, that it may be one. And that which superaboundeth over and above in the curtains of the Tent, the half of the curtain that is over and above thou shalt make to superabound over the hinder parts of the Habitation. And the cubit on the one side, and the cubit on the other side, in that which is over and above in the length of the curtains of the Tent, shall superabound over the sides of the Habitation on this side and on that, to cover it. And thou shalt make for the Tent a covering of skins of red rams, and a covering of badgers’ skins above. “And thou shalt make curtains of goats’ [hair] for a tent over the Habitation” signifies the external of heaven, which is from the truths that are from external celestial good; “eleven curtains shalt thou make them” signifies all the truths from which it is; “the length of one curtain shall be thirty cubits” signifies the fullness of truth from good; “and the breadth four cubits” signifies the marriage of truth with good; “for one curtain” signifies thus in each of the truths; “one measure for the eleven curtains” signifies a like state of the matter; “and thou shalt join together five curtains by themselves, and six curtains by themselves” signifies the constant communication of truth with good, and of good with truth; “and shalt double the sixth curtain over against the faces of the Tent” signifies the communication of all who are of that heaven with the extremes there, and influx thence into the ultimate heaven; “and thou shalt make fifty loops upon the edge of the one uttermost curtain in the joining” signifies the complete conjunction of one sphere with the other; “and fifty loops upon the edge of the curtain of the second joining” signifies in like manner reciprocally; “and thou shalt make fifty hooks of brass” signifies a full capability of conjunction by external good; “and thou shalt bring the hooks into the loops” signifies the method of the conjunction; “and shalt join together the Tent, that it may be one” signifies the external of heaven thus altogether one; “and that which superaboundeth over and above in the curtains of the Tent” signifies that which proceeds; “the half of the curtain that is over and above, thou shalt make to superabound over the hinder parts of the Habitation” signifies to the ultimate of this heaven; “and the cubit on the one side, and the cubit on the other side, in that which is over and above in the length of the curtains of the Tent, shall superabound over the sides of the habitation, on this side and that, to cover it” signifies the method by which this ultimate proceeds from good, in order that heaven may be rendered safe; “and thou shalt make a covering for the Tent” signifies the circumference of this heaven; “of skins of red rams” signifies external truths from good; “and a covering of badgers’ skins above” signifies outside of these from external good.

AC (Potts) n. 9615 sRef Ex@26 @7 S0′ 9615. And thou shalt make curtains of goats’ [hair] for a Tent over the Habitation. That this signifies the external of heaven which is from the truths that are from external celestial good is evident from the signification of “curtains” as being the interior truths of faith (see n. 9595), here the exterior truths of faith, because they were for the Tent that was over the Habitation; from the signification of “goats’ hair,” of which these curtains were made, as being external celestial good (n. 9470); and from the signification of “the Tent over the Habitation” as being the external of heaven, for by “the Habitation” is signified heaven (n. 9594), and by “the Tent which covered it over,” the external of the same. From this it is plain that by “the curtains of goats’ hair for the Tent over the Habitation,” are signified the truths which are from external celestial good, from which is the external of heaven. But how the case herein is cannot be known unless there is known what is the external and the internal of each heaven, and the influx of one heaven into the other; for the Lord flows into all the heavens both immediately and mediately (see n. 9223); mediately through the inmost heaven into the middle heaven, and through the internal of this latter into its external.

AC (Potts) n. 9616 sRef Ex@26 @7 S0′ 9616. Eleven curtains shalt thou make them. That this signifies all the truths from which it is, is evident from the signification of “eleven,” as being all (of which below); and from the signification of “the curtains of goats’ hair,” as being truths from external celestial good (of which just above, n. 9615). That “eleven” signifies all, is because ten curtains constituted the Tent itself, and the eleventh superabounded as what was over and above upon the hinder parts of the Habitation (as can be seen from verses 9, 12, 13, which follow). That “ten” denotes all, may be seen above (n. 4638, 9595).

AC (Potts) n. 9617 sRef Ex@26 @8 S0′ 9617. The length of one curtain shall be thirty cubits. That this signifies the fullness of truth from good, is evident from the signification of “length,” as being good (see n. 9487); from the signification of a “curtain,” as being truth from external celestial good (n. 9615); and from the signification of “thirty,” as being what is full (n. 9082).

AC (Potts) n. 9618 sRef Ex@26 @8 S0′ 9618. And the breadth four cubits. That this signifies the marriage of truth with good, may be seen above (n. 9601).

AC (Potts) n. 9619 sRef Ex@26 @8 S0′ 9619. For one curtain. That this signifies thus in each of the truths, is evident from the signification of “curtain,” of which also above (n. 9602), where the same words occur.

AC (Potts) n. 9620 sRef Ex@26 @8 S0′ 9620. One measure for the eleven curtains. That this signifies a like state of the matter, is evident from what has been shown above (n. 9603).

AC (Potts) n. 9621 sRef Ex@26 @9 S0′ 9621. And thou shalt join together five curtains by themselves, and six curtains by themselves. That this signifies the constant communication of truth with good, and of good with truth, may be seen above (n. 9604).

AC (Potts) n. 9622 sRef Ex@26 @9 S0′ 9622. And shalt double the sixth curtain over against the faces of the Tent. That this signifies the communication of all who are of this heaven with the extremes there, and influx from thence into the ultimate heaven, is evident from the fact that the doubling of this curtain was an extension over the extremity of the Habitation; for by the curtains and their extension was represented heaven in respect to communication and influx, consequently by the doubling and extension of the sixth curtain over the extremity of the Habitation was represented the communication of all who are of this heaven with the extremes there, and influx thence into the ultimate heaven.

AC (Potts) n. 9623 sRef Ex@26 @10 S0′ 9623. And thou shalt make fifty loops upon the edge of the one uttermost curtain in the joining. That this signifies the complete conjunction of one sphere with the other; and that “fifty loops upon the edge of the curtain of the second joining,” signifies in like manner reciprocally, is evident from what has been shown above (n. 9605-9609).

AC (Potts) n. 9624 sRef Ex@26 @11 S0′ 9624. And thou shalt make fifty hooks of brass. That this signifies a full capability of conjunction by external good, is evident from the signification of “fifty hooks,” as being a full capability of conjunction (of which above, n. 9611); and from the signification of “brass,” as being natural or external good (n. 425, 1551).

AC (Potts) n. 9625 sRef Ex@26 @11 S0′ 9625. And thou shalt bring the hooks into the loops. That this signifies the method of the conjunction, is evident from the fact that when by “the hooks” is signified the capability of conjunction (of which just above, n. 9624), by “bringing them into the loops,” and thereby joining the curtains together, is signified the method of the conjunction, as also by “joining the curtains together one to the other with the hooks” (n. 9612).

AC (Potts) n. 9626 sRef Ex@26 @11 S0′ 9626. And shalt join the Tent together, that it may be one. That this signifies the external of heaven thus altogether one, is evident from the signification of “the Tent,” as being the external of heaven (see n. 9615); that it denotes thus altogether one, may be seen above (n. 9613), where the Habitation is treated of, by which is signified the internal of heaven.

AC (Potts) n. 9627 sRef Ex@26 @12 S0′ 9627. And that which superaboundeth over and above in the curtains of the Tent. That this signifies that which proceeds, is evident from the signification of “that which superaboundeth over and above,” as being that which proceeds (of which in what follows); and from the signification of “the curtains of the Tent,” as being the truths from external celestial good that constitute the external of heaven, which is signified by “the Tent” (see n. 9615). That “that which superaboundeth over and above the curtains” denotes that which proceeds, is because it proceeds by continuity from the expansion itself.

AC (Potts) n. 9628 sRef Ex@26 @12 S0′ 9628. The half of the curtain that is over and above, thou shalt make to superabound over the hinder parts of the Habitation. That this signifies that which proceeds to the ultimate of heaven, is evident from the signification of “that which superaboundeth,” as being that which proceeds (see just above, n. 9627); and from the signification of “the hinder parts of the Habitation,” as being the ultimate of heaven, for “the Habitation” denotes heaven, which is here treated of.

AC (Potts) n. 9629 sRef Ex@26 @13 S0′ 9629. And the cubit on the one side, and the cubit on the other side, in that which is over and above in the length of the curtains of the Tent, shall superabound over the sides of the Habitation on this side and on that, to cover it. That this signifies the method by which this ultimate proceeds from good, in order that heaven may be rendered safe, is evident from the signification of “that which superaboundeth over the sides of the Habitation, a cubit on the one side and a cubit on the other side,” as being the ultimate which proceeds (of which above, n. 9627); from the signification of “the length of the curtains of the Tent,” as being truths from good (n. 9617); and from the signification of “to cover,” as being to protect, for that which covers protects from the assailing evil that would inflict injury. From these significations gathered into one, there results this meaning, that this ultimate which proceeds from good is for the purpose that heaven may be rendered safe.

AC (Potts) n. 9630 sRef Ex@26 @14 S0′ 9630. And thou shalt make a covering for the Tent. That this signifies the circumference, is evident without explication, for the covering made of skins of red rams formed a circumference above and around the Tent.

AC (Potts) n. 9631 sRef Ex@26 @14 S0′ 9631. Of skins of red rams. That this signifies external truths from good, is evident from what has already been said and shown concerning the skins of red rams (n. 9471).

AC (Potts) n. 9632 sRef Ex@26 @14 S0′ 9632. And a covering of badgers’ skins above. That this signifies outside of this, namely the circumference from the truths which are from external good, is evident from the signification of “the covering,” as being the circumference (as just above, n. 9630); from the signification of “skins,” as being external truths (n. 9471); and from the signification of “badgers,” as being goods (also n. 9471). It is needless to further unfold the things thus far said concerning the Habitation, the Tent, and the two coverings of the latter, because they are of such a nature as by reason of ignorance would fall with difficulty into the idea of thought; for where there is ignorance there is blindness, thus no reception of light, and consequently no idea of the subject. For few if any know that heaven is represented and thus described by the Habitation, and its external by the Tent with its two coverings. The reason why these things are unknown, is that scarcely anyone knows that heavenly things are signified by all those which are in the Word, thus that there is an internal sense which is spiritual in each thing therein; and that this sense does not appear in the letter, but only from the letter to those who have been instructed about correspondences, and who while they read the Word are in enlightenment from the Lord.
[2] Nay, scarcely anyone knows that the man who is in the good of love and of faith is a heaven in the least form, and that such a man, both as to his interiors and his exteriors, corresponds to heaven (n. 9276). If these things had been known, the well-informed in the Christian world, who have acquired some knowledge of the forms of the human body, might have been in some intellectual light, and consequently in some idea about heaven, and then might have apprehended what things in heaven are represented by the ark, its propitiatory [mercy seat], and the cherubs over it; what by the table upon which were the breads of faces, and by the lampstand, and by the golden altar of incense; also what things are represented by the Habitation, its curtains, planks, and bases; and further by the Tent and its two coverings; for like things occur with man, in his internals and in his externals, and they are also presented in a material form in his body, to which these internal things exactly correspond. For unless the external things which are of the body exactly corresponded to the internal things which are of the understanding and the will, there would not be any life in the body, and consequently there would not be any corresponding acts.
[3] It is said that like things occur in the tabernacle as in man, because the representatives in nature bear relation to the human form, and have a signification according to their relation to it (n. 9496). There are four coverings in man’s external things that encompass and enclose all the interior things, and which are called coats and skins. To what internal things these correspond may be seen from experience (n. 5552-5559, 8980). Similar things were represented in the coverings which constituted the expanse of the tabernacle. From this the understanding may borrow some light concerning the forms of heaven; and yet this light would be extinguished with all those who have not a distinct knowledge of the things that are in the human body, and who have not at the same time a distinct knowledge of the spiritual things of faith and the celestial things of love, to which these things correspond. As with most people both the latter and the former things are in shade, nay, in thick darkness, not only from the lack of knowledge, but also from lack of faith, it is needless to unfold them further; for, as before said, they would not fall into any idea, because of the lack of intellectual light on such subjects.

AC (Potts) n. 9633 sRef Ex@26 @18 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @23 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @17 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @16 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @21 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @15 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @19 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @20 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @26 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @25 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @27 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @29 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @28 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @30 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @22 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @24 S0′ 9633. Verses 15-30. And thou shalt make the planks for the Habitation of shittim wood, standing up. Ten cubits shall be the length of a plank, and a cubit and half a cubit the breadth of one plank. Two hands shall there be in one plank, combined one to the other; thus shalt thou make for all the planks of the Habitation. And thou shalt make the planks for the Habitation twenty planks for the corner of the south toward the south. And thou shalt make forty bases of silver under the twenty planks; two bases under one plank for its two hands, and two bases under one plank for its two hands. And for the other side of the Habitation, at the corner of the north, twenty planks; and their forty bases of silver; two bases under one plank, and two bases under one plank. And for the two legs of the Habitation toward the sea thou shalt make six planks. And two planks shalt thou make for the corners of the Habitation in the two legs. And they shall be twinned from beneath, and they shall be twinned together at the head of it unto one ring; thus shall it be for them both; they shall be at the two corners. And there shall be eight planks, and their bases of silver, sixteen bases; two bases under one plank, and two bases under one plank. And thou shalt make bars of shittim wood; five for the planks of the one side of the Habitation, and five bars for the planks of the other side of the Habitation, and five bars for the planks of the side of the Habitation at the two legs toward the sea. And the middle bar in the middle of the planks shall pass through from extremity to extremity. And thou shalt overlay the planks with gold, and make their rings of gold, houses for the bars; and thou shalt overlay the bars with gold. And thou shalt set up the Habitation according to the method which thou wast made to see in the mountain. “And thou shalt make the planks for the Habitation” signifies the good which supports this heaven; “of shittim wood” signifies that it is the good of merit from the Lord’s Divine Human; “ten cubits shall be the length of a plank” signifies this good the all in all; “and a cubit and half a cubit the breadth of one plank” signifies the truth from which it conjoins, as much as is sufficient; “two hands shall there be in one plank” signifies power from it; “combined one to the other” signifies the consequent conjunction of the Lord with those who are in this heaven; “thus shalt thou make for all the planks of the Habitation” signifies thus everywhere; “and thou shalt make the planks for the Habitation twenty” signifies the good which supports heaven in every way and completely; “the planks for the corner of the south toward the south” signifies even into its interior and inmost things where truth is in light; “and thou shalt make forty bases of silver” signifies a full support by means of truth; “under the twenty planks” signifies which proceeds from the good that is from the Lord’s Divine Human; “two bases under one plank” signifies its conjunction with good; “for its two hands” signifies the consequent power; “and two bases under one plank for its two hands” signifies thus in each and all things; “and for the other side of the Habitation, at the corner of the north” signifies toward the exteriors of this heaven where truth is in obscurity; “twenty planks” signifies the good which supports in every way and completely; “and their forty bases of silver” signifies there also a full support by means of truth; “two bases under one plank” signifies through conjunction with good; “and two bases under one plank” signifies everywhere; “and for the two legs of the Habitation toward the sea” signifies conjunction with heaven where good is in obscurity; “thou shalt make six planks” signifies where good from the Lord’s Divine Human is wholly; “and two planks shalt thou make for the corners of the Habitation in the two legs” signifies the quality of the conjunction there with good; “and they shall be twinned from beneath, and they shall be twinned together at the head of it” signifies conjunction from the exterior and from the interior; “unto one ring” signifies thus endurance; “thus shall it be for them both; they shall be at the two corners” signifies a like conjunction everywhere; “and there shall be eight planks, and their bases of silver” signifies support in every way by good through the truth which is from good; “sixteen bases” signifies complete support; “two bases under one plank, and two bases under one plank” signifies through the conjunction of truth with good everywhere; “and thou shalt make bars of shittim wood” signifies the power of truth from good; “five for the planks of the one side of the Habitation” signifies whereby it looks toward the interiors of heaven where truth is in light; “and five bars for the planks of the other side of the Habitation” signifies the power of truth from good whereby it looks toward the exteriors where truth is in obscurity; “and five bars for the planks of the side of the Habitation at the two legs toward the sea” signifies the power of truth from good whereby it looks toward this heaven where there is conjunction with good which is in obscurity; “and the middle bar in the middle of the planks shall pass through from extremity to extremity” signifies the primary power from which the powers are everywhere continued; “and thou shalt overlay the planks with gold, and make their rings of gold, houses for the bars, and thou shalt overlay the bars with gold” signifies a representative of good from which and through which are all things; “and thou shalt set up the Habitation according to the method which thou wast made to see in the mountain” signifies toward the quarters according to the states of good and of the derivative truth in the heaven which is represented.

AC (Potts) n. 9634 sRef Ex@26 @15 S0′ 9634. And thou shalt make the planks for the Habitation. That this signifies the good which supports this heaven is evident from the signification of “the planks” as being the good which supports (of which below); and from the signification of “the Habitation” as being the middle or second heaven (see n. 9594). That “the planks” denote the good which supports, is because they were of wood, and supported the curtains of both the Habitation and the Tent, and also the two coverings over them. Consequently by “the planks” are signified supports, and because they were of wood, they signified supports which are from good; for everything that is of wood signifies good, even to the very houses that are of wood (n. 3720); the quality of the good is signified by the “shittim wood” of which the planks were made. As all the representatives in nature bear relation to the human form, and have a signification in accordance with this relation (n. 9496), so also do the planks of the Habitation. These planks correspond to the muscular or fleshy part in man, which supports the encompassing membranes and skins; by “flesh” also is signified good (n. 7850, 9127). From this it is that the planks were of shittim wood, by which is signified the good which supports heaven (n. 9472, 9486); also that they were overlaid with gold, by which also is signified good.

AC (Potts) n. 9635 sRef Ex@26 @15 S0′ 9635. Of shittim wood. That this signifies the good of merit from the Lord’s Divine Human, is evident from the signification of “shittim wood,” as being the good of merit from the Lord’s Divine Human (see n. 9472, 9486). (That this good is the only good which reigns in heaven, and supports it, see n. 9486.)

AC (Potts) n. 9636 sRef Ex@26 @16 S0′ 9636. Ten cubits shall be the length of a plank. That this signifies this good the all in all, is evident from the signification of “ten,” as being all (see n. 4638, 9595); and from the signification of “length,” as being good (n. 1613, 8898, 9487, 9600), here the good which supports, which is the good of merit; for this is signified by the planks of the Habitation being made of shittim wood (n. 9635). That this good is the all in all of heaven, is because this good is the very Divine good which makes the heavens and sustains them (n. 9486); for the good which is with the angels is good itself, because all good is from the Lord; good from any other source is not good.

AC (Potts) n. 9637 sRef Ex@26 @16 S0′ 9637. And a cubit and half a cubit the breadth of one plank. That this signifies the truth from it which conjoins, as much as is sufficient, is evident from the signification of “one and a half,” as being what is full (see n. 9487-9489), thus also as much as is sufficient, for this is what is full. The reason why this truth is from it, that is, from the good which is signified by “the planks of shittim wood” (n. 9634, 9635), is that every good has its truth, and every truth its good. Good without truth does not appear, and truth without good does not exist, for truth is the form of good, and good is the being of truth. It is from form that good appears, and it is from being that truth exists. The case herein is like that of flame and light; flame without light does not appear, and therefore it emits from itself light that it may appear; and light without flame does not exist. It is the same with man’s will and his understanding; the will does not appear without the understanding, and the understanding does not exist without the will. As it is with good and truth, or with flame and light, or again with the will and understanding, even so it is with love and faith, for all good is of love, and all truth is of faith from love; and man’s will has been allotted to the reception of the good which is of love, and his understanding to the reception of the truth which is of faith. Moreover, love is the flame or fire of life, and faith is the light of life.

AC (Potts) n. 9638 sRef Ex@26 @17 S0′ 9638. Two hands shall there be in one plank. That this signifies power from it, namely, through truth from good, is evident from the signification of “hands,” as being power (see n. 878, 3387, 4931-4937, 5327, 5328, 6292, 6947, 7011, 7188, 7189, 7518, 7673, 8050, 8153, 8281, 9133; and that all power is through truth from good, n. 6344, 6423, 9327, 9410).

AC (Potts) n. 9639 sRef Ex@26 @17 S0′ 9639. Combined the one to the other. That this signifies the consequent conjunction of the Lord with those who are in this heaven, is evident from the signification of “to be combined,” when said of the power which is signified by “the hands,” as being conjunction through truth from good. For all who are in heaven are called “powers,” and also are powers, from the fact that they are receptions of the Divine truth which is from the Lord; therefore also by “angels” in the Word are signified truths Divine (see n. 8192). It is the Divine good proceeding from the Lord that conjoins all in heaven; for it is the Divine good that reigns universally in Divine truths, and that which reigns universally, conjoins. This conjunction is what is signified by the “combining of the hands of each plank the one to the other.”

AC (Potts) n. 9640 sRef Ex@26 @17 S0′ 9640. Thus shalt thou make for all the planks of the Habitation. That this signifies thus everywhere, is evident from the signification of ” all,” when said of heaven, as being everywhere, for that which is done there to all is done everywhere; and from the signification of “the planks of the Habitation,” as being the good which supports heaven (see n. 9634).

AC (Potts) n. 9641 sRef Ex@26 @18 S0′ 9641. And thou shalt make the planks for the Habitation twenty. That this signifies good which supports heaven in every way and completely, is evident from the signification of “the planks of the Habitation,” as being the good which supports heaven (see n. 9634); and from the signification of “twenty,” as being what is full, thus in every way and completely. That “twenty” has this signification, is because numbers formed by multiplication have the same signification as the simple numbers from which they have been multiplied (n. 5291, 5335, 5708, 7973); thus the number “twenty” signifies the same as “ten,” and “two,” from the multiplication of which it arises. (That “ten” denotes what is full, and all, see n. 3107, 4638; and in like manner “two,” n. 9103, 9166.)

AC (Potts) n. 9642 sRef Ex@26 @18 S0′ 9642. The planks for the corner of the south toward the south. That this signifies even into its interior and inmost things where truth is in light, is evident from the signification of “the planks of the Habitation,” as being the good which supports heaven (see n. 9634); from the signification of a “corner,” when said of the quarters of the world, as being where that state is which is marked out and signified by the quarter (of which in what follows); and from the signification of “the south toward the south,” as being the interior and inmost things where truth is in its light; for by “the south” is signified a state of light, which is a state of intelligence from truths, and thus an interior state; for light (and with the light intelligence and wisdom) in the heavens, increases toward more interior things; and farther from these truth is in shade, which state of truth is signified by “the north.” From this then it is that by “the corner of the south toward the south” is signified even to the interior and inmost things where truth is in light.
sRef Isa@43 @6 S2′ [2] The same is signified by “the south” or “noonday” in Isaiah:
I will say to the north, Give up; and to the south, Keep not back; bring My sons from far, and My daughters from the end of the earth (Isa. 43:6).
In this passage a new church is treated of; “saying to the north” denotes to those who are in darkness or ignorance concerning the truths of faith, who are the nations outside the church; “saying to the south” denotes to those who are in light from the knowledges of good and truth, who are those who are within the church; wherefore it is said to the latter that they should “not keep back,” but to the former that they should “give up.”
sRef Ezek@21 @4 S3′ sRef Ezek@20 @46 S3′ sRef Ezek@20 @47 S3′ sRef Ezek@21 @5 S3′ sRef Ezek@20 @48 S3′ sRef Ezek@20 @49 S3′ sRef Ezek@21 @1 S3′ sRef Ezek@21 @2 S3′ sRef Ezek@21 @3 S3′ [3] In Ezekiel:
Set thy faces toward the south, and drop toward the south, and prophesy against the forest of the field unto the south; and say to the forest of the south, Behold, I kindle a fire in thee, and it shall devour every green tree in thee, and all faces from the south to the north shall be burned. Set thy faces toward Jerusalem, and drop against the holy places, and prophesy against the land of Israel (Ezek. 20:46, 47; 21:2).
“The south” here denotes those who are in the light of truth from the Word, thus those who are of the church, but who are in falsities which they confirm from the sense of the letter of the Word wrongly unfolded; whence it is said, “the forest of the field unto the south,” and “the forest of the south.” A “forest” denotes where memory-knowledge reigns; but a “garden,” where truth reigns. From this it is plain what is signified by “setting the faces toward the south, and dropping [words] toward the south, and prophesying against the forest of the field unto the south;” and afterward by “setting the faces toward Jerusalem, and dropping against the holy places, and prophesying against the land of Israel; for “Jerusalem” and “the land of Israel” denote the church, and “the holy places” there denote the things which are of the church.
sRef Amos@8 @9 S4′ sRef Jer@6 @4 S4′ sRef Isa@58 @10 S4′ sRef Isa@16 @3 S4′ [4] In Isaiah:
If thou draw out thy soul to the hungry, and sate the afflicted soul; then thy light shall arise in darkness, and thy thick darkness shall be as the noonday (Isa. 58:10);
where “darkness” and “thick darkness” denote ignorance of truth and good; while “light” and “the noonday” denote the understanding of them. Again:
Bring forth counsel, execute judgment; make thy shadow like the night in the midst of the noonday; hide the outcasts; reveal not the wanderer (Isa. 16:3);
where “in the midst of the noonday” denotes in the midst of the light of truth. In Jeremiah:
Sanctify ye the battle against the daughter of Zion; arise, and let us go up into the south, for the day is going away, for the shadows of the evening have been bent down (Jer. 6:4);
where “going up into the south” denotes against the church, in which truth is in light from the Word. In Amos:
I will make the sun go down at noon, and I will darken the earth in the day of light (Amos 8:9);
denoting the extinguishing of all the light of truth from the Word.
sRef Ps@91 @6 S5′ sRef Ps@91 @5 S5′ sRef Isa@21 @1 S5′ [5] In David:
Thou shalt not be afraid for the dread of night, nor for the arrow that flieth by day; for the pestilence in the thick darkness, for the death that wasteth at noonday (Ps. 91:5, 6);
“the dread of night” denotes the falsities of evil which are from hell; “the arrow that flieth by day,” the falsity which is openly taught; “the death that wasteth at noonday,” the evil which is openly lived in, whereby truth is destroyed where it can be in its light from the Word.
sRef Dan@8 @10 S6′ sRef Dan@8 @9 S6′ sRef Dan@8 @8 S6′ [6] Again:
The prophecy of the wilderness of the sea. As whirlwinds from the south, to pass through; it cometh from the wilderness, from a terrible land (Isa. 21:1).
The he-goat of the goats magnified himself exceedingly; and his horn grew toward the south, and toward the east, and toward comeliness; and it grew even unto the army of the heavens, and some of the army and of the stars it cast down to the earth, and trampled upon them (Dan. 8:8-10).
The subject here treated of is the state of the future church, and it is foretold that the church will perish through the doctrine of faith separated from the good of charity; “the he-goat of the goats” denotes such a faith (n. 4169, 4769); its “horn growing toward the south” denotes the power of falsity therefrom against truths; “toward the east” denotes against goods; “toward comeliness” denotes against the church; “unto the army of the heavens” denotes against all the goods and truths of heaven; “casting down to the earth some of the army and of the stars” denotes to destroy these goods and truths, and the very knowledges of good and truth (n. 4697).
[7] In the same prophet is described a war between the king of the south and the king of the north (chap. 11), and by “the king of the south” is signified the light of truth from the Word, and by “the king of the north” reasoning from memory-knowledges about truths; the alternations that the church was to undergo until it should perish, are described by the various events of this war.
sRef Num@2 @11 S8′ sRef Num@2 @13 S8′ sRef Num@2 @15 S8′ sRef Num@2 @14 S8′ sRef Num@2 @12 S8′ sRef Num@2 @10 S8′ [8] As “the south” signified truth in light, it was ordained that the tribes of Reuben, Simeon, and Gad should encamp “toward the south” (Num. 2:10-15); the encampments represented the setting in order of all things in the heavens in accordance with the truths and goods of faith and love (see n. 4236, 8103, 8193, 8196); and “the twelve tribes” which encamped signified all truths and goods in the complex (n. 3858, 3862, 3926, 3939, 4060, 6335, 6337, 6397, 6640, 7836, 7891, 7996, 7997); by “the tribe of Reuben” was signified the truth of faith in doctrine (n. 3861, 3866, 5542); by “the tribe of Simeon,” the derivative truth of faith in life (n. 3869-3872, 4497, 4502, 4503, 5482); and by “the tribe of Gad” were signified works from these truths (n. 6404, 6405). This shows why these tribes were encamped “toward the south;” for all things of truth, that is, of faith, belong to “the south,” because they belong to light.
sRef Rev@20 @7 S9′ sRef Ezek@37 @9 S9′ sRef Matt@24 @31 S9′ sRef Rev@20 @8 S9′ sRef Rev@7 @1 S9′ [9] From all this it is now evident what is signified by “the corner of the south,” namely, where the state of truth is in light. For all states of the good of love and of the truth of faith are signified by “the four corners of the earth”-states of the good of love by “the corner of the east, and the corner of the west,” and states of the truth of faith by “the corner of the south,” and “the corner of the north.” In like manner by “the four winds” in these passages:
Angels standing on the four corners of the earth, holding back the four winds of the earth, that the wind should not blow on the earth (Rev. 7:1).
Satan shall go forth to seduce the nations which are in the four corners of the earth (Rev. 20:8).
He shall send His angels, and they shall gather together His elect from the four winds, from the ends of the heavens to the ends of them (Matt. 24:31).
Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe into these slain, that they may live (Ezek. 37:9).
[10] As by these “winds,” that is, by these “quarters,” were signified all things of good and of truth, thus all things of heaven and of the church, and by “the temple” was signified heaven or the church, therefore it has been customary from ancient times to place temples in an east and west direction, because “the east” signified the good of love in its rising, and “the west,” the good of love in its going down. This had its origin from the representatives in which were the ancients who belonged to the church.

AC (Potts) n. 9643 sRef Ex@26 @19 S0′ 9643. And thou shalt make forty bases of silver. That this signifies full support by means of truth, is evident from the signification of “forty,” as being what is full (see n. 9437); from the signification of “bases,” as being support, for bases support; and from the signification of “silver,” as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658, 6112, 6914, 6917, 7999). The reason why the bases were of “silver,” and the planks were overlaid with “gold,” was that by the “planks” is signified good, and by the “bases” truth, and good has power and thus support through truth (that good has power through truth, see n. 6344, 6423, 9327, 9410; also that “gold” signifies good, and “silver” truth, n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 8932, 9490, 9510). That good has power through truth, is because truth is the form of good, and good has quality thereby; for where there is quality, there is form. In this way good has that whereby it can work on other things in this or in that manner. From this it is that good has ability, but not determined to anything except by means of truth. Ability determined is actual power, consequently is supporting power.
[2] Moreover, the bases correspond to the feet and soles of the feet in man; and in general to the bones which support all the fleshy part of the body; and by “the feet” and “the bones” in like manner is signified the truth which supports; and by “the fleshy part” in the body is signified the good which supports itself by means of truth. (That all things in nature bear relation to the human form, and have a signification in accordance with their relation to it, see n. 9496; also that “flesh” signifies good, n. 3813, 6968, 7850, 9127; that “the feet” denote what is natural, thus truth in power from good, n. 5327, 5328; that “the body” signifies good, n. 6135; and “the bones,” truth supporting, n. 3812e, 8005.)
sRef Isa@24 @18 S3′ sRef Ps@18 @7 S3′ sRef Ps@82 @5 S3′ sRef Ps@18 @15 S3′ sRef Isa@40 @21 S3′ [3] It is for this reason also that a “foundation,” which is a common base, denotes the truth of faith, and faith itself, as can be seen from the passages in the Word where a “foundation” is spoken of; as in Isaiah:
Do ye not know? Do ye not hear? Do ye not understand the foundations of the earth? (Isa. 40:21).
He who does not know what is signified by a “foundation,” and what by “the earth,” has no other idea than that the lowest parts of the earth are here meant by “the foundations of the earth,” although he may perceive, if he pays attention, that something else is meant; for what would it be to know, to hear, and to understand the foundations of the earth ? From this it can be seen that by “the foundations of the earth” are signified such things as belong to the church. That “the earth” in the Word denotes the church, is very evident from the passages in the Word where “the earth” is mentioned (see what has been cited above, n. 9325); and that its “foundations” denote the truths of faith, for these truths serve the church for foundations, as can also be seen further from the following passages. In David:
They acknowledge not, neither do they understand; they walk in darkness; all the foundations of the earth totter (Ps. 82:5);
that the foundations of the earth do not “totter,” but the truths of the church with those who do not know, who do not understand, and who walk in darkness, is clear. Again:
The earth was shaken and quaked, and the foundations of the mountains were agitated, and were shaken (Ps. 18:7);
where “mountains” denote the goods of love (n. 795, 4210, 6435, 8327), and their “foundations,” the truths of faith. And in Isaiah:
The cataracts from on high have been opened, and the foundations of the earth have quaked (Isa. 24:18);
As a “foundation” denotes the truth of faith, and a “city,” the doctrine of it, therefore in the Word “the foundations of the city” is said when the truth of doctrine is meant; as in David:
The channels of waters appeared, and the foundations of the city* were uncovered, by the rebuke of Jehovah (Ps. 18:15).
(That a “city” denotes the doctrine of truth, see n. 402, 2449, 2943, 3216, 4492, 4493).
sRef Rev@21 @20 S4′ sRef Rev@21 @19 S4′ sRef Rev@21 @15 S4′ sRef Rev@21 @14 S4′ sRef Rev@21 @17 S4′ sRef Rev@21 @16 S4′ sRef Rev@21 @18 S4′ [4] From this it can be seen what is signified by “the foundations of the city of the holy Jerusalem” in John:
The wall of the city of the holy Jerusalem had twelve foundations, and in them the names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb. The foundations of the wall were adorned with every precious stone (Rev. 21:14-20).
He who does not know what is signified by “the holy Jerusalem,” what by a “city,” what by a “wall,” what by a “foundation,” and what by “the twelve apostles,” can see nothing of the secret here hidden; when yet by “the holy Jerusalem” is meant the New Church of the Lord which will succeed this of ours; by “the city” is meant doctrine; by a “wall,” the truth protecting and defending; by “the foundations,” the truths of faith; and by “the twelve apostles,” all the goods of love and truths of faith in the complex. From this it can be seen why it is said that there will be “twelve foundations,” and that they will be “adorned with every precious stone; for a “precious stone” denotes the truth of faith from the good of love (n. 114, 3858, 6640, 9476); and “the twelve apostles” denote all things of love and faith in the complex (n. 3488, 3858, 6397).
sRef Jer@51 @26 S5′ sRef Isa@54 @11 S5′ sRef Isa@30 @31 S5′ sRef Isa@30 @32 S5′ [5] From this it is evident what is here signified by “foundations” in Isaiah:
Behold, I set thy stones with antimony,** and lay thy foundations with sapphires (Isa. 54:11);
where “sapphires” denote interior truths (n. 9407). In the same:
Jehovah shall smite Asshur with a rod. Then shall be every passing of the rod of the foundation, upon which Jehovah shall cause him to rest (Isa. 30:31, 32);
“the rod of the foundation” denotes the power of truth (that a “rod” denotes power, see n. 4013, 4015, 4876, 4936, 6947, 7011, 7026). And in Jeremiah:
They shall not take from thee a stone for a corner, nor a stone of foundations (Jer. 51:26);
where “a stone of foundations” denotes the truths of faith.
sRef Job@38 @4 S6′ sRef Job@38 @5 S6′ sRef Job@38 @7 S6′ sRef Job@38 @6 S6′ [6] In Job:
Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth? Declare if thou knowest intelligence; who hath appointed the measures thereof, if thou knowest? Upon what were its bases? or who laid the cornerstone thereof? when the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God sounded (Job 38:4-7)?
He who does not know what is signified in the internal sense by “the earth,” by “the measures thereof,” and by “the bases,” also what by a “cornerstone,” “morning stars,” and “the sons of God,” sees nothing of the secret therein, believing that it is the earth which is meant, and also its foundation, measures, bases, and corner stone; and knowing not at all what is signified by “the morning stars singing,” and by “the sons of God sounding.” But he will come out of darkness into light as soon as he knows that “the earth” denotes the church; that its “foundations” denote the truth of faith; its “measures,” states of good and truth; its “bases,” the supporting truths themselves; “the cornerstone,” the power of truth; “the morning stars,” the knowledges of good and truth derived from good; and “the sons of God,” truths Divine. The latter are said “to sound” when they come into existence, and the former “to sing” when they arise.
* Here urbis, city; but in n. 8286 and 9818, orbis, world.
** In n. 1298, “carbuncle.”

AC (Potts) n. 9644 sRef Ex@26 @19 S0′ 9644. Under the twenty planks. That this signifies which proceeds from the good that is from the Lord’s Divine Human, is evident from the signification of “twenty,” as being what is full, thus in every way and completely (see n. 9641); and from the signification of “the planks of the Habitation,” as being the good which supports heaven (n. 9634). (That this good is the good of merit, thus the good of the Lord’s Divine Human, see n. 7850, 9127; also that this is the only good which reigns in heaven, n. 9486.) That the truth signified by “the bases” is what proceeds from this good, is signified by the bases being “under the planks.”

AC (Potts) n. 9645 sRef Ex@26 @19 S0′ 9645. Two bases under one plank. That this signifies the conjunction of this truth with good, is evident from the signification of “two,” as being conjunction (see n. 5194, 8423); from the signification of “bases,” as being the truth by means of which there is support (n. 9643); and from the signification of a “plank,” as being the good which supports (as just above, n. 9644).

AC (Potts) n. 9646 sRef Ex@26 @19 S0′ 9646. For its two hands. That this signifies the consequent power, is evident from the signification of “hands,” as being power (see n. 9638).

AC (Potts) n. 9647 sRef Ex@26 @19 S0′ 9647. And two bases under one plank for its two hands. That this signifies thus in each and all things, is evident from the fact that such bases and hands were to be applied to every plank, as is involved in the repetition; and therefore the signification is that so it should be in all things. Be it known that with man and angel, good together with its truths is like itself in every particular such as it is in general (see n. 920, 1040, 1316, 4345), thus in each and all things.

AC (Potts) n. 9648 sRef Ex@26 @20 S0′ 9648. And for the other side of the Habitation at the corner of the north. That this signifies toward the exteriors of this heaven where truths are in obscurity, is evident from the signification of “the Habitation,” as being heaven (see n. 9594); and from the signification of “the north,” as being the exteriors in which truth is in obscurity (n. 3708). From this it is plain that by “the side of the Habitation at the corner of the north,” is signified toward the exteriors of heaven, where truth is in obscurity. There are four states to which the four quarters in the world, namely, the east, the west, the south, and the north, correspond. The east corresponds to a state of good in its rising, the west to a state of good in its going down; the south corresponds to a state of truth in its light; and the north to a state of truth in shade (n. 3708). The state of good to which the east corresponds, and the state of truth to which the south corresponds, are interior states; and the state of good to which the west corresponds, and the state of truth to which the north corresponds, are exterior; for the more interior any state is, the more perfect it is; and the more exterior it is, the more imperfect, thus the more obscure. It is for this reason that the higher a man can be raised toward interior things, the more he comes into the perception of good, and into the light of truth; and therefore when a man puts off bodily things, which are the veriest external things, as is the case when he departs out of the world; if he has lived a life of truth and good he comes into intelligence and wisdom, and thus into the perception of every happiness; and into a perception the greater, in proportion as through a life of good from the doctrine of truth he has suffered himself to be raised toward the interior things of heaven.

AC (Potts) n. 9649 sRef Ex@26 @20 S0′ 9649. Twenty planks. That this signifies the good which supports in every way and completely, is evident from the signification of “twenty,” as being in every way and completely (see n. 9641); and from the signification of “the planks of the Habitation,” as being the good which supports heaven (n. 9634).

AC (Potts) n. 9650 sRef Ex@26 @21 S0′ 9650. And their forty bases of silver. This signifies there also a full support by means of truth (as above, n. 9643).

AC (Potts) n. 9651 sRef Ex@26 @21 S0′ 9651. Two bases under one plank. This signifies through conjunction with good (as also above, n. 9645).

AC (Potts) n. 9652 sRef Ex@26 @21 S0′ 9652. And two bases under one plank. This signifies everywhere, because in each and all things (n. 9647); for that which is in each and all things is everywhere.

AC (Potts) n. 9653 sRef Ex@26 @22 S0′ 9653. And for the two legs of the Habitation toward the sea. That this signifies conjunction with heaven where good is in obscurity, is evident from the signification of “two,” as being conjunction (see n. 9645); from the signification of “the legs,” as being the bounds where good verges to obscurity (n. 7859); from the signification of “the Habitation,” as being heaven (n. 9594); and from the signification of “the west” or “the sea,” as being a state of good in obscurity (see n. 3708, 8615). That this state is signified by “the west,” is because by “the sun” is signified the Lord as to the good of love (n. 3636, 3643, 4060, 4321, 7078, 7083, 7171, 8644, 8812). Hence by “the rising of the sun” is signified the good of love from the Lord in clear perception, and by its “setting,” good from Him in obscure perception. And because man and angel have clear perception when raised toward interior things, that is, into the light of heaven, and obscure perception when in exterior things (n. 9648), thus when in the light of the world, therefore the west is also called “the sea;” for “the sea” signifies memory-knowledge in general (n. 28, 2850), and memory-knowledge is in the external or natural man, where good is in obscurity. All memory-knowledge, being of the natural man, is in the light of the world.

AC (Potts) n. 9654 sRef Ex@26 @22 S0′ 9654. Thou shalt make six planks. That this signifies where good from the Lord’s Divine Human is wholly, is evident from the signification of “six,” as being all things in the complex (see n. 7973), thus wholly; and from the signification of “the planks of the Habitation,” as being good from the Lord’s Divine Human which supports heaven (n. 9644).

AC (Potts) n. 9655 sRef Ex@26 @23 S0′ 9655. And two planks shalt thou make for the corners of the Habitation in the two legs. That this signifies the quality of the conjunction there with good, is evident from what follows, where it is said that the planks there “shall be twinned from beneath,” and at the same time “twinned at the head of it unto one corner,” which denotes the quality of the conjunction there with good; for by “two” is signified conjunction (see n. 9645); by “planks,” the good which supports (n. 9634); and by “the corners of the Habitation in the two legs,” the bounds where this good is (n. 9653).

AC (Potts) n. 9656 sRef Ex@26 @24 S0′ 9656. And they shall be twinned from beneath, and they shall be twinned together at the head of it. That this signifies conjunction from the exterior and from the interior, is evident from the signification of “being twinned,” as being to be acted upon conjointly; from the signification of “from beneath,” as being from the exterior (for that which is outside is expressed in the Word by “beneath,” and that which is within by “above,” see n. 3084, 4599, 5146, 8325, whence things deep down denote exterior things, and high things denote interior things, n. 2148, 4210, 4599); and from the signification of “the head,” when it is said “from beneath unto the head,” as being from the interior. That this is signified by “the head” is because the head is above the body, and as just said, by higher things are signified interior things. And besides, the interior things of man are in his head; for in the head are the beginnings of the senses and of motions, and the beginnings are the inmost things, because from them the rest are derived, the beginnings being like the veins yielding springs, from which are brooks.
sRef Isa@9 @15 S2′ sRef Isa@19 @15 S2′ sRef Isa@9 @14 S2′ [2] It is for this reason also that interior things are expressed in the Word by “the head;” as in these passages:
Jehovah will cut off from Israel head and tail, branch and rush, in one day (Isa. 9:14).
Neither shall there be for Egypt any work, which head and tail, branch and rush, may do (Isa. 19:15).
In these passages the subject treated of is the church, the interiors of which are “the head,” and the exteriors “the tail.”
sRef Jer@2 @36 S3′ sRef Jer@2 @37 S3′ sRef Jer@14 @3 S3′ sRef Jer@14 @4 S3′ sRef Isa@15 @2 S3′ [3] Again:
On all heads is baldness, every beard is shaved (Isa. 15:2);
“baldness on the heads” denotes no good and truth in the interiors; “the beard shaved,” no good and truth in the exteriors. In Jeremiah:
Thou shalt be ashamed of Egypt, as thou wast ashamed of Asshur. And thy hands shall be upon thy head; in that Jehovah hath abhorred thy defenses (Jer. 2:36, 37);
thus is described shame on account of the goods and truths of the church which have been destroyed through memory-knowledges and the reasonings from them. “Egypt” denotes memory-knowledge; “Asshur,” reasoning therefrom; “the hands upon the head” denotes to cover the interiors for shame. In like manner in another passage:
They were ashamed, and disgraced, and covered their head (Jer. 14:3; see also 2 Sam. 13:19).

AC (Potts) n. 9657 sRef Ex@26 @24 S0′ 9657. Unto one ring. That this signifies thus endurance, is evident from the signification of a “ring,” as being conjunction (see n. 9493, 9495), here endurance through conjunction, because it is said that “the planks shall be twinned unto one ring.”

AC (Potts) n. 9658 sRef Ex@26 @24 S0′ 9658. Thus shall it be for them both, they shall be at the two corners. That this signifies a like conjunction everywhere, is evident from the signification of “both,” or “two,” as being conjunction (see above, n. 9655). As this is on both sides, it signifies a like conjunction everywhere, for the planks twinned at the two corners looked to every quarter. So they constructed the two legs at the two corners; and looking to every quarter denotes everywhere. And as it was the same on both sides, there is signified the like conjunction everywhere.

AC (Potts) n. 9659 sRef Ex@26 @25 S0′ 9659. And there shall be eight planks, and their bases of silver. That this signifies support in every way by good, and through the truth which is from good, is evident from the signification of “eight,” as being in every way, of which in what follows; from the signification of “planks,” as being the good which supports (see n. 9634); and from the signification of “bases of silver,” as being support through the truth which is from good (n. 9643).
[2] That “eight” denotes in every way is because by this number is signified the same as by “two,” and by “four,” for it arises from these multiplied together, and by “two” and “four” is signified conjunction to the full (n. 5194, 8423, 8877), and from this also what is full (see n. 9103), and consequently in every way; for that which is in fullness is also in every way. By “eight” is also signified what is full and in every way, from the fact that by a “week” is signified an entire period from beginning to end (n. 2044, 3845); consequently by “the eighth day” is signified a full state, from which there is afterward made a new beginning. From this it was that male children were circumcised when eight days old (Gen. 17:12; 21:4); for by “circumcision” was signified purification from filthy loves by means of the truth of faith (n. 2039, 2046, 2799, 3412, 3413, 4462); the foreskin corresponded to the defilement of good by these loves (n. 4462, 7045, 7225); and “the sword of stone,” with which the circumcision was performed, signified the truth of faith by means of which purification is effected (n. 2039e, 2046e, 2799, 7044).
sRef Micah@5 @5 S3′ sRef Micah@5 @6 S3′ [3] What is full and in every way is also signified by “eight” after “seven,” in Micah:
When Asshur shall come into our land, and shall tread our palaces, then shall we set over him seven shepherds and eight princes of men. And they shall feed on the land of Asshur with the sword; and He shall deliver us from Asshur (Micah 5:5, 6);
“Asshur” denotes reasoning about the goods and truths of the church from man’s own intelligence; total or complete deliverance from the falsity thence, is signified by the “eight princes of men who shall destroy;” the “princes of men” denote the primary truths of good.
[4] That “eight” denotes what is full, and in every way, is also plain from experience concerning the admission and reception of societies into heaven (as may be seen above, n. 2130). The societies that were first received appeared up to twelve in number, and afterward eight; for those who are admitted and received into heaven are those who have been purified from earthly things, and therefore from the loves of them, and who have afterward been instructed; by the number “eight” was then signified what is full.
[5] The like is signified by “eight” in other parts of the Word, as by the porch of the gate from the house being “eight ells,” and by there being “eight steps” to the house, in Ezekiel 40:9, 31, 41. A new house is there treated of, by which is signified a New Church of the Lord; the truths which lead to good, and from good to truths, are signified by the porch and by the steps.
sRef Rev@21 @17 S6′ sRef Rev@13 @18 S6′ [6] He who knows not that in the Word numbers infold realities, is bound to get the idea that where the tabernacle, the temple of Solomon, and afterward a new house, and a new temple, and a new earth, are described in Ezekiel, the measurements and numbers have no real meaning, and therefore no holiness, although in the Word not a syllable is void of meaning. Let him who has intelligence consider the measurements and numbers in Ezekiel, from chapter 40 to chapter 48, and the measurements and numbers given by John in the Revelation, chapter 21, where also it is said that “the angel measured the wall of the New Jerusalem a hundred forty and four cubits,” and that “this measure is that of a man, that is, of an angel” (verse 17); also in another passage: “He that hath intelligence, let him compute the number of the beast; for it is the number of a man, and his number is six hundred and sixty-six” (Rev. 13:18); besides those given in many other passages. (That all the numbers mentioned in the Word signify real things, see n. 482, 487, 575, 647, 648, 755, 813, 1963, 1988, 2075, 2252, 3252, 4264, 4495, 4670, 5265, 5291, 5335, 5708, 6175, 7973; and in the places where it has been shown what is signified by some numbers in particular.)

AC (Potts) n. 9660 sRef Ex@26 @25 S0′ 9660. Sixteen bases. That this signifies complete support, is evident from the signification of “sixteen,” as being wholly, for “sixteen” has a similar signification to “eight,” because multiplied numbers signify the like as do their factors (see n. 5291, 5335, 5708, 7973); that “eight” denotes what is full, and in every way, was shown just above (n. 9659); thus it also denotes wholly. And from the signification of “bases,” as being support (n. 9643).

AC (Potts) n. 9661 sRef Ex@26 @25 S0′ 9661. Two bases under one plank, and two bases under one plank. That this signifies through the conjunction of truth with good everywhere, is evident from the signification of “two,” as being conjunction (see n. 1686, 3519, 5194, 8423); from the signification of “bases,” as being the truth which supports (see n. 9645); and from the signification of a “plank,” as being the good which supports (n. 9634). That it is so in each and all things, consequently everywhere, is involved in the repetition, as several times above.

AC (Potts) n. 9662 sRef Ex@26 @26 S0′ 9662. And thou shalt make bars of shittim wood. That this signifies the power of truth from good, is evident from the signification of “bars,” as being the power which truth has from good (see n. 9496); and from the signification of “shittim wood,” as being the good of merit which belongs to the Lord alone (n. 9472, 9486). That this good is the only good which reigns in heaven, see n. 9486; consequently it is that from which truths have power.

AC (Potts) n. 9663 sRef Ex@26 @26 S0′ 9663. Five for the planks of the one side of the Habitation. That this signifies whereby it looks toward the interiors of heaven where truth is in light, is evident from the signification of “five,” as being all things of that part (n. 9604); from the signification of “planks,” as being the goods which support (n. 9634); and from the signification of “the side of the Habitation,” as being the quarter of heaven which is looked to; for the “Habitation” denotes heaven (n. 9594); and “the side” denotes the quarter which is looked to. That it signifies toward the interiors where truth is in light, thus toward the south, is because the same things are said three times, and the third or last time, it is said “at the two legs toward the sea;” and three sides are mentioned, the first to the south (verse 18), the second to the north (verse 20), and the third to the sea (verse 22). (That “to the south” denotes to the interiors where truth is in light, see n. 9642; and that “to the north” denotes toward the exteriors where truth is in obscurity, see n. 9648; and that “to the sea” denotes where good is in obscurity, n. 9653.)

AC (Potts) n. 9664 sRef Ex@26 @27 S0′ 9664. And five bars for the planks of the other side of the Habitation. That this signifies the power of truth from good whereby it looks toward the exteriors where truth is in obscurity, is evident from what has been unfolded just above (n. 9662, 9663).

AC (Potts) n. 9665 sRef Ex@26 @27 S0′ 9665. And five bars for the planks of the side of the Habitation at the two legs toward the sea. That this signifies the power of truth from good whereby it looks to this heaven, where there is conjunction with good which is in obscurity, is evident from what has been unfolded just above (n. 9653, 9662, 9663).

AC (Potts) n. 9666 sRef Ex@26 @28 S0′ 9666. And the middle bar in the middle of the planks shall pass through from extremity to extremity. That this signifies the primary power from which the powers are everywhere continued, is evident from the signification of a “bar,” or “stave,” as being power (see n. 9496); from the signification of “the middle,” as being what is inmost and primary (n. 1074, 2940, 2973, 5897, 6084, 6103); from the signification of “passing through from extremity to extremity,” when it is said of a bar, by which is signified power, as being the powers which are thence derived and everywhere continued.
[2] How the case is with these things cannot be known unless it is known how it is with interior and exterior things in the spiritual world. Those things which are best and purest, thus which are more perfect than the rest, are in the inmost; those which proceed thence toward the exteriors are less perfect according to the degree of removal from the inmost things; and finally those things which are in the extremes are the least perfect of all (n. 9648). Those things are said to be less perfect which can be more easily wrested from their form and beauty, thus from their order. It is the same with fruits, which contain in their inmost part seeds, on the outside of which is the pulp. The seeds are in a more perfect state than the pulp which is outside; as can be seen from the fact that when the pulp decays, the seeds nevertheless remain entire. The case is the same with the seeds; inmostly in them is the prolific germ, and this is in a more perfect state than those parts of the seed which are outside; for when the exterior parts are dissolved the prolific germ remains in its entirety, and produces a new tree or plant. The case is the same in heaven, where the inmost things, being nearer to the Lord, are in a more perfect state than the exterior ones. From this it is that the inmost heaven excels in wisdom and intelligence, and therefore in happiness, the heavens which are below. The case is the same in each heaven, the inmost therein being more perfect than the things round about. It is the same with a man who is in the good of love and the truths of faith. His internal is in a more perfect state than his external, for the internal man is in the heat and light of heaven, but the external is in the heat and light of the world. It is the same in every perfect form; its inmost is the best. It is the inmost which is meant by “the middle.”
sRef Ps@19 @6 S3′ sRef Jer@12 @12 S3′ [3] That by “passing through from extremity to extremity,” when said of the bar, is signified the power thence derived and everywhere continued, is because “from extremity to extremity,” signifies the first end and the last, thus from beginning to end, for the first end is the beginning. It is for this reason that by “the extremities” are signified all things and everywhere; as in Jeremiah:
The sword of Jehovah devoureth from the extremity of the land unto the extremity thereof (Jer. 12:12).
A “sword” denotes truth fighting against falsity and destroying it, and in the opposite sense falsity fighting against truth and destroying it (n. 2799, 4499, 6353, 7102, 8294); “devouring from the extremity of the land unto the extremity thereof” denotes all things of the church, because “the land” denotes the church (n. 9334). In David:
His going forth is from the extremity of the heavens, and His circuit unto the extremities thereof (Ps. 19:6);
where also “from the extremity of the heavens unto the extremities thereof” denotes all things and everywhere.
sRef Isa@49 @6 S4′ sRef Isa@45 @22 S4′ sRef Mark@13 @27 S4′ sRef Ps@65 @5 S4′ sRef Isa@62 @11 S4′ sRef Jer@25 @31 S4′ [4] And in Mark:
He shall send forth His angels, and they shall gather together His elect from the four winds, from the extremity of the earth even unto the extremity of heaven (Mark 13:27);
where “the extremity of the earth and the extremity of heaven” denote all the external and internal things of the church (that “the earth” denotes the external of the church, and “heaven” its internal, see n. 1733, 1850, 2117, 2118, 3355, 4535, where the signification of “the new earth and the new heaven” is unfolded). So with “extremities” in the plural, as in these passages:
Look unto Me, that ye be saved, all the extremities of the earth (Isa. 45:22).
O God of our salvation, the trust of all the extremities of the earth, and of them that are afar off upon the sea (Ps. 65:5).
And also in the singular number, when it is said “even unto the extremity,” as in these passages:
That My salvation may be even unto the extremity of the earth (Isa. 49:6).
Jehovah shall make it to be heard even unto the extremity of the earth, Say ye to the daughter of Zion, Behold thy salvation cometh (Isa. 62:11).
A tumult shall come even unto the extremity of the earth (Jer. 25:31).
In these passages “even unto the extremity” implies from extremity to extremity.
sRef Isa@42 @10 S5′ [5] But when by “extremity” is meant only what is extreme or ultimate, then by it is signified that which is ultimate of heaven or of the church; as in Isaiah:
Sing unto Jehovah a new song, His praise, the extremity of the earth, going down to the sea, and the fullness thereof; ye Isles, and the inhabitants thereof (Isa. 42:10);
where “the extremity of the earth going down to the sea” denotes the ultimate of the church where good and truth are in obscurity (that “the sea” has this signification, see n. 9653); “the isles” denote those who are more remote from truths, and consequently from worship (n. 1158).
sRef Ps@65 @5 S6′ sRef Isa@43 @6 S6′ [6] Again:
Bring My sons from far, and My daughters from the extremity of the earth (Isa. 43:6);
where “sons from far” denote those who are in obscurity as to truths; and “daughters from the extremity of the earth” denote those who are in obscurity as to goods; such as were the Gentiles. (That “sons” denote those who are in truths, and in the abstract sense, truths, see n. 264, 489, 491, 1147, 2623, 2803, 2813, 3373, 3704; also that “daughters” denote those who are in goods, and in the abstract sense, goods, n. 489-491, 2362, 3963, 8994.) From this it is also evident that “extremity” is predicated of good, and “from far” of truth (see also Ps. 65:5, and Isa. 13:5). But be it known that by “the extremity of heaven” is not meant any extremity of space, but of the state of good and truth; for in heaven there is no space, but only the appearance of it according to the states of good and truth.

AC (Potts) n. 9667 sRef Ex@26 @29 S0′ 9667. And thou shalt overlay the planks with gold, and make their rings of gold, houses for the bars; and thou shalt overlay the bars with gold. That this signifies a representative of the good from which and through which are all things, is evident from the signification of “overlaying with gold,” and of “making of gold,” as being a representative of good (see n. 9510); by “the planks” also is signified the good which supports (n. 9634); by “the rings,” the conjunction of good and truth (n. 9493, 9495); and by “the bars,” the power of truth from good (n. 9496). The reason why all things are from good and through good, is that all things in the universe bear relation to good and truth, and good is that from which is truth, thus from which is everything. Good has its origin from the Divine Itself. The Lord’s Divine love is the Divine good, for all good belongs to love. The Divine love itself, thus the Divine good, is the very being that is called “Jehovah,” and also “the Lord;” the coming-forth therefrom is truth. From this it can be seen that all things are from good.

AC (Potts) n. 9668 sRef Ex@26 @30 S0′ 9668. And thou shalt set up the Habitation according to the method which thou wast made to see in the mountain. That this signifies toward the quarters, according to the states of good and of the derivative truth in the heaven which is represented, is evident from the signification of “the Habitation,” as being a representative of heaven (see n. 9594); from the signification of “according to the method which thou wast made to see in the mountain,” as being toward the quarters, according to the states of good and of the derivative truth in heaven; for this is meant by “the method according to which the Habitation was to be set up.” (That “Mount Sinai,” where it was seen, denotes heaven, see n. 9420.) From the description it is evident that as regards its length the Habitation was placed from east to west, and that the entrance was toward the east, and the ark toward the west; consequently the sides were toward the south and the north. The eastern quarter of the Habitation represented the state of good in its rising; the western quarter the state of good in its going down; the southern quarter the state of truth in its light; and the northern quarter the state of truth in its shade.
sRef Ezek@43 @3 S2′ sRef Ezek@43 @2 S2′ sRef Ezek@43 @1 S2′ sRef Ezek@43 @6 S2′ sRef Ezek@44 @1 S2′ sRef Ezek@43 @5 S2′ sRef Ezek@43 @4 S2′ sRef Ezek@44 @2 S2′ [2] The entrance was toward the eastern quarter for the reason that the Lord enters into heaven through the good of love, as can also be seen in Ezekiel, where the “new temple” is treated of, and where are these words:
He led me to the gate that looketh toward the east, when behold the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east. And the glory of Jehovah entered into the house by the way of the gate whose face is toward the east, and the glory of Jehovah filled the house (Ezek. 43:1-6).
Jehovah said unto me, This gate that looketh toward the east shall be shut, it shall not be opened, and no man shall enter in by it; but Jehovah the God of Israel shall enter in by it (Ezek. 44:1, 2);
from which it is very evident that the Lord alone enters into heaven through the good of love, and that the good of love from the Lord fills heaven and makes it. “The east” signifies the Lord as to the good of love, for the reason that the Lord is the Sun of heaven (n. 3636, 3643, 7078, 7083, 7270). But in heaven the case is this. The east is where the Lord appears as the Sun, which is in front over against the right eye (n. 4321, 7078, 7171); toward the west from it, and thus in a straight line from the east to the west, are those who are in the good of love; but toward the south are those who are in the light of truth, and toward the north are those who are in the shade of truth. All who are in heaven look toward the Lord, for looking forward there is looking to Him. No one in heaven can look backward from Him, however he may turn himself (see n. 4321). But this is a secret which the natural man cannot comprehend. Such are the things represented by the method shown to Moses in the mountain, in accordance with which the Habitation was to be set up.

AC (Potts) n. 9669 sRef Ex@26 @33 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @32 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @31 S0′ 9669. Verses 31-33. And thou shalt make a veil of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen; with the work of a thinker* shall he make it, with cherubs. And thou shalt bestow it upon four pillars of shittim overlaid with gold, and their hooks of gold, upon four bases of silver. And thou shalt bestow the veil under the hooks, and shalt bring in thither from within the veil the ark of the Testimony; and the veil shall divide for you between the holy and the holy of holies. “And thou shalt make a veil,” signifies the intermediate which unites this heaven and the inmost heaven, thus spiritual good with celestial good; “of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen,” signifies the goods of love and of faith conjoined; “with the work of a thinker* shall he make it,” signifies the understanding; “with cherubs,” signifies a guard lest they should be commingled; “and thou shalt bestow it upon four pillars of shittim,” signifies the good of merit, which belongs to the Lord alone, conjoining and supporting; “overlaid with gold,” signifies the representative there; “and their hooks of gold,” signifies the methods of conjunction by means of good; “upon four bases of silver,” signifies the power of conjunction by means of truth; “and thou shalt bestow the veil under the hooks,” signifies the capability of conjunction and the consequent actuality; “and shalt bring in thither from within the veil the ark of the Testimony,” signifies the coming-forth of the inmost heaven within this uniting medium; “and the veil shall divide for you between the holy and the holy of holies,” signifies between spiritual good which is the good of charity toward the neighbor and the good of faith in the Lord, and celestial good which is the good of love to the Lord and the good of mutual love.
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9670 sRef Ex@26 @31 S0′ 9670. And thou shalt make a veil. That this signifies the intermediate which unites this heaven and the inmost heaven, thus spiritual good with celestial good, is evident from the signification of the “veil,” which made a division between the Habitation where was the ark of the Testimony, and the place where were the lampstand and the table on which were the breads of faces, as being the intermediate which unites the middle heaven and the inmost heaven; for by the ark in which was the Testimony was represented the inmost heaven, where the Lord is (see n. 9457, 9481, 9485), and by the Habitation outside the veil was represented the middle heaven (n. 9594). And as the good of love to the Lord makes the inmost heaven, and the good of charity toward the neighbor makes the middle heaven, therefore by the “veil” is also signified the intermediate which unites spiritual good and celestial good. Spiritual good is the good of charity toward the neighbor, and celestial good is the good of love to the Lord (that the heavens are distinguished according to these goods, may be seen from the citations given above n. 9277). From all this it is now evident what is signified by the “veil,” both in the tabernacle and in the temple.
[2] These two heavens, namely the inmost and the middle, are so distinct that there is no entrance from the one into the other. But still they constitute one heaven by means of intermediate angelic societies, which are of such a genius that they can accede to the good of both heavens. These societies are what constitute the uniting intermediate which was represented by the veil. It has also been sometimes granted me to speak with angels from these societies. The quality of the angels of the inmost heaven, and the relative quality of the angels of the middle heaven, can be seen from correspondence. To the angels of the inmost heaven correspond those things in man which belong to the province of the heart, and to that of the cerebellum; but to the angels of the middle heaven correspond those things in man which belong to the province of the lungs, and to that of the cerebrum. The things that belong to the heart and the cerebellum are called involuntary and spontaneous, because they so appear; but those which belong to the lungs and the cerebrum are called voluntary. From this can in some measure be seen the nature of the perfection of the one heaven over the other, and also the nature of the difference between them. But to the intermediate angels who accede to both heavens, and conjoin them, correspond the cardiac and pulmonary networks of blood vessels by means of which is effected the conjunction of the heart with the lungs; and also the medulla oblongata, in which the fiber of the cerebellum is conjoined with the fiber of the cerebrum.
[3] (That the angels who are of the Lord’s celestial kingdom, that is, who are in the inmost heaven, constitute the province of the heart in the Grand Man; and that the angels who are of the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, that is, who are in the middle heaven, constitute the province of the lungs, see n. 3635, 3886-3890; also that from this comes the correspondence of the heart and of the lungs in man, n. 3883-3896.) It is the same with the correspondence of the cerebrum and the cerebellum. The quality of the celestial, or of those who are in the inmost heaven, and the quality of the spiritual, or of those who are in the middle heaven; and the difference between them, may be seen above (n. 2046, 2227, 2669, 2708, 2715, 2718, 2935, 2937, 2954, 3166, 3235-3236, 3240, 3246, 3374, 3833, 3887, 3969, 4138, 4286, 4493, 4585, 4938, 5113, 5150, 5922, 6289, 6296, 6366, 6427, 6435, 6500, 6647, 6648, 7091, 7233, 7877, 7977, 7992, 8042, 8152, 8234, 8521). From this it can be seen what is the quality of the intermediate angels who constitute the uniting intermediate which was represented by the veil.
[4] That the veil of the temple was rent in twain when the Lord suffered the cross (Matt. 27:51; Mark 15:38; Luke 23:45) signified His glorification; for when the Lord was in the world, He made His Human Divine truth; but when He departed out of the world, He made His Human Divine good, from which the Divine truth now proceeds (see the citations in n. 9199, 9315). Divine good is the holy of holies.
[5] The glorification of the Lord’s Human even to the Divine good which is “Jehovah,” is also described in the internal sense by the process of expiation, when Aaron entered into the holy of holies within the veil (Lev. 16); and in the relative sense by the same process is described the regeneration of man even to celestial good, which is the good of the inmost heaven. The process referred to was as follows. Aaron was to take a bullock for a sacrifice, and a ram for a burnt-offering, for himself and his house; and he was to put on the garments of holiness, which were a tunic of linen, breeches of linen, a belt of linen, and a miter of linen, and to wash his flesh in water. And he was to take two he-goats, and cast lots upon them; and one of these was to be offered to Jehovah, and the other to be sent forth into the wilderness; the latter for the assembly of the sons of Israel. When he sacrificed the bullock he was to bring incense within the veil and to sprinkle of the blood of the bullock and of the he-goat seven times upon the propitiatory [mercy seat] eastward, and also to put blood upon the horns of the altar.
Afterward he was to confess the sins of the sons of Israel, which he was to put upon the he-goat, and this was to be sent forth into the wilderness. Lastly he was to put off the garments of linen, and to put on his own, and to make a burnt-offering for himself and for the people. The sacrifices that were not to be offered are stated. This was to be done every year, when Aaron entered into the holy of holies within the veil. The priesthood which Aaron administered represented the Lord as to Divine good, even as the regal office which was afterward vested in the kings represented the Lord as to Divine truth (n. 6148). The process of the glorification of the Lord’s Human even to Divine good is here described in the internal sense. This process was exhibited to the angels when Aaron performed these things and entered within the veil, and it is also now exhibited to them when this portion of the Word is read.
[6] By “the bullock for the sin-offering,” and by “the ram for a burnt- offering,” is signified the purification of good from evils in the external and in the internal man; by “the tunic of linen, the breeches of linen, the belt of linen, and the miter of linen,” which he was to put on when he entered in, and by “the washing of his flesh,” is signified that the purification was effected by means of truths from good; by “the two he-goats of the goats for a sin-offering,” and by “the ram for a burnt-offering,” and by “the he-goat which was offered,” and by the other one that was “sent forth,” is signified the purification of truth from falsities in the external man; by “the incense which he was to bring within the veil,” is signified adaptation; by “the blood of the bullock; and the blood of the he-goat which was to be sprinkled seven times upon the propitiatory [mercy seat] eastward and afterward upon the horns of the altar,” is signified Divine truth from Divine good; by “the confession of sins over the living goat, which was to be sent forth into the wilderness,” is signified a complete separation and casting out of evil from good; by his “putting off the garments of linen, and putting on his own garments,” when he was to offer the burnt-offerings, also by “the bringing forth of the flesh, the skin, and the dung of the sacrifices outside the camp and burning them,” is signified the putting on of celestial good with a regenerate person, and the glorification in the Lord of the Human even to Divine good, after all those things had been rejected which were of the human derived from the mother, even until He was no longer her son (see the citations in n. 9315). These are the things which are signified by this process of purification, when Aaron entered into the holy of holies within the veil; for after these things had been performed, Aaron represented the Lord as to Divine good. From all this it can be seen that by “the veil between the holy and the holy of holies” is also signified the intermediate uniting the Divine truth and the Divine good in the Lord.

AC (Potts) n. 9671 sRef Ex@26 @31 S0′ 9671. Of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen. That this signifies the goods of love and of faith conjoined there, is evident from the signification of “blue” [hyacinthinum] as being the celestial love of truth (see n. 9466); from the signification of “crimson,” as being the celestial love of good (n. 9467); from the signification of “scarlet double-dyed,” as being spiritual good (n. 4922, 9468); and from the signification of “fine twined linen,” as being truth from a celestial origin (n. 9469). From this it is plain that by these four are signified the goods of love and of faith conjoined in the uniting medium. The case herein is this. Those in heaven who bear relation to the uniting medium represented by the veil, have the goods of love and the goods of faith conjoined together in themselves; for through the goods of love they are conjoined with the celestial who are in the inmost heaven, and through the goods of faith with the spiritual who are in the middle heaven; for the good of love to the Lord is called “celestial good;” and the good of faith in Him is called “spiritual good.”
[2] Those in heaven who bear relation to the uniting medium are called “celestial spiritual” and “spiritual celestial;” the former are represented in the Word by Joseph, and the latter by Benjamin. (That in the representative sense “Joseph” denotes the celestial spiritual, see n. 4286, 4592, 4963, 5249, 5307, 5331, 5332, 5417, 5869, 5877, 6224, 6526; and that “Benjamin” denotes the spiritual celestial, n. 3969, 4592; and thus that “Joseph” denotes the internal uniting medium, and “Benjamin” the external uniting medium, n. 4585, 4592, 4594, 5411, 5413, 5443, 5639, 5686, 5688, 5689, 5822. What the celestial spiritual is, and what the spiritual celestial, see n. 1577, 1824, 2184, 4585, 4592, 4594.)
[3] From the opposites also, which are in the hells, it is known of what nature is the distinction between the celestial and the spiritual in the heavens. Those in the hells who are opposite to the celestial are called “genii;” and those in the hells who are opposite to the spiritual are called “spirits.” The genii, who are opposite to the celestial, are at the back; but the spirits, who are opposite to the spiritual, are in front; and the intermediate ones are at the sides. The genii, being opposite to the celestial, are in more interior evil than the spirits. (Concerning both of these from experience, see n. 5977, 8593, 8622, 8625.) The hell of the genii is quite separate from that of the spirits, insomuch that they who are in the one cannot pass into the other; for there are intermediate ones there who conjoin them, who are opposite to the intermediate ones in the heavens.

AC (Potts) n. 9672 sRef Ex@26 @31 S0′ 9672. With the work of a thinker* shall he make it, signifies the understanding (as above, n. 9598).
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9673 sRef Ex@26 @31 S0′ 9673. With cherubs. That this signifies a guard lest spiritual good and celestial good, and thus the middle heaven and the inmost heaven, should be commingled, is evident from the signification of the “cherubs,” as being guard and providence lest the Lord be approached except through good, and lest the good which is from the Lord in heaven and with man be injured (see n. 9509). That it also denotes lest spiritual good and celestial good, thus those two heavens, should be commingled, is because, if they were commingled, both goods would be injured, insomuch that the heavens themselves would perish. This can be seen from the difference between the two goods, thus between the two heavens, as shown in the places above cited (n. 9670). For this reason there are intermediate angelic societies which are in celestial spiritual good, and in spiritual celestial good, through which the conjunction is effected (n. 9671). Neither are these goods conjoined in these angelic societies; but they are distinct from one another. From all this it is evident that these societies are guards lest the two goods should be commingled; and therefore also that by the “cherubs” is signified this guard and providence of the Lord.

AC (Potts) n. 9674 sRef Ex@26 @32 S0′ sRef Job@9 @6 S0′ 9674. And thou shalt bestow it upon four pillars of shittim. That this signifies the good of merit, which belongs to the Lord alone, conjoining and supporting, is evident from the signification of “four,” as being conjunction (see n. 1686, 8877); that “four” denotes conjunction is because this number arises from two multiplied into itself, and multiplied numbers have the same signification as the simple numbers of which they are composed (n. 5291, 5335, 5708, 7973, and that “two” denotes conjunction, see n. 5194, 8423); from the signification of “pillars,” as being support (of which in what follows); and from the signification of “shittim wood,” as being the good of merit, which belongs to the Lord alone (n. 9472, 9486). That this good is the only good which reigns in heaven, may be seen above (n. 9486); thus it is also that which supports heaven. The reason why “pillars” signify support, is that they supported the veil, just as the planks, also of shittim wood, supported the curtains of the Habitation (n. 9634).
sRef Ps@75 @2 S2′ sRef Ps@75 @3 S2′ sRef Rev@3 @12 S2′ [2] By “pillars” in the spiritual sense are signified those things which support heaven and the church, and which are the goods of love and the goods of faith from the Lord. These are signified by “pillars” in these passages:
I will judge in rectitudes, the earths are melting and all its inhabitants, I will make firm its pillars (Ps. 75:2, 3).
God, who shaketh the earth out of her place, so that the pillars thereof tremble (Job 9:6).
“The pillars of the earth” denote the goods and truths which support the church; for “the earth” in the Word denotes the church (n. 9325). It is evident that the pillars of the earth are not the things which tremble. And in John:
He that overcometh, I will make him a pillar in the temple of My God, and he shall go outside no more; and I will write upon him the name of My God, and the name of the city of My God, the New Jerusalem, which cometh down out of heaven from My God, and My new name (Rev. 3:12);
where a “pillar in the temple” denotes the goods and truths of the church, which are also meant by “the name of God,” and “the name of the city, the New Jerusalem.” (That “the name of God” denotes all the good and truth of the church, or everything in the complex by which the Lord is worshiped, see n. 2724, 3006, 6674, 9310.)

AC (Potts) n. 9675 sRef Ex@26 @32 S0′ 9675. Overlaid with gold. That this signifies a representative there of good, namely, of the good which is signified by “the pillars of shittim wood,” is evident from the signification of “overlaying with gold,” and of “making of gold,” as being a representative of good (see n. 9510).

AC (Potts) n. 9676 sRef Ex@26 @32 S0′ 9676. Their hooks of gold. That this signifies the methods of conjunction by means of good, is evident from the signification of “hooks,” as being methods of conjunction – “hooks” have this signification from their form; and from the signification of “gold,” as being good (see n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 9490).

AC (Potts) n. 9677 sRef Ex@26 @32 S0′ 9677. Upon four bases of silver. That this signifies the power of conjunction by means of truth, is evident from the signification of “four,” as being conjunction (of which just above, n. 9674); from the signification of “bases,” as being power (see n. 9643); and from the signification of “silver,” as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658, 6112, 6914, 6917, 7999).

AC (Potts) n. 9678 sRef Ex@26 @33 S0′ 9678. And thou shalt bestow the veil under the hooks. That this signifies the capability of conjunction, and the consequent actuality, is evident from the signification of “the hooks,” as being capability of conjunction (see n. 9611); the consequent actuality is signified by “bestowing the veil under” them.

AC (Potts) n. 9679 sRef Ex@26 @33 S0′ 9679. And shalt bring in thither from within the veil the ark of the Testimony. That this signifies the coming-forth [existentia] of the inmost heaven within this uniting medium, is evident from the signification of “the veil,” as being the medium which unites the two heavens (see n. 9670, 9671); and from the signification of “the ark of the Testimony,” as being the inmost heaven (n. 9485) the coming-forth of this heaven is signified by “bringing in thither the ark.”

AC (Potts) n. 9680 sRef Ex@26 @33 S0′ 9680. And the veil shall divide for you between the holy and the holy of holies. That this signifies between spiritual good which is the good of charity toward the neighbor and the good of faith in the Lord, and celestial good which is the good of love to the Lord and the good of mutual love, is evident from the signification of “the holy,” as being the good that reigns in the middle heaven; and from the signification of “the holy of holies,” as being the good that reigns in the inmost heaven. That this good is the good of love to the Lord and the good of mutual love; and that the former, namely, the good that reigns in the middle heaven, is the good of charity toward the neighbor and the good of faith in the Lord, is evident from all that has been shown concerning each kind of good, celestial and spiritual, in the passages cited above (see n. 9670). The good of love to the Lord in the inmost heaven is the internal good there, and the good of mutual love is the external good there. And the good of charity toward the neighbor is the internal good in the middle heaven, and the good of faith in the Lord is the external good there. In each heaven there is an internal and an external, just as there is in the church, which is both internal and external (as may be seen above, n. 409, 1083, 1098, 1238, 1242, 4899, 6380, 6587, 7840, 8762, 9375).
[2] All good is holy, and all truth is holy insofar as it has good in it. Good is called “holy” from the Lord, because the Lord alone is holy, and because from Him is all good and all truth (n. 9229, 9479). From this it is evident why the Habitation is called “the holy; and why the ark in which was the Testimony is called “the holy of holies;” for the Testimony denotes the Lord Himself as to Divine truth (n. 9503); and “the ark” denotes the inmost heaven where the Lord is (n. 9485). The Lord is also in the middle heaven; but He is more fully present in the inmost heaven; for they who are conjoined with the Lord by the good of love are with Him; but they who are conjoined with the Lord by the good of faith are indeed with Him, but more remotely. In the middle heaven there is conjunction with the Lord through faith implanted in the good of charity toward the neighbor. From all this it is evident why the Habitation that was outside the veil is called “the holy;” and why the Habitation that was within the veil is called “the holy of holies.”
sRef Rev@15 @4 S3′ sRef Dan@9 @24 S3′ [3] That it is the Lord from whom is all the holy, and that He is the very holy of holies, is evident in these passages:
Seventy weeks have been decreed upon My people, to anoint the holy of holies (Dan. 9:24).
Who shall not fear Thee, O Lord, and glorify Thy name? For Thou only art holy (Rev. 15:4).
Therefore also the Lord is called “the Holy One of Israel” (Isa. 1:4; 5:19, 24; 10:20; 12:6; 17:7; 29:19; 30:11, 12, 15; 31:1; 37:23; 41:14, 16, 20; 43:3, 14; 45:11; 60:9, 14; Jer. 50:29; 51:5; Ezek. 39:7; Ps. 71:22; 78:41; 89:18; 2 Kings 19:22; and elsewhere). Therefore among the sons of Israel whatever represented the Lord, or the good and truth which proceed from Him, after inauguration was called “holy,” for the reason that the Lord alone is holy. The “Holy Spirit” in the Word is also the holy which proceeds from the Lord.

AC (Potts) n. 9681 sRef Ex@26 @34 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @36 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @37 S0′ sRef Ex@26 @35 S0′ 9681. Verses 34-37. And thou shalt bestow the propitiatory [mercy seat] upon the ark of the Testimony in the holy of holies. And thou shalt put the table outside the veil, and the lampstand over against the table upon the side of the Habitation toward the south; and thou shalt bestow the table at the side of the north. And thou shalt make a covering for the door of the Tent, of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen, the work of the embroiderer. And thou shalt make for the covering five pillars of shittim, and overlay them with gold; and their hooks shall be of gold; and thou shalt cast for them five bases of brass. “And thou shalt bestow the propitiatory [mercy seat] upon the ark of the Testimony in the holy of holies,” signifies the hearing and reception of all things in the inmost heaven which are of worship from the good of love from the Lord; “and thou shalt put the table outside the veil,” signifies influx through the celestial things that belong to love; “and the lampstand over against the table on the side of the Habitation toward the south,” signifies the illumination of the spiritual kingdom through the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine Human to those who are in good; “and thou shalt bestow the table at the side of the north,” signifies good in obscurity; “and thou shalt make a covering for the door of the Tent,” signifies the intermediate that unites the second or middle heaven with the first or ultimate one; “of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen,” signifies from the good of charity and of faith; “the work of the embroiderer,” signifies things of memory-knowledge; “and thou shalt make for the covering five pillars of shittim,” signifies the support of the uniting intermediate, as far as is sufficient, through the good of merit which belongs to the Lord’s Divine Human; “and overlay them with gold,” signifies a representative of good; “and their hooks shall be of gold,” signifies the methods of conjunction through good; “and thou shalt cast for them five bases of brass,” signifies power from external good.

AC (Potts) n. 9682 sRef Ex@26 @34 S0′ 9682. And thou shalt bestow the propitiatory [mercy seat] upon the ark of the Testimony in the holy of holies. That this signifies the hearing and reception of all things in the inmost heaven which are of worship from the good of love from the Lord, is evident from the signification of “the propitiatory [mercy seat]” as being the hearing and reception of all things of worship from the good of love (see n. 9506); from the signification of “the ark of the Testimony,” as being the inmost heaven where the Lord is (n. 9485; that “the Testimony” in the ark denotes the Lord, see n. 9503); and from the signification of “the holy of holies,” as being where the good of love from the Lord is (n. 9680). From this it is plain that by the words “and thou shalt bestow the propitiatory [mercy seat] upon the ark of the testimony in the holy of holies” is signified the hearing and reception of all things in the inmost heaven which are of worship from the good of love from the Lord.
[2] How the case is with the presence of the Lord in the inmost heaven, and with His presence in the middle heaven, and also in the ultimate heaven, can be seen from what has been shown in many places about the influx of good and truth from the Lord. The presence of the Lord is effected by means of influx, and the influx is according to the life of good and of truth. Those who are in the good of love to the Lord are those who receive the influx most immediately; those who are in the good of charity toward the neighbor also receive it, but more remotely, because the good of charity toward the neighbor is more remote than the good itself of love to the Lord; while those who are in the good of faith also do indeed receive the influx, but only in proportion to the good which the faith has in it; and therefore those who receive it are in the good of life from the truths of faith; for the Lord is in good, because all good is from Him, and absolutely none from man, nor from the angels in heaven.
[3] As to what further concerns the presence of the Lord in heaven, and through heaven with man, be it known that the Lord is above the heavens, for He is the very Sun of heaven, but nevertheless He is present by means of the light and heat from the Sun. The light therefrom is the Divine truth which is of faith, and the heat therefrom is the Divine good which is of love. That which proceeds from the Lord is Himself. From all this it is evident that the Lord is present where the good which is from Him is received. But all these things can be better comprehended from what has been shown concerning influx; namely, that everything of life flows in from the Lord, thus all good and truth, because these make the life of man, and that which flows in, is according to the reception with everyone (n. 2535, 2706, 2886-2889, 2893, 3001, 3318, 3484, 3742, 3743, 4151, 5846, 5850, 5986, 6053-6058, 6189-6215, 6307-6327, 6466-6495, 6598-6626, 6982, 6985, 6996, 7004, 7055, 7056, 7058, 7147, 7270, 7343, 8321, 8685, 8701, 8717, 8728, 9110, 9111, 9216); and that influx from the Lord is immediate, and also mediate through the heavens (n. 5147, 6058, 6063, 6466, 6472, 6473, 6982, 6985, 6996, 7004, 7007, 7055, 7056, 7058, 7270, 8685, 8701, 8717, 8728, 9216).

AC (Potts) n. 9683 sRef Ex@26 @35 S0′ 9683. And thou shalt put the table outside the veil. That this signifies influx through the celestial things that belong to love, is evident from the signification of “the table on which were the breads of faces,” as being the receptacle of celestial things (n. 9527, 9545); and from the signification of “outside the veil,” as being outside the uniting intermediate through which there is mediate influx; for by “the veil” is signified the uniting intermediate (n. 9670), and because that table was behind the veil, therefore there was signified influx through the celestial things of the inmost heaven, which are the goods of love. That there is mediate influx from the Lord through the inmost heaven, and immediate influx from Himself, can be seen from the places above cited (n. 9682e). With every good which makes heavenly life, thus eternal life, with man and with angel, the case is this. The inmost of good is the Lord Himself, consequently is the good of love which is immediately from Him; the good which next succeeds is the good of mutual love; then the good of charity toward the neighbor; finally the good of faith. This is the successive order of goods from the inmost. From this it can be seen how the case is with immediate and mediate influx. In general it may be said that insofar as a good succeeding in order (that is, a more external good), has in it a more interior good, so far it is good, for insofar it is nearer to the Lord Himself, who, as before said, is the inmost good. But the successive arrangement and setting in order of interior goods in exterior, varies in each and all subjects according to the reception, and the reception is according to the spiritual and moral life in the world of everyone, for the life in the world remains with everyone to eternity.
[2] The influx of the Lord is also immediate with everyone, for without immediate influx the mediate effects nothing. Immediate influx is received according to the order in which the man or angel is, thus according to the Divine truth which is from the Divine, because this is order (n. 1728, 1919, 2447, 4839, 5703, 7995, 8512, 8513, 8700, 8988); and so it is order itself with man that he should live in the good which is from the Lord, that is, that he should live from the Lord. This influx is continual, and is adjoined to each and all things of the will of man, directing them as much as possible into order, for man’s own will is continually leading him away from order. It is the same with the voluntary and involuntary things in man. His voluntary things continually lead away from order, but the involuntary ones continually bring back to order. It is for this reason that the motion of the heart, which is involuntary, is completely removed from man’s will, and in like manner the action of the cerebellum; and that the motions of the heart, and the powers of the cerebellum, direct the voluntary things, to prevent them from rushing beyond bounds and extinguishing the life of the body before its time; and therefore the primal activities of both the involuntary and the voluntary things in the whole body go on conjointly. These things have been said in order in some measure to illustrate the idea about the immediate and the mediate influx of the celestial things of love and the spiritual things of faith from the Lord.

AC (Potts) n. 9684 sRef Ex@26 @35 S0′ 9684. And the lampstand over against the table on the side of the Habitation toward the south. That this signifies the illumination of the spiritual kingdom by means of the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine human to those who are in good is evident from the signification of “the lampstand” as being the Lord as to Divine truth, thus the Divine truth that proceeds from His Divine Human, and the consequent illumination of His spiritual kingdom (of which in what follows); from the signification of “the table upon which were the breads of faces,” over against which was the lampstand, as being the Lord as to celestial good, and thus this good itself, from which and through which the Lord flows into the spiritual kingdom, that is, into the middle heaven (of which also in what follows); and from the signification of “on the side of the Habitation toward the south,” as being in heaven where the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine Human is in the greatest light; for the Habitation outside the veil, where the lampstand was, denotes the middle heaven (n. 9594), and “the south” or “midday” denotes where Divine truth is in its light (see n. 9642). That the lampstand was in the Habitation near the veil, and also the table upon which were the breads of faces; and that the lampstand was on the side toward the south, and the table on the side toward the north; are arcana of heaven which cannot be made plain unless it is known that the Habitation represented heaven, and the things in the Habitation the celestial and spiritual things which are in heaven. (What “the lampstand” represented has been shown above, n. 9548; and what “the table upon which were the breads of faces,” n. 9527, 9545; and what “the south” or “midday,” n. 9642; and what “the north,” n. 3708.) From this it can be seen that by “the lampstand on the side of the Habitation toward the south” is signified the illumination of the spiritual kingdom by means of the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine Human.
sRef Rev@1 @12 S2′ sRef Rev@1 @14 S2′ sRef Rev@1 @13 S2′ [2] But in order that the arcana themselves may be clearly seen, it must be stated how the case is in the heavens. The Lord appears to those who are of the celestial kingdom as a Sun, but to those who are of the spiritual kingdom as a Moon. The Lord as a Sun appears at a middle altitude over against the right eye; and as a Moon also at a middle altitude over against the left eye. From the Lord as a Sun, light comes to those who are in His celestial kingdom; and from the Lord as a Moon, light comes to those who are in His spiritual kingdom (concerning these two kingdoms, see the places cited in n. 9277). The light in the heavens is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine Human, and this, when received by the angels of the spiritual kingdom, is called the truth of faith from the good of charity toward the neighbor. The middle heaven, which is called the spiritual heaven, consists of this good and this truth. The lampstand in the Habitation represented the Moon, from which those who are of the spiritual kingdom have light, thus it represented the Lord as to Divine truth there; for, as before said, the Lord appears as a Moon to those who belong to this kingdom. From all this it can now be seen why the lampstand was placed toward the south, for “the south” or “midday” denotes where Divine truth is in light (see n. 9642); and why the table upon which were the breads of faces was placed toward the north, for “the north” denotes where Divine truth is in obscurity (n. 3708). The case is the same with the Divine good signified by “the breads” upon this table; this good becomes spiritual good through the reception of Divine truth as of light from the Moon. These are the arcana which are signified by the lampstand and its position toward the south; and by the table upon which were the breads of faces, and its position toward the north.
sRef Rev@21 @23 S3′ [3] That “the lampstand” denotes the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine Human, is evident from Revelation:
I saw seven golden lampstands, and in the midst of the seven lampstands one like unto the Son of man, clothed with a garment down to the feet, and girt about the breasts with a golden girdle (Rev. 1:12, 13);
“the Son of man” denotes the Lord in respect to the Divine truth from His Divine Human (n. 2803, 2813, 3704). And in another passage in the same book:
The glory of God shall lighten the Holy City Jerusalem, and the Lamb is the lamp thereof (Rev. 21:23);
“the glory of God” denotes the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord (n. 9429); “the lamp which is the Lamb,” that is, the Lord, denotes faith, and the consequent intelligence of truth and wisdom of good, which are from the Lord alone (n. 9548); “the New Jerusalem” denotes the Lord’s New Church (see n. 2117).
[4] (That the Lord is a Sun to those who are in the celestial kingdom, and appears as a Moon to those who are in the spiritual kingdom, see n. 1053, 1521, 1529-1531, 3636, 3643, 5097, 7083, 7173, 7270, 8644, 8812; consequently that by “the sun” in the Word is signified the Lord as to celestial good, and by “the moon” the Lord as to spiritual good, n. 1529, 1530, 2441, 2495, 4060, 4696, 7083, 8644; and that the Lord as a Sun appears at a middle altitude over against the right eye, and as a Moon also at a middle altitude over against the left eye, n. 1531, 4321, 7078, 7171. It is for this reason that the east in heaven is where the Lord appears as a Sun, and the south where the Lord appears as a Moon. (That the light from the Lord as a Sun and as a Man is the Divine truth that proceeds from His Divine Human, see n. 1053, 1521-1533, 1619-1632, 2776, 3094, 3138, 3167, 3190, 3195, 3222, 3223, 3337, 3339, 3341, 3636, 3643, 3862, 3993, 4060, 4180, 4302, 4408, 4414, 4415, 4419, 4527, 4598, 5400, 6032, 6313, 6315, 6608, 6907, 7174, 8644, 8707, 8861, 9399, 9407.) And as the light from the Lord as a Sun and as a Moon is the Divine truth that proceeds from Him, therefore the heat from the Lord as a Sun in heaven is the Divine good of His Divine love (n. 3338, 3339, 3636, 3643, 5215, 6032).
[5] From this can be seen the nature of the difference between the celestial kingdom and the spiritual kingdom of the Lord in respect to the reception of Divine truth, namely, that it is like the difference between the light from the sun and the light from the moon. (That on this account they who are in the spiritual kingdom are comparatively in obscurity in respect to the truth of faith and the good of love, see n. 2708, 2715, 2718, 2831, 2849, 2935, 2937, 3241, 3833, 6289, 6500, 6945, 7233; that these especially were saved by the coming of the Lord into the world, n. 2661, 2716, 3969, 6373, 6854, 6914, 7035, 7091, 7828, 7932a, 8018, 8054, 8159, 8321, 9596; and that they have illumination in the Lord’s Divine Human, n. 2716, 2833, 2834; but that those belonging to the spiritual church are saved who are in the good of life through the truths of faith, n. 2954, 6435, 6647, 6648, 7977, 7992, 8643, 8648, 8658, 8685, 8690, 8701.)

AC (Potts) n. 9685 sRef Ex@26 @35 S0′ 9685. And thou shalt bestow the table at the side of the north. That this signifies good in obscurity, is evident from the signification of “the table upon which were the breads of faces,” as being a receptacle of celestial things (see n. 9527), for “the breads” denote celestial good which is from the Lord (n. 9545); and from the signification of “the north,” as being obscurity in respect to the truths of faith (n. 3708) and when truth is in obscurity, good also is in obscurity; because in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom good appears through truth, and truth is perceived as good when it comes from the understanding into the will. This good is the good of charity toward the neighbor, and is called “spiritual good.” It is otherwise in the Lord’s celestial kingdom; there good does not appear as good through truth, but is perceived from good itself. From this it can be seen why the table was placed on the side toward the north, and the lampstand on the side toward the south. But see what has been said and shown on this subject just above (n.9684).

AC (Potts) n. 9686 sRef Ex@26 @36 S0′ 9686. And thou shalt make a covering for the door of the Tent. That this signifies the intermediate that unites the second or middle heaven with the first or ultimate heaven, is evident from the signification of the “covering,” as being the intermediate that unites this heaven, which is represented by the Tent of meeting, with the heaven represented by the court, which is treated of in the following chapter. For as “the veil” between the holy and the holy of holies signified the uniting intermediate between the inmost or third heaven and the middle or second heaven, so this “covering” signifies the like between the middle or second heaven and the first or ultimate heaven. That there are three heavens, and that two of them were represented by the Habitation that was inside the veil and the Habitation that was outside the veil, has been shown above; and that the first or ultimate heaven is represented by the court, will of the Lord’s Divine mercy be shown in the following chapter. The entrance from the one heaven into the other is signified by “the door” where the covering was. That a “door” signifies entrance, see n. 2145, 2152, 2356, 2385; and hence communication (n. 8989); wherefore “the covering” at the entrance, which was in the place of a door, denotes the intermediate that communicates and unites.

AC (Potts) n. 9687 sRef Ex@26 @36 S0′ 9687. Of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen. That this signifies from the good of charity and of faith, is evident from the signification of “blue, crimson, scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen,” where the veil is treated of, by which is signified the uniting intermediate between the inmost and the middle heavens, as being the goods of love and of faith (see n. 9671); but here the goods of charity and of faith, because the covering is treated of, by which is signified the uniting intermediate between the second and the ultimate heavens (n. 9686). For in the inmost heaven there reigns the good of love to the Lord, but in the middle heaven the good of charity toward the neighbor, and in the ultimate heaven the good of faith. From this it is that by “blue, crimson, scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen” are signified the goods which reign in these last-mentioned heavens.

AC (Potts) n. 9688 sRef Ex@26 @36 S0′ 9688. The work of the embroiderer. That this signifies matters of memory-knowledge, is evident from the signification of “the work of the embroiderer,” or of “embroidery,” as being memory-knowledge. In many passages in the Word mention is made of “what is embroidered,” and of “embroidery,” and everywhere is thereby signified memory-knowledge. This originates in the representatives in the other life, where embroidered garments of various kinds appear, by which are signified memory-truths.
[2] Such truths differ from intellectual truths as external things differ from internal, or as in man the natural differs from the spiritual; for memory-knowledges serve the understanding as objects from which it may hatch out truths. For the understanding is the organ of sight of the internal man, and memory-knowledges are the objects of the same in the external or natural man. These latter are signified by “the work of the embroiderer,” but the former by “the work of the thinker,”* for thinking belongs to the understanding, and “embroidering” denotes the work of one who knows and executes from the understanding. It is for this reason that those things in the Habitation which signified internal things were “from the work of the thinker,”* as for instance the curtains themselves therein (verse 1), and the veil between the holy and the holy of holies (verse 31); but those which signified what is external were “from the work of the embroiderer,” as for instance the covering for the door of the Tent, and for the gate of the court (Exod. 38:18), and also the belt (Exod. 39:29); for “the belt” denotes the external thing which conjoins all the internal things. “The court” denotes the ultimate of heaven, and “the door of the Tent” denotes where there is an exit from the middle heaven into the ultimate one.
sRef Ezek@27 @24 S3′ sRef Ezek@27 @20 S3′ sRef Ezek@27 @7 S3′ sRef Ezek@27 @16 S3′ sRef Ezek@27 @23 S3′ [3] That “embroidery” and “what is embroidered” denote the memory-knowledge that belongs to the external or natural man, is evident from the following passages in the Word. In Ezekiel:
Fine linen in embroidery from Egypt was thy spreading forth, blue and crimson from the isles of Elishah were thy covering. Syria was thy trader by reason of the multitude of thy works, with chrysoprase, crimson, and broidered work, and fine linen. The traders of Sheba with bales of blue and broidered work (Ezek. 27:7, 16, 24);
treating of Tyre, by which are signified those who are in the knowledges of truth and of good, and in the abstract sense these knowledges themselves (n. 1201). By “fine linen in embroidery” is signified memory-truth, for “fine linen” denotes truth from a celestial origin (n. 5319, 9469), and “embroidery” denotes memory-knowledge; and therefore it is said to come “from Egypt,” because by “Egypt” is signified memory-knowledge (n. 1164, 1186, 1462, 2588, 4749, 4964, 4966, 5700, 5702, 6004, 6015, 6125, 6651, 6679, 6683, 6692, 6750, 7779, 9391); and also to come “from Syria” and” Sheba,” because by “Syria” is signified the knowledges of truth and of good (n. 1232, 1234, 3051, 3249, 3664, 3680, 4112), and in like manner by “Sheba” (n. 1171, 3240). The knowledges of truth and of good are the memory-knowledges of the church. Everyone who possesses the capacity of thinking intellectually, and of taking things into consideration, can see that in the above passage is not meant embroidery, nor fine linen, nor blue, nor crimson; but that by these things are signified such as are worthy of the Word, thus spiritual things that belong to heaven and the church.
sRef Ezek@26 @16 S4′ [4] In the same:
All the princes of the sea shall come down from their thrones, and shall cast away their mantles, and put off their broidered garments; they shall be clothed with terrors (Ezek. 26:16);
speaking here also of Tyre; “the princes of the sea” denote primary memory-knowledges, which are called dogmas (that “princes” denote primary things, see n. 1482, 2089, 5044; and “the sea” memory-knowledge in general, n. 28, 2850); “mantles” denote external truths; “embroideries” denote memory-truths, which are also external (that “garments” denote truths, see n. 2576, 4545, 4763, 5248, 5319, 5954, 6914, 6917, 6918, 9093, 9158, 9212, 9216).
sRef Ezek@16 @10 S5′ sRef Ezek@16 @18 S5′ sRef Ezek@16 @13 S5′ [5] In the same:
I clothed thee with broidered work, and shod thee with badger; I girded thee about with fine linen, and covered thee with silk. Thus wast thou adorned with gold and silver; and thy garments were of fine linen, and silk, and broidered work. But thou hast taken the garments of thy broidered work, and hast covered images, with which thou didst commit whoredom (Ezek. 16:10, 13, 16, 18);
speaking of Jerusalem, by which is signified the church; “garments of broidered work” denote memory-truths; “covering images with which whoredom was committed,” denotes to confirm falsities, for “committing whoredom” denotes to pervert truths by applying them to falsities or evils. Who does not see that by “fine linen,” “silk,” and “broidered work,” are not here meant fine linen, silk, and embroidered work? For the subject treated of is Jerusalem. But what is meant the Christian world does not inquire, because it places the celestial and spiritual things of the Word in its literal sense, and calls its interior ones mystical things that it does not care for.
sRef Ezek@17 @3 S6′ sRef Judg@5 @30 S6′ sRef Ps@45 @13 S6′ sRef Ps@45 @14 S6′ [6] In the same:
A great eagle, with great wings, with long pinions, full of feathers, which had embroidery (Ezek. 17:3);
speaking of the house of Israel, by which is signified the spiritual church, which is called an “eagle” from perception (n. 3901, 8764); its having “embroidery” denotes that it has memory-knowledge. In David:
The King’s daughter is all glorious within; her garment is of interweavings of gold. She is brought unto the King in broidered work (Ps. 45:13, 14);
where “the King’s daughter” denotes the affection of truth, “broidered work” denotes the memory-knowledge of truth. In the book of Judges:
They shall divide the spoil, to Sisera a spoil of colors, a spoil of colors of embroidered work, the color of the broidered works on the necks of the spoil (Judg. 5:30);
the song of Deborah and Barak, where “broidered work” denotes the memory-knowledge which is of the natural man.
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9689 sRef Ex@26 @37 S0′ 9689. And thou shalt make for the covering five pillars of shittim. That this signifies the support of the uniting intermediate, as far as is sufficient, through the good of merit that belongs to the Lord’s Divine Human, is evident from the signification of “the covering for the door of the Tent,” as being the intermediate that unites the second or middle heaven with the first or ultimate heaven (of which above, n. 9686); from the signification of “five,” as being some part, or somewhat (n. 4638), and also as much as is sufficient; from the signification of “pillars,” as being support (n. 9674); and from the signification of “shittim wood,” as being the good of merit that belongs to the Lord alone (n. 9472, 9486), thus His Divine Human, because to this belongs merit (n. 9486).

AC (Potts) n. 9690 sRef Ex@26 @37 S0′ 9690. And shalt overlay them with gold. That this signifies a representative of good, is evident from the signification of “overlaying with gold,” and “making of gold,” as being a representative of good (see n. 9510).

AC (Potts) n. 9691 sRef Ex@26 @37 S0′ 9691. And their hooks shall be of gold. That this signifies the methods of conjunction by means of good, may be seen above (n. 9676).

AC (Potts) n. 9692 sRef Ex@26 @37 S0′ 9692. And thou shalt cast for them five bases of brass. That this signifies power from external good, is evident from the signification of “bases,” as being the power which supports (see n. 9643); and from the signification of “brass,” as being natural good, or external good (n. 425, 1551).

AC (Potts) n. 9693 9693. CONTINUATION CONCERNING THE FIRST EARTH SEEN IN THE STARRY HEAVEN.
After I had been carried across that great chasm, I at last arrived at a place where I stayed; and then spirits appeared to me above, with whom it was granted to speak. From their speech, and their peculiar way of looking at things, and of setting them forth, I clearly perceived that they were from another earth; for they were quite different from the spirits of our solar system. On the other hand they too noticed from my speech that I had come from afar.

AC (Potts) n. 9694 9694. After speaking together for a while about various matters, I asked them what God they worship. They said they worship a certain angel who appears to them as a Divine man, for he flashes with light; and he instructs them and enables them to perceive what they ought to do. They said further that the Great God is in the Sun of the angelic heaven, and that He appears to their angel, but not to themselves; and that He is so great that they do not dare to adore Him.

AC (Potts) n. 9695 9695. The angel whom they worshiped was an angelic society, to which it was granted by the Lord to preside over them, and to teach them the way of what is just and right. Therefore they have light from a certain flame, which appears like a fiery and yellow torch. The reason of this is that they do not worship the Lord; and consequently have no light from the Sun of the angelic heaven, but from an angelic society; for when allowed by the Lord, an angelic society can present such a light to spirits who are in a lower sphere.

AC (Potts) n. 9696 9696. For the rest, they were modest, somewhat simple, but still thought very well. The nature of their understanding could be inferred from the light they had; for the understanding is according to the reception of the light which is in the heavens; because the Divine truth which proceeds from the Lord as a Sun is what shines there, and enables the angels not only to see, but also to understand.

AC (Potts) n. 9697 9697. They were questioned about the sun of their world, which gives light to their earth; and they said that to them the sun has a flaming appearance. And when I represented to them the size of the sun of our earth, they said that their sun is smaller; but to our eyes their sun appears as a star; and I was told by the angels that it is one of the smaller stars. They also said that the starry heaven is seen from their earth.

AC (Potts) n. 9698 9698. I was instructed that the inhabitants and spirits of that earth relate in the Grand Man to something in the spleen, which was confirmed by an influx into the spleen while they were talking with me.

AC (Potts) n. 9699 9699. My sight was afterward opened so that I could in some measure look upon their earth itself, and there appeared many meadows and forests with trees in foliage, and also woolly sheep.

AC (Potts) n. 9700 9700. The subject of the First Earth seen in the Starry Heaven will be continued at the end of the following chapter.

AC (Potts) n. 9701 9701. CHAPTER THE TWENTY-SEVENTH.

THE DOCTRINE OF CHARITY AND OF FAITH

Something shall now be said about the Internal and the External Man.

AC (Potts) n. 9702 9702. They who have only a general idea about the Internal and the External Man, believe that it is the Internal Man which thinks and wills, and the External Man which speaks and acts; because to think and to will are internal, and from these to speak and act is external.

AC (Potts) n. 9703 9703. But be it known that it is not only the Internal Man that thinks and wills, but also the External; yet in one way when they are conjoined, and in another when they are separated.

AC (Potts) n. 9704 9704. When a man thinks intelligently and wills wisely, he thinks and wills from the Internal Man; but when he does not think intelligently and will wisely, he does not think and will from the Internal Man. Consequently, when a man thinks well about the Lord and about what belongs to the Lord, and when he thinks well about the neighbor and what belongs to the neighbor, and when he also wills well to these, he then thinks and wills from the Internal Man. But when a man thinks evilly in regard to these, and bears them ill will, he then does not think and will from the Internal Man. To think well is from the faith of truth, and to will well is from the love of good; but to think evilly is from the faith of what is false, and to will evilly is from the love of what is evil.

AC (Potts) n. 9705 9705. In a word, insofar as a man is in love to the Lord and in love toward the neighbor, so far he is in the Internal Man, and thinks and wills and also speaks and acts from it; but insofar as a man is in the love of self and in the love of the world, so far he is in the External Man, and insofar as he dares, he also speaks and acts from it.

AC (Potts) n. 9706 9706. The reason is that man has been created according to the image of heaven and the image of the world; the Internal Man according to the image of heaven, and the External Man according to the image of the world. Wherefore to think and will from the Internal Man is to think and will from heaven, that is, through heaven from the Lord; but to think and will from the External Man is to think and will from the world, that is, through the world from self.

AC (Potts) n. 9707 9707. It has been so provided and ordained by the Lord that insofar as a man thinks and wills from heaven, that is, through heaven from the Lord, so far his Internal Man is opened: the opening is unto heaven, even unto the Lord Himself. Therefore, on the other hand, insofar as a man thinks and wills from the world, that is, through the world from self, so far the Internal Man is closed, and the External Man is opened: the opening is unto the world and unto self.

AC (Potts) n. 9708 9708. In order that the External Man may be reduced into order, it must be made subordinate to the Internal Man, and it is made subordinate when it obeys. So far as this is effected, so far the External Man also is wise. This is meant by the old man with its evil affections needing to die in order that the man may become a new creature.

AC (Potts) n. 9709 9709. Those with whom the Internal Man has been closed, do not know that there is an Internal Man, neither do they believe that there is a heaven and an eternal life. And wonderful to say they nevertheless suppose that they think more wisely than others; for they love themselves and what belongs to them, and these they worship. It is otherwise in the case of those with whom the Internal Man has been opened toward heaven unto the Lord, for these are in the light of heaven, thus in illumination from the Lord; whereas the former are not in the light of heaven, but in the light of the world, and thus in illumination from self. Those who are illumined from self, and not from the Lord, see falsity as truth and evil as good.

EXODUS 27

1. And thou shalt make the altar of shittim wood, five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth; the altar shall be foursquare; and the height thereof shall be three cubits.
2. And thou shalt make its horns upon the four corners thereof; from it shall be its horns; and thou shalt overlay it with brass.
3. And thou shalt make its pans to take away its ashes, and its shovels, and its basins, and its fleshhooks, and its fire-tongs; all the vessels thereof thou shalt make of brass.
4. And thou shalt make for it a grating, a network of brass; and upon the net shalt thou make four rings of brass, upon the four extremities of it.
5. And thou shalt bestow it under the compass of the altar beneath, and the net shall be even unto the middle of the altar.
6. And thou shalt make staves for the altar, staves of shittim wood, and shalt overlay them with brass.
7. And the staves thereof shall be put into the rings, and the staves shall be upon the two sides of the altar, in carrying it.
8. Hollow of boards shalt thou make it; as thou wast made to see in the mountain, so shall they make it.
9. And thou shalt make the court of the Habitation at the corner of the south southward; the hangings for the court shall be of fine twined linen, a hundred cubits the length at the one corner.
10. And the pillars thereof shall be twenty, and their bases twenty, of brass; the hooks of the pillars and their fillets shall be of silver.
11. And so at the corner of the north in length, there shall be hangings a hundred cubits in length, and the pillars there of twenty, and their bases twenty, of brass; the hooks of the pillars and their fillets of silver.
12. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the sea shall be hangings of fifty cubits; their pillars ten, and their bases ten.
13. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the east eastward shall be fifty cubits.
14. And the hangings for the one wing shall be fifteen cubits; the pillars thereof three, and their bases three.
15. And for the other wing shall be hangings of fifteen cubits; the pillars thereof three, and their bases three.
16. And for the gate of the court a covering of twenty cubits, of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen, the work of the embroiderer; its pillars four, and their bases four.
17. All the pillars of the court round about shall be filleted with fillets of silver; their hooks of silver, and their bases of brass.
18. The length of the court shall be a hundred cubits, and the breadth fifty by fifty; and the height five cubits, of fine twined linen, and their bases of brass.
19. And as for all the vessels of the Habitation in all the service thereof, all the pegs thereof, and all the pegs of the court, shall be of brass.
20. And thou shalt command the sons of Israel, and let them take unto thee olive oil, pure, beaten, for the luminary, to cause the lamp to go up continually.
21. In the Tent of meeting, without the veil which is over the Testimony, Aaron and his sons shall order it from evening until morning before Jehovah; a statute of an age for their generations with the sons of Israel.

AC (Potts) n. 9710 sRef Ex@27 @0 S0′ 9710. THE CONTENTS.

In this chapter, in the internal sense, the subject treated of is the worship of the Lord from the good of love. This worship is signified by “the altar,” and is described in general by all things relating to the altar.

AC (Potts) n. 9711 sRef Ex@27 @0 S0′ 9711. Afterward the subject treated of is the ultimate heaven, which is represented and described by “the court.”

AC (Potts) n. 9712 sRef Ex@27 @0 S0′ 9712. Lastly the subject treated of is the good of charity, through which the spiritual heaven is illumined by the Lord in the truths of faith; these things are signified by “the oil of olive,” and by “the luminary.”

AC (Potts) n. 9713 9713. THE INTERNAL SENSE.
Verses 1-8. And thou shalt make the altar of shittim wood, five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth; the altar shall be foursquare; and the height thereof shall be three cubits. And thou shalt make its horns upon the four corners thereof; from it shall be its horns; and thou shalt overlay it with brass. And thou shalt make its pans to take away its ashes, and its shovels, and its basins, and its fleshhooks, and its fire-tongs; all the vessels thereof thou shalt make of brass. And thou shalt make for it a grating, a network of brass; and upon the net shalt thou make four rings of brass, upon the four extremities of it. And thou shalt bestow it under the compass of the altar beneath, and the net shall be even unto the middle of the altar. And thou shalt make staves for the altar, staves of shittim wood, and shalt overlay them with brass. And the staves thereof shall be put into the rings, and the staves shall be upon the two sides of the altar, in carrying it. Hollow of boards shalt thou make it; as thou wast made to see in the mountain, so shall they make it. “And thou shalt make the altar,” signifies a representative of the Lord and of the worship of Him; “of shittim wood,” signifies righteousness; “five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth,” signifies equally from good and from truth; “the altar shall be foursquare,” signifies thus what is righteous; “and the height thereof shall be three cubits,” signifies full in respect to degrees; “and thou shalt make its horns,” signifies power; “upon the four corners thereof,” signifies complete power; “from it shall be its horns,” signifies that the power shall be from good; “and thou shalt overlay it with brass,” signifies a representative of good; “and thou shalt make its pans to take away its ashes,” signifies what is to be removed after uses; “and its shovels, and its basins, and its fleshhooks, and its fire-tongs,” signifies memory- knowledges that contain and that are of service for every use; “all the vessels thereof thou shalt make of brass,” signifies all things from good; ” and thou shalt make for it a grating, a network,” signifies the sensuous, which is the ultimate; “of brass,” signifies which also is from good; “and upon the net shalt thou make four rings of brass,” signifies the sphere of good through which there is conjunction; “upon the four extremities of it,” signifies everywhere; “and thou shalt bestow it under the compass of the altar beneath,” signifies this in ultimates; “and the net shall be even unto the middle of the altar,” signifies the extension of the sensuous; “and thou shalt make staves for the altar,” signifies the power of keeping in a state of good; “staves of shittim wood,” signifies the good of righteousness and the consequent power; “and shalt overlay them with brass,” signifies a representative of good; “and the staves thereof shall be put into the rings,” signifies the power of the sphere of Divine good; “and the staves shall be upon the two sides of the altar,” signifies the power of good through truth, and of truth from good; “in carrying it,” signifies coming-forth and subsistence; “hollow of boards shalt thou make it,” signifies application; “as thou wast made to see in the mountain, so shall they make it,” signifies from the correspondence of Divine things in heaven.

AC (Potts) n. 9714 sRef Ex@27 @1 S0′ 9714. And thou shalt make the altar. That this signifies a representative of the Lord and of the worship of Him, is evident from the signification of “the altar which was for burnt- offerings and sacrifices,” as being a representative of the Lord; and as by “the burnt-offerings and sacrifices” were signified all things of the worship of the Lord, therefore also the altar was a representative of the worship of Him. The Lord, however, is not worshiped by means of burnt-offerings and sacrifices, but by means of those things which were represented thereby, which are celestial things of love and spiritual things of faith (see n. 922, 923, 1823, 2180, 2805, 2807, 2830, 3519, 6905, 8680, 8936).
sRef Matt@23 @19 S2′ sRef Matt@23 @16 S2′ sRef John@2 @20 S2′ sRef Matt@23 @18 S2′ sRef Matt@23 @17 S2′ sRef John@2 @21 S2′ sRef John@2 @19 S2′ sRef Matt@23 @21 S2′ sRef Matt@23 @22 S2′ sRef Matt@23 @20 S2′ [2] There were two things by which was represented the Lord as to the Divine Human: the temple and the altar. That this was represented by the temple, He Himself teaches in John:
Jesus said, Take apart this temple, and in three days I will raise it up. He spoke of the temple of His body (John 2:19, 21).
That the same was represented by the altar can also be seen from His own words when He speaks of the temple and at the same time of the altar, in Matthew:
Ye fools and blind, because ye say, Whosoever shall swear by the temple, it is nothing; but whosoever shall swear by the gold of the temple, he is guilty. Which is the greater, the gold, or the temple that sanctifieth the gold? Likewise, Whosoever shall swear by the altar, it is nothing; but whosoever shall swear by the gift that is upon it, he is guilty. Ye fools and blind; for which is the greater, the gift, or the altar that sanctifieth the gift? He that shall swear by the altar, sweareth by it, and by everything that is upon it. And he that shall swear by the temple, sweareth by it, and by Him that dwelleth therein. And he that shall swear by heaven, sweareth by the throne of God, and by Him that sitteth thereon (Matt. 23:16-22).
From this it is evident that, as the temple, so also the altar was a representative of the Lord’s Divine Human; for the same is said of the altar as of the temple, namely, that it is that which sanctifieth the gift that is upon it; thus that the altar was the subject from which came the sanctification; consequently that it also was a representative of the Lord’s Divine Human, from which all that is holy proceeds. But the altar was a representative of the Lord in respect to His Divine good; whereas the temple was a representative of Him in respect to His Divine truth, thus in respect to heaven; for the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord makes heaven. For this reason it is said of the temple that “he that shall swear by the temple, sweareth by it and by Him that dwelleth therein”; and it is added that “he that shall swear by heaven, sweareth by the throne of God, and by Him that sitteth thereon.” “The throne of God” denotes the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, thus heaven, and “He that sitteth thereon” denotes the Lord (n. 5313). The same that was represented by the temple, was represented also by the Habitation; the Lord in respect to Divine truth being there denoted by “the Testimony” which was in the ark (n. 9503).
sRef Ex@29 @37 S3′ sRef Lev@6 @13 S3′ [3] As the altar represented the Lord in respect to Divine good, it was the very holy of holies, and sanctified everything that touched it; as can be seen from what follows in this book, where it is said, “Seven days thou shalt make atonement for the altar, and sanctify it; that the altar may be a holy of holies, and everything that shall touch it shall be made holy” (Exod. 29:37); and therefore the fire upon the altar was perpetually burning, and was never put out (Lev. 6:13); and from that fire was taken the fire for the incense, and from no other source (Lev. 10:1-6); for by “the fire of the altar” was signified the Divine good of the Lord’s Divine love (n. 5215, 6314, 6832, 6834, 6849).
sRef Ps@26 @6 S4′ sRef Ps@43 @4 S4′ sRef Ps@43 @3 S4′ sRef Ps@26 @7 S4′ [4] That the altar was a representative of the Lord, is evident from the following passages in David:
Let Thy light and Thy truth bring me unto the mountain of Thy holiness, and unto Thy habitations, that I may go in unto the altar of God, unto God (Ps. 43:3, 4).
I wash mine hands in innocency; and I compass Thine altar, O Jehovah (Ps. 26:6).
sRef Isa@60 @7 S5′ sRef Lam@2 @7 S5′ [5] But that the altar was a representative of the worship of the Lord, is evident from these passages:
All the flocks of Arabia shall be gathered together to thee; the rams of Nebaioth shall minister to thee; they shall come up with acceptance on Mine altar (Isa. 60:7).
The Lord hath forsaken His altar, He hath abhorred His sanctuary (Lam. 2:7);
where “to forsake the altar” denotes to abolish the representative of the worship of the Lord from the good of love; “to abhor the sanctuary” denotes to abolish the representative of the worship of the Lord from the truths of faith.
sRef Ezek@6 @6 S6′ sRef Ezek@6 @4 S6′ sRef Isa@27 @9 S6′ sRef Ezek@6 @5 S6′ [6] In Ezekiel:
Your altars shall be destroyed; I will scatter your bones round about your altars; and your altars shall be laid waste, and made desolate; and your idols shall be broken, and shall cease (Ezek. 6:5, 6);
“to destroy, lay waste, and desolate the altars” denotes that so it shall be with representative worship. In Isaiah:
The iniquity of Jacob shall not be expiated, when he shall put all the stones of the altar as chalkstones that are scattered (Isa. 27:9);
where “the stones of the altar that are scattered” denote all the truths of worship.
sRef Isa@17 @8 S7′ sRef Isa@17 @7 S7′ [7] Again:
In that day shall a man look unto his Maker, and his eyes unto the Holy One of Israel. And he shall not look unto the altars, the work of his hands, and to that which his fingers have made (Isa. 17:7, 8);
where “the altars which are the work of his hands and that which his fingers have made” denote worship from one’s own intelligence.
sRef Hos@10 @8 S8′ sRef Hos@8 @11 S8′ [8] In Hosea:
Ephraim hath multiplied altars for sinning (Hos. 8:11);
where “multiplying altars for sinning” denotes to invent worthless things of worship. In the same:
The thistle and the thorn shall come up on their altars (Hos. 10:8);
denoting that evils and falsities shall enter in and make the worship.
sRef Isa@19 @19 S9′ [9] In Isaiah:
In that day there shall be an altar to Jehovah in the midst of Egypt (Isa. 19:19);
where “an altar to Jehovah” denotes the worship of the Lord.
[10] As the altar described in this chapter was portable, it was made of shittim wood, and was overlaid with brass; but the altar which was to remain in its place was made either of earth or of unhewn stones. The altar made of earth was the principal representative of the worship of the Lord from the good of love; and the altar made of unhewn stones was a representative of worship from the goods and truths of faith (n. 8935, 8940); while the portable altar here described was a representative of the worship of the Lord from the good of love. For this reason it was of shittim wood and was overlaid with brass.

AC (Potts) n. 9715 sRef Ex@27 @1 S0′ 9715. Of shittim wood. That this signifies righteousness, is evident from the signification of “shittim wood,” as being the good of merit and of righteousness that belongs to the Lord alone (see n. 9472, 9486); it shall here be stated what are the righteousness and the merit that belong to the Lord alone. It is believed that the Lord had merit and righteousness because He fulfilled all things of the law, and because by the passion of the cross He saved the human race; yet these things are not meant in the Word by the righteousness and merit of the Lord; but by His merit and righteousness is meant that He fought alone with all the hells, and subjugated them, and thus reduced into order all things in the hells, and at the same time all things in the heavens. For with every man there are spirits from hell, and also angels from heaven; without these man cannot possibly live; and unless the hells had been subjugated by the Lord, and the heavens brought back into order, no man could have been saved.
[2] This could not have been effected except by means of His Human; that is, through combats with the hells from His Human. And as the Lord did this from His own power, thus alone, therefore to the Lord alone belong merit and righteousness; and therefore it is He alone who still conquers the hells with man; for He who once conquers them, conquers them forever. Wherefore absolutely nothing of merit and righteousness belongs to man; but the merit and righteousness of the Lord are imputed to him when he acknowledges that nothing is from himself, but everything from the Lord. From this it is that the Lord alone regenerates man; for to regenerate man is to drive away the hells from him, consequently the evils and falsities which are from the hells, and to implant heaven in their stead; that is, the goods of love and the truths of faith, for these make heaven. Moreover, by means of continual combats with the hells the Lord glorified His Human, that is, made it Divine; for as man is regenerated by means of combats which are temptations, so the Lord was glorified by means of combats which were temptations. Consequently the glorification of the Human of the Lord by His own power is merit and righteousness; for thereby man has been saved, for thereby all the hells are kept by the Lord in subjection forever.
sRef Isa@63 @1 S3′ sRef Isa@63 @8 S3′ sRef Isa@63 @2 S3′ sRef Isa@63 @6 S3′ sRef Isa@63 @4 S3′ sRef Isa@63 @7 S3′ sRef Isa@63 @3 S3′ sRef Isa@63 @5 S3′ [3] That this is so is evident from the passages in the Word where the merit and righteousness of the Lord are treated of; as in Isaiah:
Who is this that cometh from Edom, with sprinkled garments from Bozrah? marching in the multitude of His strength? I that speak in righteousness, great to save. Wherefore art Thou red in Thy garments, and Thy garment like his that treadeth in the winepress? I have trodden the winepress alone; and of the people there was no man with Me; therefore I have trodden them in Mine anger; whence their victory has been sprinkled upon My garments, and I have soiled all My raiment. For the day of vengeance was in Mine heart, and the year of My redeemed had come. I looked around, but there was none to help; and I was amazed, but there was none to uphold; therefore Mine arm brought salvation to Me; and My wrath sustained Me. And I trampled the peoples in Mine anger, and I brought down their victory to the earth. Therefore He became the Savior (Isa. 63:1-8);
that these things are said of the Lord, is known; His combats with the hells are described by His “garments being sprinkled,” by His “being red in His garments,” by His “garments being like his that treadeth in the winepress,” and by “the days of vengeance.” His victories and subjugations of the hells are described by His “treading them in His anger,” whereby “their victory was sprinkled upon His garments,” by His “trampling the peoples in anger,” and “bringing down their victory to the earth.” That the Lord did these things from His own power, is described by His “treading the winepress alone,” and by “there being of the peoples no man with Him;” also by His “looking around, but there was none to help;” and by His “being amazed, but there was none to uphold;” likewise by His “own arm bringing salvation unto Him.” That from this came salvation, is described by His “marching in the multitude of His strength, mighty to save,” by “the year of His redeemed being come,” and by His “therefore becoming the Savior.” sRef Isa@59 @16 S4′ sRef Isa@51 @5 S4′ sRef Isa@59 @17 S4′ [4] That all these things belong to righteousness, appears still more clearly in other passages in the same prophet:
He saw that there was no man, and was amazed that there was none to intercede; therefore His arm performed salvation for Him, and His righteousness upheld Him; whence He put on righteousness as a coat of mail, and a helmet of salvation upon His head; He put on garments of vengeance, and covered Himself with zeal as with a cloak (Isa. 59:18, 17).
My righteousness is near, My salvation hath gone forth, and Mine arms shall judge the peoples; in Me shall the islands hope, and upon Mine arm shall they trust (Isa. 51:6);
“the arm which performed salvation for Him, and upon which they shall trust,” denotes His own power, by which He subjugated the hells (that “the arm” denotes power, see n. 4932, 7205). From this it is clear what is meant by “the righteousness and merit that belong to the Lord alone.”
sRef Ps@71 @24 S5′ sRef Isa@41 @2 S5′ sRef Isa@61 @10 S5′ sRef Dan@9 @24 S5′ sRef Isa@46 @13 S5′ sRef Ps@71 @18 S5′ sRef Ps@71 @17 S5′ sRef Ps@71 @15 S5′ sRef Ps@71 @16 S5′ sRef Jer@23 @6 S5′ sRef Ps@71 @19 S5′ sRef Jer@23 @5 S5′ [5] In like manner in other passages:
Who hath stirred up one from the east, whom He hath called in righteousness to follow Him? He hath given nations before Him, and made Him to rule over kings (Isa. 41:2).
I have brought near My righteousness, it is not far off, My salvation shall not tarry (Isa. 46:13).
Jehovah will clothe me with garments of salvation, He hath covered me with the mantle of righteousness (Isa. 61:10).
My mouth shall recount Thy righteousness, Thy salvation all the day; I know not the numberings; I will make mention of Thy righteousness, forsake me not until I have declared Thine arm, Thy might, for Thy righteousness is even unto the height; Thou who hast done great things (Ps. 71:15, 16, 18, 19, 24).
Behold the days come when I will raise unto David a righteous offshoot, who shall reign as king, and shall prosper, and shall do judgment and righteousness in the earth. In those days Judah shall be saved, and Israel shall dwell securely; and this is His name whereby they shall call Him, Jehovah our Righteousness (Jer. 23:5-6; 33:15-16).
Seventy weeks have been decreed to expiate iniquity, and to bring in the righteousness of the ages (Dan. 9:24).
[6] That the subjugation of the hells, the setting in order of the heavens by the Lord, the glorification of His Human, and the consequent salvation for the man who receives the Lord in love and faith, are the righteousness and merit that belong to the Lord alone, can be seen from the passages above quoted. But those cannot apprehend this matter who are not aware that there are with man spirits from the hells, and that from them he has evils and falsities; and also that there are angels from heaven with him, and that from them he has goods and truths; and that thus on the one side the life of man is joined to the hells, and on the other to the heavens, that is, through the heavens to the Lord; and thus that man could not possibly be saved unless the hells had been subjugated, and the heavens reduced into order, and in this manner all things made subject to the Lord.
[7] From all this it can be seen why (as said above, n. 9486) the good of the Lord’s merit is the only good that reigns in the heavens; for this good of merit is even now the continual subjugation of the hells, and thus the protection of the faithful. This good is the good of the Lord’s love; for from the Divine love He fought and conquered in the world. From the Divine power in the Human thence acquired, He alone forever fights and conquers for heaven and the church; and thus for the whole human race, and thereby saves them. This then is the good of merit, which is called “righteousness,” because it belongs to righteousness to restrain the hells which are endeavoring to destroy the human race; and to protect and save the good and faithful. (Concerning the combats or temptations of the Lord while He was in the world, see n. 1663, 1668, 1690-1692, 1737, 1787, 1812, 1813, 1820, 2776, 2786, 2795, 2803, 2814, 2816, 4287, 7193, 8273; and that the Lord alone fights for the human race against the hells, n. 1692, 6574, 8159, 8172, 8175, 8176, 8273, 8969.)

AC (Potts) n. 9716 sRef Ex@27 @1 S0′ 9716. Five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth. That this signifies equally from good and from truth, is evident from the signification of “five,” as being equally; for when two things are alike, as in this case the length and the breadth, there is equality. The length and the breadth of the altar were five cubits, because “five” signifies also the same as “ten,” “a hundred,” and “a thousand,” and by these numbers is signified much, all, what is full; and in the supreme sense which treats of the Lord, what is infinite; therefore such also is the signification of “five;” for compound numbers signify the like as the simple numbers of which they are composed, and therefore the simple numbers the like as their compounds (n. 5291, 5335, 5708, 7973). (That “ten,” “a hundred,” and “a thousand” denote much, all, and what is full, see n. 2636, 3107, 4400, 4638, 8715; likewise “five,” n. 5708, 5956, 9102; and that “a thousand” when said of the Divine denotes what is infinite, n. 2575.)
And from the signification of “length,” as being good (n. 1613, 9487); and from the signification of “breadth,” as being truth (n. 1613, 3433, 3434, 4482, 9487). From this it is evident that by “five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth” is signified equally from good and from truth. It is said “equally from good and from truth,” when truth is of good and good is of truth; thus when good and truth act as one, and form a marriage, such as is in heaven from the Lord. This can be illustrated by the understanding and the will in man; when the understanding acts as one with the will, that is, when man perceives truth to be of good, and good to be of truth, then he partakes equally of good and of truth. Moreover, the understanding has been appointed for the perception of truth from good, and the will for the perception of good in truth.

AC (Potts) n. 9717 sRef Ex@28 @16 S0′ sRef Rev@21 @16 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @1 S0′ sRef Ex@30 @2 S0′ 9717. The altar shall be foursquare. That this signifies thus what is righteous, is evident from the signification of “foursquare,” as being what is righteous (of which in what follows); and from the signification of “the altar,” as being a representative of the Lord, and of the worship of Him. Consequently by “the altar being foursquare” is signified what is righteous in the Lord, and consequently in worship. Worship is said to be “righteous” when the good and truth which are in it are from the Lord, and not from man; for what is righteous is from the Lord alone (see n. 9263). That “foursquare” denotes what is righteous, originates in the representatives in the other life. There, goods are presented as round, and the goods of the external man, which are called “righteous,” are presented as foursquare; but truths and rights are presented as linear and triangular. From this then it is that by “foursquare” is signified what is righteous, as also by “the altar of incense being foursquare” (Exod. 30:2), and by “the breastplate of judgment being a doubled square” (Exod. 28:16), and likewise by “the New Jerusalem being foursquare” (Rev. 21:16). The “New Jerusalem” here denotes the New Church of the Lord which is to succeed our present church; the external good of it, which is what is righteous, is signified by its being “foursquare.”

AC (Potts) n. 9718 sRef Ex@27 @1 S0′ 9718. And the height thereof shall be three cubits. That this signifies full in respect to degrees, is evident from the signification of “three,” as being what is full (see n. 4495, 7715, 9488, 9489); and from the signification of “height,” as being degrees in respect to good (n. 9489).

AC (Potts) n. 9719 sRef Ex@27 @2 S0′ 9719. And thou shalt make its horns. That this signifies power, is evident from the signification of “horns,” as being the power of truth from good (see n. 2832, 9081).

AC (Potts) n. 9720 sRef Ex@27 @2 S0′ 9720. Upon the four corners thereof. That this signifies complete power, is evident from the signification of “four,” as being conjunction (see n. 9601, 9674); and from the signification of “corners,” as being stability and strength (n. 9494), also all things of truth and of good (n. 9642). Wherefore by “the horns upon the four corners” is signified complete power.

AC (Potts) n. 9721 sRef Ex@27 @2 S0′ 9721. From it shall be its horns. That this signifies that the power shall be from good, is evident from the signification of “the altar,” from which the horns were to be, as being a representative of the Lord, and of the worship of Him from the good of love (see n. 9714); and from the signification of “horns,” as being power (n. 9719). From this it is evident that by “the horns being from it” is signified that the power shall be from good. (That in the spiritual world all power is of good through truth, see n. 6344, 6423, 9643.)

AC (Potts) n. 9722 sRef Ex@27 @2 S0′ 9722. And thou shalt overlay it with brass. That this signifies a representative of good, is evident from the signification of “brass,” as being natural or external good (see n. 425, 1551). That the overlaying with, and putting on, of brass, is a representative of this good, is manifest.

AC (Potts) n. 9723 sRef Ex@27 @3 S0′ 9723. And thou shalt make its pans, to take away its ashes. That this signifies what is to be removed after uses, is evident from the signification of “the pans for taking away the ashes,” as being the things that effect removal after uses. For “ashes” signify such things in man’s natural or external memory as remain after uses, and have to be removed so as not to prevent other things from taking their place, by means of which there may again be uses. The “pans” denote such things as effect removal, because by them the ashes are taken away. That it may be known what is signified by the “ashes” which remained upon the altar after a burnt-offering or sacrifice, it shall first be told how the case is with the things which remain in man after uses. From his infancy up to the end of his life in the world, a man is being perfected as to intelligence and wisdom; and if it is well with him, as to faith and love. Memory-knowledges chiefly conduce to this use. These knowledges are imbibed by hearing, seeing, and reading, and are stored up in the external or natural memory. These are of service to the internal sight or understanding as a plane of objects, from which it may choose and bring out such things as promote wisdom. For by virtue of its light, which is from heaven, the interior sight or understanding looks into this plane, that is, into this memory, which is below itself; and from the various things which are there, it chooses and brings out such as agree with its love. These it calls forth to itself from thence, and stores them up in its own memory, which is the internal memory (concerning which see n. 2469-2494). From this is the life of the internal man, and its intelligence and wisdom. The case is the same with the things that belong to spiritual intelligence and wisdom, which are those of faith and love. Memory-knowledges, that is to say, memory-knowledges from the Word, or from the doctrine of the church, which are called the knowledges of truth and good, are in like manner of service for implanting in the internal man these things of spiritual intelligence and wisdom. When these knowledges are stored up in the memory of the external man, they are in like manner of service as objects to the sight of the internal man, which sees from the light of heaven, and from them chooses and brings out such things as are in agreement with its love; for the internal man sees nothing else in, the external man. For the things which a man loves, he sees in the light, but the things which he does not love, he sees in the shade; the latter he rejects, but the former he chooses.
[2] From all this it can be seen how the case is with the truths of faith and the goods of love with the man who is being regenerated; namely, that the good of love chooses for itself suitable truths of faith, and by their means perfects itself; and thus the good of love is in the first place, and the truth of faith in the second, as often shown before (n. 3325, 3494, 3539, 3548, 3556, 3563, 3570, 3576, 3603, 3701, 4925, 4977, 6256, 6269, 6272, 6273). After the memory-knowledges, or the knowledges of good and truth, in the memory of the external man, have performed this use, they as it were vanish from this memory. They are circumstanced like those matters of instruction which have served the man from infancy as means for perfecting his moral and civil life; after these have performed this use, and the man has acquired life therefrom, they perish from the memory, and remain only as a matter of practice or use. In this way man learns to speak, to think, to discriminate, and to judge, to lead a moral life, and to conduct himself becomingly; in a word, he learns languages, good manners, intelligence, and wisdom.
sRef Lev@6 @10 S3′ sRef Lev@6 @11 S3′ sRef Lev@6 @9 S3′ sRef Lev@6 @8 S3′ sRef Lev@6 @12 S3′ sRef Lev@6 @13 S3′ [3] The memory-knowledges which have served for these uses are signified by “the ashes which are to be removed;” and the knowledges of truth and of good, through which the man has gained spiritual life, after they have served this use, that is, after they have become of the life, are also signified by “the ashes of the altar which were to be removed.” But when they are being removed, they are first placed near the altar, and afterward are carried forth outside the camp into a clean place. Meanwhile the fire of the altar is always burning for the use of a new burnt-offering or sacrifice, according to the process described by Moses in Leviticus:
The priest shall cause the burnt-offering to ascend upon the hearth upon the altar all night even unto the dawn. Afterward he shall put on his linen clothing and his linen breeches, and he shall take up the ashes, into which the fire hath consumed the burnt-offering on the altar. Afterward he shall put off his garments, and shall put on other garments, and carry forth the ashes outside the camp into a clean place. But the fire upon the altar shall be burning, it shall not be put out; the priest shall burn wood on it at the dawn of every day; and he shall arrange the burnt-offering upon it, and shall burn upon it the fat of the sacrifices. The fire shall be burning upon the altar continually; it shall not be put out (Lev. 6:9-13);
all these particulars involve arcana of heaven, and signify the Divine things of the worship of the Lord from the good of love; what “the ashes” consequently signify has been told above. That something heavenly is signified by “the ashes of the altar” can be seen by everyone who reflects, as that when the priest was to take away the ashes from the altar, he was to put on clothing of linen and breeches of linen, and afterward in other garments was to carry them outside the camp, and lay them in a clean place. Nothing in the Word is worthless, not even any word, thus not any circumstance of this procedure.
[4] From all this it can in some measure be seen what is signified by “the ashes of the red cow that was burnt,” by means of which the water of separation and of cleansing was prepared, of which we read in Numbers 19:2-10, 17; and what is signified by “ashes” in the opposite sense, namely, what is condemned that remains after the burning from the fire of self love. This is signified by “the ashes” which they carried on the head, and in which they rolled themselves when bewailing their sins (Jer. 6:26; Ezek. 27:30; Jonah 3:6).
AC (Potts) n. 9724 sRef Ex@27 @3 S0′ 9724. And its shovels, and its basins, and its fleshhooks, and its fire-tongs. That this signifies memory-knowledges that contain and that are of service for every use, is evident from the signification of “vessels” in general, as being the things of the external memory; that is, memory-knowledges (see n. 3068, 3069); and, in holy things, as being the knowledges of good and truth, which are means for the worship of the Lord (see n. 9544). Such also is the meaning of the vessels for ministration about the altar; but each vessel there must signify memory-knowledges for a particular use; thus all the vessels there signify memory-knowledges that are of service for every use.

AC (Potts) n. 9725 sRef Ex@27 @3 S0′ 9725. All the vessels thereof thou shalt make of brass. That this signifies all things from good, is evident from the signification of “vessels,” as being memory-knowledges (of which just above, n. 9724), here all such knowledges, because it is said “all the vessels;” and from the signification of “brass,” as being external or natural good (see n. 425, 1551).

AC (Potts) n. 9726 sRef Ex@27 @4 S0′ 9726. And thou shalt make for it a grating, a network. That this signifies the sensuous, which is the ultimate, is evident from the signification of “a grating, a network,” as being the external sensuous, thus that which is the ultimate of life with man; and because it signifies the ultimate, it was put round about the altar. This sensuous was represented by “the grating” because in the first place it as it were sifts and separates the things which enter to man and are presented to the understanding and the will, thus truths and goods. If the sensuous is from good, it admits nothing but goods and truths which are from good, and rejects evils and the falsities which are from evil; for the sensuous is the perceptive and sensitive itself of the things of the understanding and of the will in the extremes, being formed precisely according to their affections. The nature of it may be illustrated by very many things in the body; for everywhere in the extremes of the body there are net-like forms, and as it were sieves or gratings, which sift the things that flow in from the world, admitting, from desire, those which are suitable, and rejecting, from aversion, those which are not suitable. There are such most exquisite forms in the stomach, which in accordance with the desires, and for the sake of use, admit into the blood what is suitable of the chyle, and reject what is unsuitable, in accordance with the aversion that is felt for things injurious. The case is similar with the sensuous, which is the ultimate of man’s life. But with man this has been completely destroyed, for the reason that it stands out nearest to the world, and therefore is the last to be regenerated, and at this day scarcely anyone can be regenerated as far as this; and what in consequence is the nature of this sensuous with such persons can be seen from what has been already shown about it (see n. 4009, 5077, 5081, 5084, 5094, 5125, 5128, 5580, 5767, 5774, 6183, 6201, 6310-6318, 6564, 6598, 6612, 6614, 6622, 6624, 6844, 6845, 6948, 6949, 7442, 7645, 7693, 9212, 9216). Therefore man is raised by the Lord from this sensuous toward more inward things, in order that he may see and take hold of the truths which are of faith, and the goods which are of love. But the sensuous which is signified by “the grating, a network round about the altar,” is the sensuous of the Lord’s Divine Human; for the altar is the representative of the Lord, and of the worship of Him from the good of love (n. 9714).

AC (Potts) n. 9727 sRef Ex@27 @4 S0′ 9727. Of brass. That this signifies which also is from good, is evident from the signification of “brass,” as being external or natural good (see n. 425, 1551). As by the “grating, a network round about the altar” is signified the sensuous of the Lord’s Divine Human (n. 9726), therefore the good which is here signified is the Divine good of His Divine love. All things of the Lord’s Divine Human are from this good.

AC (Potts) n. 9728 sRef Ex@27 @4 S0′ 9728. And upon the net shalt thou make four rings of brass. That this signifies the sphere of good through which there is conjunction, is evident from the signification of “the net,” as being the extreme of life that corresponds to the interior life, which is that of the understanding and of the will (of which just above, n. 9726); from the signification of “four,” as being conjunction (see n. 1686, 8877, 9601, 9674); from the signification of “the rings,” as being the sphere of Divine good and truth through which there is conjunction (n. 9498, 9501); and from the signification of “brass,” as being good (n. 9727).

AC (Potts) n. 9729 sRef Ex@27 @4 S0′ 9729. Upon the four extremities of it. That this signifies everywhere, is evident from the signification of “the four extremities,” as being everywhere (see n. 9666).

AC (Potts) n. 9730 sRef Ex@27 @5 S0′ 9730. And thou shalt bestow it under the compass of the altar beneath. That hereby is signified this in ultimates, is evident from the signification of “the grating, a network” which was to be put under the compass of the altar, as being the sensuous (of which above, n. 9726); from the signification of “the compass,” when said of the sensuous, as being the ultimate (that the external sensuous is the ultimate of life with man, see n. 9726); and from the signification of “beneath,” as being outward, for by higher things are signified interior things, and by lower things are signified exterior ones (n. 6952, 6954, 7814-7821, 8604); consequently by “above” or “upward” is signified inward; and by “beneath” or “downward” is signified outward. By the external sensuous is not meant the sense of the body itself, as its sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch, but that which is most nearly from these; for he is called a sensuous man who thinks and desires according to these senses of the body and their appetites, and considers no further. He who considers further, and examines what the sensuous desires, and what he himself thinks from the sensuous, is said to be raised above the sensuous, or to be withdrawn from it, and to think interiorly. This is the case with those at the present day who are in the good of charity and of faith. When this is done, the sensuous is quiescent, and is deprived of its active life which it has from the world and its objects. There are with man two determinations of the things of the understanding and of the will; one determination is outward toward the world, and the other is inward toward heaven. With natural and sensuous men, the determination of the things of the understanding and of the will, thus of the thoughts and affections, is toward the world; but with spiritual and celestial men the determination of these things is toward heaven, and also alternately toward the world. The hinge of the determinations turns inward when the man is being regenerated, and so far as it can then be turned inward, so far the man can be raised by the Lord toward heaven to Himself, and consequently be in the same proportion imbued with wisdom, faith, and love. For the man then lives in the internal man, consequently in his spirit, and the external man is subordinate thereto. But if a man does not suffer himself to be regenerated, then all his interiors remain determined toward the world, and then his life is in the external man, and the internal man is subordinate thereto. This is the case when the external man supplies reasonings which favor evil lusts. These men are called natural, and they who abide in things most external are called sensuous; from which it can be seen what is meant by “the sensuous.”

AC (Potts) n. 9731 sRef Ex@27 @5 S0′ 9731. And the net shall be even unto the middle of the altar. That this signifies the extension of the sensuous, is evident from the signification of “the net,” as being the sensuous (of which above, n. 9726); its extension is signified by its being “unto the middle of the altar.” The secret which this extension involves cannot be described to the apprehension unless it is known that this sensuous which is signified by “the grating, a network,” extends with man from the head down to the loins, and there ceases. It is this extension that was represented by the extension of the net even to the middle of the altar; for the representatives which are in nature bear relation to the human form, and have a signification in accordance with their relation to this form (n. 9496). But from the loins there is continued with man the sensuous which is the next inward, and which was represented by the general overlaying or covering of brass about the altar (of which above, n. 9722).

AC (Potts) n. 9732 sRef Ex@27 @6 S0′ 9732. And thou shalt make staves for the altar. That this signifies the power of keeping in a state of good, is evident from the signification of “staves,” as being power (see n. 9496). That they denote the power to keep in a state of good, is because the staves belonged to the altar, and by the altar was represented the Lord and the worship of Him from the good of love.

AC (Potts) n. 9733 sRef Ex@27 @6 S0′ 9733. Staves of shittim wood. That this signifies the good of righteousness and the consequent power, is evident from the signification of “staves,” as being power (see n. 9732); and from the signification of “shittim wood,” as being the good of merit, that is, the good of righteousness (n. 9472, 9486). That this good is the good of love of the Lord’s Divine Human, see n. 9715.

AC (Potts) n. 9734 sRef Ex@27 @6 S0′ 9734. And thou shalt overlay them with brass, signifies what is representative of good (as above, n. 9722).

AC (Potts) n. 9735 sRef Ex@27 @7 S0′ 9735. And the staves thereof shall be put into the rings. That this signifies the power of the sphere of Divine good, is evident from the signification of “staves,” as being power (see n. 9732); and from the signification of “the rings,” as being the sphere of Divine good and truth through which there is conjunction (of which also above, n. 9728).

AC (Potts) n. 9736 sRef Ex@27 @7 S0′ 9736. And the staves shall be upon the two sides of the altar. That this signifies the power of good from which is truth, and of truth from good, is evident from the signification of “the staves,” as being power (as just above); and from the signification of “the two sides,” as being the good from which is truth, and truth from good; thus the marriage of good with truth and of truth with good. The reason of this is that the things which are on the right side in man bear relation to the good from which is truth, and the things which are on the left side bear relation to truth from good (see n. 9604); and that by the conjunction of these is therefore signified the marriage of good and truth (n. 9495). Wherefore the same things are signified by the sides of the altar, where were the staves; for all the representatives in nature bear relation to the human form, and have a signification according to their relation to this form (n. 9496).

AC (Potts) n. 9737 sRef Isa@46 @3 S0′ sRef Isa@46 @4 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @7 S0′ 9737. In carrying it. That this signifies coming-forth and subsistence, is evident from the signification of “to carry,” as being to keep in a state of good and of truth, thus to come forth and subsist (see n. 9500). The same is signified by “carrying” in Isaiah:
Attend unto Me, O house of Jacob, and all the remains of the house of Israel, which I have carried from the womb; and even to old age, I am the same, and even to hoar hairs will I carry you; I have made, and I will carry, and I will bear (Isa. 46:3, 4);
where “to make” denotes that it may come-forth; “to carry,” that it may subsist; and “to bear,” that it may come-forth perpetually.

AC (Potts) n. 9738 sRef Ex@27 @8 S0′ 9738. Hollow of boards shalt thou make it. That this signifies application, is evident from the signification of “hollow of boards,” when said of the altar on which the burnt-offerings were to be burned and the fat things of the sacrifices were to be offered, as being application; for the altar was thereby rendered applicable to this use. Consequently there is also signified application in respect to those things which belong to the worship of the Lord from the good of love, which were represented by the altar, and by the burnt-offerings and sacrifices upon it (see n. 9714).

AC (Potts) n. 9739 sRef Ex@27 @8 S0′ 9739. As thou wast made to see in the mountain, so shall they make it. That this signifies from the correspondence of Divine things in heaven, is evident from the signification of “the altar seen in the mountain,” as being a form that corresponds to Divine things in heaven; for “Mount Sinai” denotes heaven (see n. 8805, 9420); and the forms which appear in the heavens correspond exactly to the Divine celestial and Divine spiritual things themselves which belong to good and truth. That these things are thus rendered visible before the internal sight of angels and spirits, can be seen from all those things which have been already stated and shown about the representation of heavenly things in natural forms (n. 1619, 1971, 1980, 1981, 2987-3003, 3213-3227, 3475, 3485, 6319, 9457, 9481, 9574, 9576, 9577). The Divine things to which the altar corresponded are those which have been thus far described.

AC (Potts) n. 9740 sRef Ex@27 @15 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @12 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @10 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @14 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @13 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @9 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @11 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @16 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @19 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @17 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @18 S0′ 9740. Verses 9-19. And thou shalt make the court of the Habitation at the corner of the south southward; the hangings for the court shall be of fine twined linen, a hundred cubits the length at the one corner; and the pillars thereof shall be twenty, and their bases twenty, of brass; the hooks of the pillars and their fillets shall be of silver. And so at the corner of the north in length, there shall be hangings a hundred cubits in length, and the pillars thereof twenty, and their bases twenty, of brass; the hooks of the pillars and their fillets of silver. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the sea shall be hangings of fifty cubits; the pillars thereof ten, and their bases ten. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the east eastward shall be fifty cubits. And the hangings for the one wing shall be fifteen cubits; the pillars thereof three, and their bases three. And for the other wing shall be hangings of fifteen cubits; the pillars thereof three, and their bases three. And for the gate of the court a covering of twenty cubits, of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double dyed, and fine twined linen, the work of the embroiderer; its pillars four, and their bases four. All the pillars of the court round about shall be filleted with fillets of silver; their hooks of silver, and their bases of brass. The length of the court shall be a hundred cubits, and the breadth fifty by fifty; and the height five cubits, of fine twined linen, and their bases of brass. And as for all the vessels of the Habitation in all the service thereof, all the pegs thereof, and all the pegs of the court, shall be of brass. “And thou shalt make the court of the Habitation,” signifies the ultimate heaven; “at the corner of the south southward,” signifies that is in the light of truth; “the hangings for the court,” signifies the truths of this heaven; “shall be of fine twined linen,” signifies from the understanding; “a hundred cubits the length,” signifies full of good from the Lord; “at the one corner,” signifies where truths are in light; “and the pillars thereof shall be twenty,” signifies the goods of truth fully supporting; “and their bases twenty, of brass,” signifies truths from good also fully supporting; “the hooks of the pillars and their fillets shall be of silver,” signifies the methods of conjunction by means of truth; “and so at the corner of the north in length,” signifies where the good of truth is in obscurity; “there shall be hangings a hundred cubits in length,” signifies also full of truths from good; “and the pillars thereof twenty,” signifies the goods of truth fully supporting; “and their bases twenty, of brass,” signifies truths from good also fully supporting; “the hooks of the pillars and their fillets of silver,” signifies the methods of conjunction by means of truth; “and the breadth of the court at the corner of the sea,” signifies the state of this heaven in respect to memory-truths; “shall be hangings of fifty cubits,” signifies truths sufficient for uses; “the pillars thereof ten, and their bases ten,” signifies the supporting goods and derivative truths also sufficient for uses; “and the breadth of the court at the corner of the east eastward,” signifies the state of truth of this heaven, where goods are; “shall be fifty cubits,” signifies sufficient for uses; “and the hangings for the one wing shall be fifteen cubits,” signifies truths in light, as many as are sufficient; “the pillars thereof three, and their bases three,” signifies goods and the derivative truths fully supporting; “and for the other wing shall be hangings of fifteen cubits, the pillars thereof three, and their bases three,” signifies similar things where truths are in obscurity; “and for the gate of the court a covering,” signifies introduction into this heaven, and a guard lest it should be entered by any except those who are prepared; “of twenty cubits,” signifies to the full; “of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen,” signifies the goods of charity and of faith; “the work of the embroiderer,” signifies which are in memory-knowledge; “its pillars four, and their bases four,” signifies goods and the derivative truths supporting the conjunction; “all the pillars of the court round about,” signifies all the good that supports heaven; “shall be filleted with fillets of silver, and their hooks of silver,” signifies all the methods of conjunction by means of truth; “and their bases of brass,” signifies the supports by means of good; “the length of the court shall be a hundred cubits,” signifies the good of this heaven to the full; “and the breadth fifty by fifty,” signifies truth as much as is sufficient; and the height five cubits,” signifies the degrees of good and truth, also as much as is sufficient; “of fine twined linen,” signifies from the understanding; “and their bases of brass,” signifies the support of all things by means of good; “and as for all the vessels of the habitation in all the service thereof,” signifies the memory-truths and goods that belong to the external man; “all the pegs thereof, and all the pegs of the court, shall be of brass,” signifies all things conjoining and strengthening each heaven, the middle and the ultimate, by means of good.

AC (Potts) n. 9741 sRef Ex@27 @9 S0′ 9741. And thou shalt make the court of the Habitation. That this signifies the ultimate heaven is evident from the signification of “the court of the Habitation” as being the external of heaven, thus the ultimate heaven. For there are three heavens-the inmost, the middle, and the ultimate; the inmost heaven was represented by the inmost part of the habitation, where was the ark of the Testimony; the middle heaven, by the Habitation outside the veil; and the ultimate heaven by the court, which is now treated of. This heaven is called “the court” because in it are those who are in the good of faith, and not yet in the good of charity toward the neighbor; those who are in the good of charity are in the middle heaven. Those who are in the ultimate heaven, which is called “the court,” are called “angelic spirits;” those who are in the middle heaven are called “spiritual angels;” but those who are in the inmost heaven are called “celestial angels.”
[2] Moreover, the very good of faith, which is the good of the ultimate heaven, is a court, for through it man is introduced into the good of charity toward the neighbor, which is the good of the middle heaven. Be it known that the good with a man makes his heaven, and that his heaven is such as his good is. There are three goods which follow in order: the good of faith, the good of charity toward the neighbor, and the good of love to the Lord. The good of faith, as just said, makes the ultimate or first heaven; the good of charity toward the neighbor makes the middle or second heaven; and the good of love to the Lord makes the inmost or third heaven.
[3] A few words shall be said in order to make known still better how the case is with the heavens. The heavens are distinguished into two kingdoms: the celestial kingdom, and the spiritual kingdom; and in each of these kingdoms there is an internal and an external. In the internal of the celestial kingdom are those who are in the good of love to the Lord, and in its external are those who are in the good of mutual love; but in the internal of the spiritual kingdom are those who are in the good of charity toward the neighbor, and in its external are those who are in the good of faith (see n. 9680). The external of both kingdoms is what is called the ultimate or first heaven, and was represented by the court. It was for this reason that the court around the temple was twofold, outer and inner; the outer court denotes those who are in the external things of the spiritual kingdom, and the inner court those who are in the external things of the celestial kingdom.
[4] With respect to these two courts of the temple at Jerusalem, see 1 Kings 6:3, 36; 2 Kings 21:5. With respect to the outer court of the new temple in Ezekiel, see Ezek. 40:17, 31, 34; 42:1-20; and with respect to the inner court there, Ezek. 40:23, 28, 32, 44; 42:3; 43:5. From this it is evident that it is the good of faith which makes the ultimate heaven that was represented by the outer court of the temple, and that it is the good of mutual love which makes the ultimate heaven that was represented by the inner court. Those who are in the good of mutual love are in the affection of good for the sake of good; but those who are in the good of faith are in the affection of truth for the sake of truth; for good rules in the celestial kingdom, but truth in the spiritual kingdom.
sRef Ezek@10 @5 S5′ sRef Ezek@10 @3 S5′ sRef Ezek@10 @4 S5′ [5] That the ultimate heaven is signified by “the courts,” is evident from the passages in the Word where these are mentioned; as in Ezekiel:
The glory of Jehovah lifted up itself above the cherub, over the threshold of the house; and the house was filled with the cloud, and the cloud filled the inner court, and the court was full of the brightness of the glory of Jehovah. And the voice of the wings of the cherubs was heard even to the outer court (Ezek. 10:3-5).
As the court was the representative of the ultimate heaven, therefore it was filled with the cloud and the brightness of the glory of Jehovah, as was the house itself; for “the cloud” and “the glory” denote Divine truth (that a “cloud” denotes this, see n. 5922, 6343, 6752, 8106, 8443; and also “glory,” n. 8267, 8427, 9429); “the voice of the wings” denotes the truth of faith from good (n. 8764, 9514).
sRef Ezek@43 @7 S6′ sRef Ezek@43 @4 S6′ sRef Ezek@43 @6 S6′ sRef Ezek@43 @5 S6′ [6] Again:
The spirit took me up, and brought me into the inner court of the temple, when behold the glory of Jehovah filled the house. And I heard one speaking unto me out of the house, saying, Son of man, this is the place of My throne, and the place of the soles of My feet, where I will dwell in the midst of the sons of Israel forever (Ezek. 43:5-7);
here the temple together with the court is called “the place of the throne of Jehovah, and the place of the soles of His feet,” because the temple together with the court represented heaven; “the throne of Jehovah” denotes the spiritual heaven (n. 5313, 8625), and “the place of the soles of His feet” denotes the ultimate heaven.
sRef Ps@65 @4 S7′ sRef Ps@96 @8 S7′ sRef Ps@135 @2 S7′ sRef Ps@135 @1 S7′ sRef Ps@84 @10 S7′ sRef Isa@62 @9 S7′ [7] The ultimate heaven is also signified by “the court,” and by “courts,” in the following passages. In David:
Blessed is he whom Thou choosest, and causest to approach; he shall dwell in Thy courts; we shall be sated with the good of Thy house, with the holy of Thy temple (Ps. 65:4);
it is evident that to “dwell in the courts” denotes to dwell in heaven. Again:
A day in Thy courts is better than thousands. I have chosen to stand at the door in the house of my God (Ps. 84:10).
Give unto Jehovah the glory of His name; bring an offering, and come into His courts (Ps. 96:8).
Praise ye the name of Jehovah; praise ye, O servants of Jehovah, who stand in the house of Jehovah, in the courts of the house of our God (Ps. 135:1, 2).
They shall gather the grain and the new wine; they shall eat it, and praise Jehovah, and they that shall gather it shall drink it in the courts of My holiness (Isa. 62:9).
In these passages “the courts” denote the ultimate heavens, for the interior heavens are called “the house of Jehovah” and “His temple” (n. 3720).
sRef Rev@11 @1 S8′ sRef Rev@11 @2 S8′ [8] In John:
The angel said, Arise and measure the temple of God, and the altar, and them that worship therein. But the court which is without the temple cast out, and measure it not; because it hath been given unto the Gentiles; and the holy city shall they tread under foot forty and two months (Rev. 11:1, 2);
“the temple, and the altar, and they that worship therein” denote the church and the worship of the church; “the court without the temple” denotes the good of mutual love (as before said); “the Gentiles, to whom it has been given to tread under foot the holy city,” denote the evils of self-love and of the love of the world, which destroy the church (n. 6306); “forty and two months” signify the like as six weeks, and six weeks the like as the six days of one week, for six multiplied by seven makes forty-two; “a week” signifies an entire period, greater or less (n. 2044, 3845); “the six days which precede the seventh,” which is the Sabbath, signify the former church even to the end, and the setting up of a new church; “the Sabbath” denotes the conjunction of good and truth, thus the church (n. 8495, 8510, 8889, 8893, 9274).

AC (Potts) n. 9742 sRef Ex@27 @9 S0′ 9742. At the corner of the south southward. That this signifies that it is in the light of truth, is evident from the signification of “the south southward,” as being where truth is in light (see n. 9642). That the court was on this side, was because those who are in the court of heaven, that is, who are in the ultimate heaven, are in the good of faith, and the good of faith arises by illumination from the light which is from the Lord. The light which is from the Lord is the truth of faith, and when this becomes of the will, it is called the good of faith. With those who are in the outer court, a new will is formed in the understanding (n. 9596), for the formation of which it is necessary that they be in the light of truth. From this it is that the court was made “southward” relatively to the Habitation.

AC (Potts) n. 9743 sRef Ex@27 @9 S0′ 9743. The hangings for the court. That this signifies the truths of this heaven, is evident from the signification of “curtains,” as being truths (see n. 9595, 9596), thus also “hangings;” and from the signification of “the court,” as being the ultimate heaven (of which above, n. 9741).

AC (Potts) n. 9744 sRef Ex@27 @9 S0′ 9744. Shall be of fine twined linen. That this signifies from the understanding, is evident from the signification of “fine linen,” as being truth from a celestial origin (see n. 5319, 9469); whence “fine twined linen” denotes the understanding, because this consists and is as it were twined, or woven, of truths from a celestial origin. For there are two things to which all things in the universe bear relation, namely, truth and good; and therefore man has two faculties, one appointed for the reception of truth, and the other for the reception of good; the faculty appointed for the reception of truth is called the understanding, and the faculty appointed for the reception of good is called the will. Insofar therefore as the understanding has been formed from genuine truths, so far it excels, and so far it is “fine twined linen,” for “fine linen” denotes truth from the Divine (n. 5319; that from this the “fine twined linen” denotes the understanding, see also n. 9596).

AC (Potts) n. 9745 sRef Ex@27 @9 S0′ 9745. A hundred cubits the length. That this signifies full of good from the Lord, is evident from the signification of “a hundred,” as being all, much, and what is full (of which in what follows); and from the signification of “length,” as being good (see n. 1613, 9487). That it denotes good from the Lord, is because the good of faith, in which are those who are in the ultimate heaven, which is represented by the court of the Habitation, is from the Lord. That “a hundred” denotes all, much, and what is full, is because “a hundred” has the same signification as “ten,” “a thousand,” and “ten thousand” (that by these numbers such things are signified, see n. 2575, 3107, 4638, 8715; and that the same is signified by “a hundred,” n. 2636, 4400).

AC (Potts) n. 9746 sRef Ex@27 @9 S0′ 9746. At the one corner. That this signifies where truth is in light, is evident from the signification of “the corner of the south southward,” which is here “the one corner,” as being where truth is in light (of which above, n. 9742).

AC (Potts) n. 9747 9747. And the pillars thereof shall be twenty. That this signifies the goods of truth fully supporting, is evident from the signification of “the pillars,” as being the goods of heaven and of the church which support (see n. 9674), here the goods of truth, because they are said of the ultimate heaven which is supported by the good of faith, which is the same as the good of truth; and from the signification of “twenty,” as being fully (n. 9641).

AC (Potts) n. 9748 9748. And their bases twenty, of brass. That this signifies truths from good also fully supporting, is evident from the signification of “the bases,” as being truths of faith from good (see n. 9643); from the signification of “twenty,” as being fully (as just above, n. 9747); and from the signification of “brass,” as being good (n. 425, 1551).

AC (Potts) n. 9749 9749. The hooks of the pillars and their fillets shall be of silver. That this signifies the methods of conjunction by means of truth, is evident from the signification of “hooks,” and “fillets,” as being methods of conjunction (that “hooks” have this signification see above, n. 9676; and that “fillets” have the same, is by their application); and from the signification of “silver,” as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658, 6112, 6914, 6917, 7999).

AC (Potts) n. 9750 sRef Ex@27 @11 S0′ 9750. And so at the corner of the north in length. That this signifies where the good of truth is in obscurity, is evident from the signification of “the corner of the north,” as being where truth is in obscurity; and from the signification of “length,” as being good (see n. 1613, 9487).

AC (Potts) n. 9751 sRef Ex@27 @11 S0′ 9751. There shall be hangings a hundred cubits in length. That this signifies also full of truth from good, is evident from the signification of “the hangings of the court,” as being the truths of the ultimate heaven (see above, n. 9743); from the signification of “a hundred,” as being what is full (see n. 9745); and from the signification of “length,” as being good (n. 1613, 9487).

AC (Potts) n. 9752 sRef Ex@27 @11 S0′ 9752. And the pillars thereof twenty, signifies the goods of truth fully supporting (as above, n. 9747).

AC (Potts) n. 9753 sRef Ex@27 @11 S0′ 9753. And their bases twenty, of brass, signifies truths from good also fully supporting (as also above, n. 9748).

AC (Potts) n. 9754 sRef Ex@27 @11 S0′ 9754. The hooks of the pillars and their fillets of silver, signifies the methods of conjunction by means of truth (as also above, n. 9749).

AC (Potts) n. 9755 sRef Ex@27 @12 S0′ 9755. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the sea. That this signifies the state of this heaven in respect to memory-truths, is evident from the signification of “breadth,” as being truth (see n. 1613, 3433, 3434, 4482, 9487); from the signification of “the court,” as being the ultimate heaven (see above, n. 9741); and from the signification of “the sea,” as being where there is a collection of memory-knowledges, from which there is reasoning about truths, thus also the natural and the sensuous, because these are what contain them. Here by “the corner of the sea” is meant the west corner, and by “the west” is signified good in obscurity. But when the west is not called “the west,” but “the sea,” then memory-knowledge is signified, which also is relatively in obscurity, because memory-knowledge belongs to the natural or external man; and the natural or external man is in the light of the world, which light relatively to the light of heaven, in which is the internal man, is like the shade when the sun is setting.
[2] This can also be seen from the things which appear in the other life. The Sun of heaven, which is the Lord, appears at a middle altitude toward the right eye; from this the angels of the heavens have all light, and with the light all intelligence and wisdom. But when the sun of the world is thought of, it does not appear; but in its stead there appears something dark which is in the opposite direction, at the back. There also is the west to the heavens, for the Lord as a Sun is the east in heaven. From this it can be seen that by “the west” is signified good in obscurity, and that the external or natural man is in this good, who as before said is in the light of the world, which light relatively to the light of heaven is like the shade when the sun is setting. But the truth of the natural man is signified by “the water of the sea,” and this truth is memory-knowledge; for the truth in the natural or external man is truth in knowledge; whereas the truth in the spiritual or internal man is the truth of faith. Truth in knowledge also becomes truth in faith when it is raised out of the natural or external man into the spiritual or internal man. Hence the truths with a man in his youth are truths in knowledge; but in adult age, if he suffers himself to be regenerated, they become truths in faith; for the internal man is successively opened even to this age.
sRef Ps@24 @1 S3′ sRef Ps@24 @2 S3′ [3] That “the sea” denotes a collection of memory-knowledges, comes from the fact that “waters,” “springs,” and “rivers,” signify truths, and therefore collections of these are signified by “seas.” That this is so, is also evident from passages in the Word where mention is made of “the sea” and of “seas;” as in David:
The earth is Jehovah’s, and the fullness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein. He hath founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the streams (Ps. 24:1, 2);
where “the earth” and “the world” denote the church; “the seas upon which He hath founded the world,” denote memory-truths; “the streams upon which He hath established it,” denote the truth of faith. That the earth, the world, seas, and rivers are not meant here, is evident, for the world is not founded upon the seas, nor is it established upon the streams.
sRef Ps@74 @14 S4′ sRef Ps@74 @15 S4′ sRef Ps@74 @13 S4′ sRef Hab@3 @15 S4′ [4] Again:
Thou didst break through the sea by Thy strength; Thou hast broken the heads of the whales upon the waters. Thou hast broken the heads of Leviathan, Thou gavest him for meat to the people Ziim, Thou hast dried up the rivers of strength (Ps. 74:13-15);
in the internal sense, the subject here treated of is the memory-knowledges that destroy the truths of faith; “the whales whose heads are broken,” denote memory-knowledges in general (n. 42, 7293); in like manner “Leviathan” (n. 7293); “the people Ziim to whom he was to be given for meat,” denote those who are in falsities, or the falsities themselves. From this it is evident what is denoted by “the sea,” namely, memory-knowledge misapplied to weaken and destroy truths. In Habakkuk:
Thou didst tread the sea with Thy horses, the mire of many waters (Hab. 3:15);
where “treading the sea with horses,” when spoken of Jehovah, denotes to instruct the natural man who has memory-knowledges.
sRef Hos@11 @10 S5′ sRef Hos@11 @11 S5′ sRef Zech@14 @8 S5′ [5] In Zechariah:
In that day, living waters shall go out from Jerusalem; part of them toward the eastern sea, and part of them toward the hinder sea (Zech. 14:8);
“living waters from Jerusalem” denote truths of faith made living from the good of love; “the eastern sea and the hinder sea” denote the natural and sensuous in which are memory-knowledges, which are collections of truths. In Hosea:
They shall walk after Jehovah, and the sons shall come with honor from the sea. They shall come with honor as a bird out of Egypt (Hos. 11:10, 11)
“sons from the sea” denote the memory-truths that belong to the natural man; for this reason it is said that “they shall come as a bird out of Egypt,” for “Egypt” in the Word denotes memory-knowledge (n. 9340, 9391).
sRef Ezek@26 @17 S6′ sRef Ezek@26 @16 S6′ [6] In Ezekiel:
All the princes of the sea shall come down from upon their thrones, and shall cast away their mantles, and put off the garments of their embroidery; they shall be clothed with terrors; they shall say, How hast thou perished that wast inhabited in the seas, the renowned city, that wast strong in the sea (Ezek. 26:16, 17);
where the subject treated of is the vastation of the knowledges of good and truth, which are “Tyre” (n. 1201); the knowledges of good and truth are the memory-knowledges of the church; “the princes of the sea” denote the primary knowledges (n. 1482, 2089, 5044); “to cast away the mantles and garments of embroidery” denotes to cast away memory-truths (n. 9688). As these things are signified by “Tyre,” therefore Tyre is said to be “inhabited in the seas, and to be a city strong on the sea.”
sRef Jer@51 @42 S7′ sRef Jer@51 @43 S7′ [7] In Jeremiah:
The sea is come up upon Babylon; she is covered with the multitude of the waves thereof. Her cities have been brought into desolation (Jer. 51:42, 43);
“Babylon” denotes worship which in externals appears holy, but in internals is profane (n. 1182, 1326); “the sea upon Babylon” denotes falsity from memory-knowledges; its “waves” denote reasonings therefrom, and the consequent denials; “the cities which are brought into desolation” denote doctrinal things.
sRef Rev@18 @19 S8′ sRef Rev@18 @17 S8′ sRef Rev@18 @18 S8′ sRef Rev@18 @21 S8′ [8] In like manner in Revelation:
Every pilot, and everyone who is employed upon the seas, and mariners, and all they who trade upon the sea, stood afar off, when they saw the smoke of the burning of Babylon, saying, Woe, woe, the great city, wherein were made rich all that have ships in the sea by reason of her costliness! Then an angel took up a stone as it were a great millstone, and cast it into the sea, saying, Thus with violence shall Babylon be cast down (Rev. 18:17-21).
“ships” denote doctrinal things from the Word (see n. 6385); hence it is plain what is meant by a “pilot,” and a “mariner,” also by “the sea,” and “those who trade upon it;” “a stone as it were a millstone,” denotes the truth through which is faith; “being cast into the sea,” denotes into the falsity of memory-knowledges. In the other life there appear seas, and also ships upon them; as has often been granted me to see. The seas there in a bad sense signify the falsities of memory-knowledges, and those who are in the ships signify those who boast of having such things, and teach them.
sRef Jer@31 @35 S9′ [9] In Jeremiah:
Thus said Jehovah, that giveth the sun for a light by day, the statutes of the moon and of the stars for a light by night, who throweth into commotion the sea, that the waves thereof are tumultuous (Jer. 31:35);
“the sun for a light by day” denotes the good of love from which comes the light in truths; “the statutes of the moon and of the stars for a light by night” denote the goods of faith and of knowledges, from which comes the light of truth in the dark; “to throw the sea into commotion that the waves thereof are tumultuous,” denotes to dispel the falsities of memory-knowledges from which come reasonings about truth.
sRef Isa@50 @2 S10′ [10] In Isaiah:
By shortening is My hand shortened, that there is no redemption? Or is there no power in Me to rescue? Behold by My rebuke I dry up the sea, I make the rivers a wilderness; their fish shall rot, because there Is no water, and it dieth of thirst (Isa. 50:2);
“to dry up the sea” denotes to destroy the good and truth of memory-knowledges; “to make the rivers a wilderness” denotes to vastate the truths themselves; “the fish which shall rot” denotes the memory-knowledge that belongs to the natural man (see n. 40, 991); “because there is no water” denotes that there is no truth (n. 2702, 3058, 3424, 4976, 5668, 8568).
sRef Isa@11 @9 S11′ sRef Isa@19 @6 S11′ sRef Isa@19 @5 S11′ [11] In like manner elsewhere in the same:
The waters shall fail from the sea, and the river shall be made quite dry and shall dry up. And the stream shall recede; the rivers of Egypt shall be diminished and dried up (Isa. 19:5, 6);
“the waters that shall fail from the sea” denote truths where there is a collection of them; “the rivers of Egypt which shall be dried up,” denote memory-knowledges. Again:
The earth is full of the knowledge of Jehovah, as the waters cover the sea (Isa. 11:9);
“the waters” denote truths; “the sea,” a collection of them, that is, of memory-knowledges; therefore it is said, “the earth is full of the knowledge of Jehovah.”
sRef Rev@8 @8 S12′ sRef Rev@8 @9 S12′ [12] In John:
The second angel sounded, and as it were a great mountain burning with fire was cast into the sea; and the third part of the sea became blood; whence there died the third part of the creatures that were in the sea having souls; and the third part of the ships was destroyed (Rev. 8:8, 9);
“a great mountain burning with fire” denotes the love of self; “the sea into which it was cast” denotes memory-knowledge in general; “the blood which was from it” denotes truth falsified and profaned (n. 4735, 6978, 7317, 7326); “the creatures which thereby died” denote those who are in the doctrinal things of truth.
sRef Rev@13 @1 S13′ sRef Rev@16 @3 S13′ sRef Rev@16 @4 S13′ [13] In like manner elsewhere in the same:
The second angel poured out his vial into the sea; and it became blood as of a dead man; whence every living soul in the sea died (Rev. 16:3);
here by “the sea” is meant memory-knowledge that is of service to evils to destroy truths, and to confirm falsities. Again:
A beast coming up out of the sea speaking blasphemies (Rev. 13:1, and following verses);
“a beast out of the sea” denotes memory-knowledge destroying the truths of faith. From all this it can be seen that “the sea” denotes where there is a collection of memory-knowledges, from which there is reasoning about the truths of faith.
sRef Gen@49 @19 S14′ sRef Deut@33 @19 S14′ [14] As “the sea” has this signification, it is said of Zebulun:
He shall dwell at the shore of the seas, and at a haven of ships (Gen. 49:13).
He shall suck the affluence of the sea, and the covered things of the hidden things of the sand (Deut. 33:19);
by “Zebulun” in the representative sense are meant those who draw conclusions from memory-knowledges about the truths of faith; wherefore it is said that “he should dwell at the shore of the seas.”
sRef Matt@18 @6 S15′ [15] But in the opposite sense “the sea” denotes memory-knowledge which looks to the world; its “waves” are in this case reasonings from worldly things about Divine ones; consequently “to be sunk in the sea” denotes to be immersed in memory-knowledges from worldly and earthly things even to the denial of truth Divine; as in Matthew:
Whoso shall cause to stumble one of these little ones that believe in Me, it is expedient for him that an ass millstone be hanged about his neck, and that he be sunk in the depth of the sea (Matt. 18:6);
“a millstone” denotes the truth that is of service to faith (n. 4335, 7780); “an ass” denotes the natural, because it is a beast of service (n. 2781, 5741, 5958, 6389, 8078); consequently “an ass millstone,”* denotes memory-knowledge that is natural and worldly; “the neck” denotes the conjunction of things interior and exterior (n. 3542); “being hanged there” denotes the shutting off and interception of good and truth (n. 3542, 3603); “being sunk in the depth of the sea” denotes in what is merely worldly and bodily, thus into hell. These things spoken by the Lord, like all other things spoken by Him, are therefore significative.
sRef Rev@21 @1 S16′ [16] But memory-knowledge is signified by “the sea” in accordance with the density and blackness of its waters; and on the other hand, in accordance with their tenuity and transparence. From this it is that the memory-knowledge which looks to heaven, which is spiritual in the natural man, is called “a glassy sea” (Rev. 15:1, 2). That there shall be no reasoning about the truths of faith from memory-knowledges; but that truths shall be impressed on the heart, is signified by, “the sea shall be no more” (Rev. 21:1).
* That is, a millstone turned by an ass. [REVISER.]

AC (Potts) n. 9756 sRef Ex@27 @12 S0′ 9756. Shall be hangings of fifty cubits. That this signifies truths sufficient for uses, is evident from the signification of “the hangings of the court,” as being truths such as are in the ultimate heaven (of which above, n. 9743); and from the signification of “fifty,” as being all things of one side, and likewise as much as is sufficient; for “fifty” signifies the like as “five,” and that “five” has this signification, see n. 9604, 9689; thus also sufficient for uses, for this is as much as is sufficient.

AC (Potts) n. 9757 sRef Ex@27 @12 S0′ 9757. The pillars thereof ten and their bases ten. That this signifies the supporting goods and derivative truths also sufficient for uses, is evident from the signification of “the pillars,” as being supporting goods (as above, n. 9747); from the signification of “the bases,” as being truths from good also supporting (n. 9748); and from the signification of “ten,” as being as much as is sufficient, that is, sufficient for uses. The case with the goods and truths which support is the same as with the truths themselves which are supported (n. 9747). “Ten” therefore here involves the like as “fifty,” or “five,” namely, sufficient for uses. Moreover, ten arises out of five by multiplication, being its double; and numbers multiplied have the like signification as the simple numbers (n. 5291, 5335, 5708, 7973).

AC (Potts) n. 9758 sRef Ex@27 @13 S0′ 9758. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the east eastward. That this signifies the state of truth of this heaven, where goods are, is evident from the signification of “breadth,” as being a state of truth (see n. 1613, 3433, 3434, 4482, 9487); from the signification of “the court,” as being the ultimate heaven (of which above, n. 9741); and from the signification of “the east” and “the sunrise,” as being the good of love (n. 1250, 3249, 3708).

AC (Potts) n. 9759 sRef Ex@27 @13 S0′ 9759. Shall be fifty cubits, signifies sufficient for uses (as above, n. 9756).

AC (Potts) n. 9760 sRef Ex@27 @14 S0′ 9760. And the hangings for the one wing shall be fifteen cubits. That this signifies truths in light, as many as are sufficient, is evident from the signification of “fifteen,” as being as much as is sufficient; from the signification of “the hangings,” as being truths (of which above, n. 9743); and from the signification of a “wing,” as being where truth is in light. That the “wing” has this signification is because by the “wing” is signified one side of the breadth of the court toward the corner of the east; for its breadth was fifty cubits, and in the middle of the breadth was the gate, the covering of which was twenty cubits (verse 16). The two sides, one to the right of the gate, and the other to the left, are called the “wings,” the hangings for each being fifteen cubits; therefore as before said the whole breadth was fifty cubits. It is plain therefore that one wing was toward the south, and the other toward the north. Consequently by “the hangings of the wing toward the south” are signified truths in light, for “the south” denotes where truth is in light (n. 9642); and by “the hangings of the wing toward the north” (of which in the following verse) are signified truths in obscurity, for “the north” denotes where truth is in obscurity (n. 3708).

AC (Potts) n. 9761 sRef Ex@27 @14 S0′ 9761. The pillars thereof three, and their bases three. That this signifies goods and the derivative truths fully supporting, is evident from the signification of “the pillars,” as being goods supporting (of which above, n. 9747, 9757); from the signification of “the bases,” as being truths from good likewise supporting (n. 9748); and from the signification of “three,” as being what is full (n. 2788, 4495, 7715).

AC (Potts) n. 9762 sRef Ex@27 @15 S0′ 9762. And for the other wing shall be hangings of fifteen cubits, the pillars thereof three, and their bases three. That this signifies similar things where truths are in obscurity, is evident, for they are the same words as those which were unfolded just above. And that by “the hangings of this wing” are signified truths in obscurity, see just above (n. 9760).

AC (Potts) n. 9763 sRef Ex@27 @16 S0′ 9763. And for the gate of the court a covering. That this signifies introduction into this heaven, and a guard lest it should be entered by any except those who are prepared, is evident from the signification of a “gate,” as being communication and introduction (see n. 8989); from the signification of “the court,” as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741); and from the signification of “the covering,” as being a guard lest it be entered; for the gate was guarded by the covering. That it denotes a guard lest it should be entered by any except those who are prepared, is because no one is introduced into heaven unless he is prepared. The case herein is this. Those who come from the world into the other life, which takes place immediately after their decease, bring with them worldly and earthly things which do not agree with the spiritual and celestial things in which the angels are; and therefore those who are to be raised into heaven are first prepared, which is effected by the separation of the worldly and earthly things which they have brought with them; for if they were taken up into heaven sooner, they could not possibly remain in the societies there, because they have a taste and love for grosser things than are suited to the purity in which the angels are. But after they have been prepared, they are taken up and introduced by the Lord into heaven, and are admitted into those angelic societies with which they are in agreement in respect to the truths and goods of faith and of love. From all this it can be seen what is meant by a guard lest heaven should be entered by any except those who are prepared.

AC (Potts) n. 9764 sRef Ex@27 @16 S0′ 9764. Of twenty cubits. That this signifies to the full is evident from the signification of “twenty,” as being what is full (see n. 9641).

AC (Potts) n. 9765 sRef Ex@27 @16 S0′ 9765. Of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen. That this signifies the goods of charity and of faith, is evident from what has been already shown (n. 9687), where the same words occur.

AC (Potts) n. 9766 sRef Ex@27 @16 S0′ 9766. The work of the embroiderer. That this signifies which belong to memory-knowledge, is evident from the signification of “the work of the embroiderer,” as being memory-knowledge (see n. 9688).

AC (Potts) n. 9767 sRef Ex@27 @16 S0′ 9767. Its pillars four, and their bases four. That this signifies goods and the derivative truths supporting the conjunction, is evident from the signification of “pillars and their bases,” as being goods and the derivative truths which support (see n. 9761); and from the signification of “four,” as being conjunction (n. 8877, 9601, 9674).

AC (Potts) n. 9768 sRef Ex@27 @17 S0′ 9768. All the pillars of the court round about. That this signifies all the good that supports heaven, is evident from the signification of “all the pillars round about,” as being all the good that supports (that “the pillars” denote goods supporting, see n. 9747, 9757); and from the signification of “the court,” as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741).

AC (Potts) n. 9769 sRef Ex@27 @17 S0′ 9769. Shall be filleted with fillets of silver, and their hooks shall be of silver. That this signifies all the methods of conjunction by means of truth, is evident from the signification of “fillets,” and of “hooks,” as being methods of conjunction (of which above, n. 9749); and from the signification of “silver,” as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658, 6112, 6914, 6917, 7999).

AC (Potts) n. 9770 sRef Ex@27 @17 S0′ 9770. And their bases of brass. That this signifies supports by means of good, is evident from the signification of “the bases,” as being supports (see n. 9643); and from the signification of “brass,” as being good (n. 425, 1551).

AC (Potts) n. 9771 sRef Ex@27 @18 S0′ 9771. The length of the court shall be a hundred cubits. That this signifies the good of this heaven to the full, is evident from the signification of “length,” as being good (see n. 1613, 9487); from the signification of “the court,” as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741); and from the signification of “a hundred,” as being to the full (of which above, n. 9745).

AC (Potts) n. 9772 sRef Ex@27 @18 S0′ 9772. And the breadth fifty by fifty. That this signifies truth as much as is sufficient, is evident from the signification of “breadth,” as being truth (see n. 1613, 3433, 3434, 4482, 9487); and from the signification of “fifty,” as being as much as is sufficient (n. 9756).

AC (Potts) n. 9773 sRef Ex@27 @18 S0′ 9773. And the height five cubits. That this signifies the degrees of good and truth also as much as is sufficient, is evident from the signification of “height,” as being degrees in respect to good (see n. 9489), and because this is predicated of the ultimate heaven, it denotes degrees also in respect to truth, for this heaven is in the good and truth of faith; and from the signification of “five,” as being as much as is sufficient (n. 9689). The reason why by “height” are signified degrees in respect to good and truth is that by “what is high” is signified what is internal (n. 1735, 2148, 4599); therefore the higher anything is, so much the more interior it is. In heaven that which is more interior is nearer to the Lord, for the Lord is in the inmost, and from the inmost all things proceed. Distances from the inmost are degrees of good and truth from Him. As the Lord is the inmost, He is also the Highest, for He is the Sun of heaven, from which is all height in the heavens. For this reason it is that the Lord is called in the Word “the Highest.”

AC (Potts) n. 9774 sRef Ex@27 @18 S0′ 9774. Of fine twined linen. That this signifies from the understanding, is evident from the signification of “fine twined linen,” as being what belongs to the understanding (see n. 9596, 9744).

AC (Potts) n. 9775 sRef Ex@27 @18 S0′ 9775. And their bases of brass, signifies the supports of all things by means of good (as above, n. 9770). That it denotes of all things, is because all the things of the court are treated of in this verse.

AC (Potts) n. 9776 sRef Ex@27 @19 S0′ 9776. And as for all the vessels of the Habitation in all the service thereof. That this signifies the memory-truths and goods that belong to the external man, is evident from the signification of “vessels,” as being memory-knowledges (see n. 3068, 3079, 9394, 9544); from the signification of “the Habitation,” as being heaven (n. 9594, 9596, 9632); and from the signification of “service,” as being the external or natural of man (n. 3019, 3020, 5305, 7998). That man’s external or natural is denoted by “service,” is because it ought to serve the internal or spiritual of man. For man has been created according to the image of heaven and the image of the world, the internal or spiritual man according to the image of heaven, and the external or natural man according to the image of the world (see n. 9279). Just as the world ought to serve heaven, so man’s external or natural ought to serve his internal or spiritual. Moreover, the natural was created for service; for it does not live from itself, thus can do nothing from itself; but from the internal or spiritual, that is, through this from the Lord. From this it is also evident that man’s external or natural is nothing unless it is of service to the internal or spiritual, and that it becomes something in proportion as it is of service. To be of service is to obey, and the natural obeys when it does not take for itself from the understanding reasons which favor the evils of the loves of self and of the world; but when it complies with the dictates of reason and the doctrine of the church, which declare that good and truth ought to be done, not for the sake of self and the world as ends, but for the sake of good and truth itself. In this manner the Lord does these through man’s heaven, that is, through his internal; for all good and truth are from the Lord, insomuch that good and truth with man are the Lord Himself. From all this it can be seen why it is that the external man must be a thing of service to the internal man.

AC (Potts) n. 9777 sRef Ex@27 @19 S0′ 9777. All the pegs thereof and all the pegs of the court, shall be of brass. That this signifies all things which conjoin and strengthen each heaven, the middle and the ultimate, by means of good, is evident from the signification of “the pegs,” as being things that conjoin and strengthen (of which in what follows); from the signification of “the Habitation,” which is here meant by “thereof,” as being heaven, specifically the middle heaven (see n. 9594, 9596, 9632); from the signification of “the court,” as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741); and from the signification of “brass,” as being external good (see n. 425, 1551).
sRef Isa@54 @2 S2′ [2] That, “pegs,” “stakes,” or “nails,” denote things which conjoin and strengthen, is because they do conjoin and strengthen. Similar things are also signified by them in the Word throughout; as in Isaiah:
Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations; forbid not; lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes (Isa. 54:2);
a new church from the Lord is here treated of; “enlarging the place of the tent, and stretching forth the curtains of the habitations,” denotes the doctrine of good and truth, and the consequent worship (n. 9596); “long cords,” and “stakes,” denote an ample connection and confirmation of truths. That the court also had its cords may be seen in Exodus 35:18; Numbers 3:37; 4:32.
sRef Isa@33 @20 S3′ [3] Again:
Look upon Zion; thine eyes shall see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a tabernacle that shall not be dispersed; the stakes thereof shall never be removed, neither shall any of the cords thereof be pulled away (Isa. 33:20);
where “stakes,” and “cords,” in like manner denote things which strengthen and conjoin. “Nails” also denote strengthening and conjunction in Isaiah 41:7, and in Jeremiah 10:4; but are there used in regard to idols, by which are signified doctrines of falsity, because from own intelligence (n. 8941, 9424). However, by “the nail” on which anything is hung, is signified affixing and adjoining, in Isaiah 22:23, 24, and in Ezekiel 15:3.

AC (Potts) n. 9778 sRef Ex@27 @20 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @21 S0′ 9778. Verses 20, 21. And thou shalt command the sons of Israel, and let them take unto thee olive oil pure, beaten, for the luminary, to cause the lamp to go up continually. In the Tent of meeting, without the veil which is over the Testimony, Aaron and his sons shall order it from evening until morning before Jehovah; a statute of an age for their generations with the sons of Israel. “And thou shalt command the sons of Israel,” signifies the church through the Word from the Lord; “and let them take unto thee olive oil,” signifies the good of charity and of faith; “pure, beaten,” signifies consequently genuine and clear; “for the luminary,” signifies the spiritual heaven; “to cause the lamp to go up continually,” signifies the consequent faith, and through faith intelligence of truth and wisdom of good from the Lord; “in the Tent of meeting,” signifies where is the presence of the Lord; “without the veil which is over the Testimony,” signifies where there is communication, and, through the uniting intermediate, conjunction with the Lord in the inmost heaven; “Aaron and his sons shall order it,” signifies perpetual influx from the Lord; “from evening until morning before Jehovah,” signifies continually in every state; “a statute of an age,” signifies Divine order; “for their generations with the sons of Israel,” signifies what is eternal in the spiritual kingdom.

AC (Potts) n. 9779 sRef Ex@27 @20 S0′ 9779. And thou shalt command the sons of Israel. That this signifies for the church through the Word from the Lord, is evident from the representation of Moses, who is meant by “thou,” as being the Lord in respect to the Word, or the Word which is from the Lord (see n. 4859, 5922, 6752, 7014, 7089, 9372); and from the representation of the sons of Israel, as being those of the spiritual church (n. 9340). From this it is plain that by “Moses commanding the sons of Israel” is signified that it was commanded for the church through the Word by the Lord.

AC (Potts) n. 9780 sRef Ex@27 @20 S0′ 9780. And let them take unto thee olive oil. That this signifies the good of charity and of faith, is evident from the signification of “olive oil,” as being the good of celestial love (see n. 886), but here the good of spiritual love, which is the good of charity toward the neighbor and the good of faith. That this good is here signified by “olive oil,” is because it was for the luminary, that is, for the lampstand, and by the “lampstand” is signified the spiritual heaven (n. 9548). The spiritual heaven on earth is the spiritual church. “Oil,” and “the olive-tree,” in the Word signify both celestial good and spiritual good; celestial good where the subject treated of is the celestial kingdom or the celestial church, and spiritual good where it is the spiritual kingdom or the spiritual church. These kingdoms or churches are distinguished by their goods. The goods of the celestial kingdom, or of the celestial church, are the good of love to the Lord and the good of mutual love; and the goods of the spiritual kingdom, or of the spiritual church, are the good of charity toward the neighbor and the good of faith (n. 9741). These goods and the truths therefrom are treated of in the Word throughout, for the Word is the doctrine of good, because it is the doctrine of love to the Lord and of love toward the neighbor (see Matt. 22:35-40); and all good is of love, even the good of faith, for this comes forth from the good of love, and not without it.
[2] As the Word is the doctrine of good, therefore in order that the Word may be understood, it must be known what good is; and no one knows what good is unless he lives in good according to the Word; for when anyone lives in good according to the Word, then the Lord instills good into his life, from which the man perceives it and feels it, and consequently apprehends the nature of it; otherwise it does not appear, because it is not perceived. From this it can be seen in what state they are who merely know what is in the Word, and persuade themselves that it is so, and yet do not do it. They have no knowledge of good, consequently none of truth; for truth is known from good, and never without good, except as memory-knowledge devoid of life, which perishes in the other life.
sRef Rev@11 @4 S3′ sRef Zech@4 @3 S3′ sRef Zech@4 @14 S3′ sRef Rev@11 @3 S3′ sRef Zech@4 @11 S3′ sRef Zech@4 @2 S3′ [3] That “oil” and also “the olive” denote good, is evident from the passages in the Word where they are mentioned, as in Zechariah:
I saw a lampstand of gold. Two olive-trees were beside it; one on the right side of the flask, and the other on the left side thereof. These are the two sons of oil that stand beside the Lord of the whole earth (Zech. 4:2, 3, 14);
where “the two olive-trees,” and “the two sons of oil,” denote the good of love to the Lord, which is on His right, and the good of charity toward the neighbor, which is on His left. In like manner in John:
The two witnesses prophesied a thousand two hundred and sixty days. These are the two olive-trees and the two lampstands that stand before the God of the earth (Rev 11:3, 4);
where “the two olive-trees and the two lampstands” denote these same goods, which, being from the Lord, are called “the two witnesses.”
sRef Joel@1 @10 S4′ sRef Jer@31 @12 S4′ sRef Joel@2 @24 S4′ sRef Isa@41 @19 S4′ sRef Rev@6 @6 S4′ [4] Again:
I heard a voice in the midst of the four living creatures, saying, Hurt not the oil and the wine (Rev. 6:6);
where “the oil” denotes the good of love and charity, and “the wine,” the good and truth of faith. Again:
I will set in the wilderness the cedar of Shittah, and the myrtle, and the wood of oil (Isa. 41:19).
They shall come and sing in the height of Zion, and shall flow together unto the good of Jehovah, to the wheat, and to the new wine, and to the oil (Jer. 31:12).
The field is wasted, the land mourneth; for the grain is wasted, the new wine is dried up, the oil languisheth (Joel 1:10).
The floors are full of pure grain, and the presses overflow with new wine and oil (Joel 2:24).
I will give the rain of your land in its season, that thou mayest gather in thy grain, thy new wine, and thine oil (Deut. 11:14).
sRef Deut@11 @14 S5′ [5] “Grain, new wine, and oil” are here spoken of, but that these things are not meant can be seen by everyone who considers; for the Word, being Divine, is spiritual, not worldly, and therefore it does not treat of the grain, the new wine, and the oil of the earth, insofar as these are of service to the body for foods, but insofar as they are of service to the soul; for all foods in the Word signify heavenly foods, as do the bread and the wine in the Holy Supper. What “the grain” and “the new wine” signify in the passages here quoted, may be seen above (n. 3580, 5295, 5410, 5959); from this it is evident what “the oil” signifies.
sRef Luke@10 @34 S6′ sRef Luke@10 @33 S6′ [6] The case is the same with all things spoken by the Lord while He was in the world, as when He said of the Samaritan that “he came to the man who was wounded by thieves, and bound up his wounds and poured in oil and wine” (Luke 10:33, 34). Here are not meant oil and wine, but the good of love and of charity, by “oil” the good of love, and by “wine” the good of charity and of faith; for the subject treated of, is the neighbor, thus charity toward him (that “wine” has this signification, see n. 6377).
sRef Matt@25 @4 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @3 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @8 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @5 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @6 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @13 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @11 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @10 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @9 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @12 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @7 S7′ [7] In like manner what the Lord said of the ten virgins, of whom “five took their lamps and no oil with them, and five took also oil,” and that the latter were admitted into heaven, but the former rejected (Matt. 25:3, 4, and following verses); “oil in the lamps” denotes the good of love and of charity in the truths of faith; “the virgins who took their lamps and no oil” denote those who hear the Word, read it, and say that they believe, and yet do no good in consequence, and if they do any good, it is not done from the love of good or of truth, but from the love of self and of the world.
sRef Mark@6 @13 S8′ sRef Ps@23 @5 S8′ sRef Deut@32 @13 S8′ [8] As “oil” signified the good of charity, therefore also the sick were anointed with oil and were healed, as we read of the Lord’s disciples, who “went forth and cast out demons, and anointed with oil them that were sick, and healed them” (Mark 6:13). And in David:
Thou wilt make fat my head with oil; my cup shall run over (Ps. 23:5);
where “to make fat the head with oil” denotes to endow with celestial good. In Moses:
Jehovah fed him with the produce of the fields; He made him to suck honey out of the rock, and oil out of the stone of the rock (Deut. 32:13);
speaking of the Ancient Church; where “sucking oil out of the stone of the rock” denotes to be imbued with good through the truths of faith.
sRef Hab@3 @17 S9′ [9] In Habakkuk:
The fig-tree shall not blossom, neither shall produce be in the vines; the labor of the olive shall lie, and the fields shall yield no food (Hab. 3:17);
here neither fig-tree, nor vine, nor olive, nor fields are meant, but heavenly things to which they correspond; as also everyone is able to acknowledge from himself who acknowledges that the Word treats of such things as belong to heaven and the church, thus as belong to the soul. But they who think of nothing but worldly, earthly, and bodily things, do not see the internal things, and even do not wish to see them, for they say within themselves, What are spiritual things? What are celestial things? and so, What is heavenly food? That these are such things as belong to intelligence and wisdom they indeed know when it is so said; but that they belong to faith and love, they do not desire; for the reason that they do not imbue their life with such things, and therefore do not attain to the intelligence and wisdom of heavenly truths and goodnesses.
sRef Ezek@16 @10 S10′ sRef Ezek@16 @9 S10′ sRef Ezek@16 @18 S10′ sRef Ezek@16 @13 S10′ [10] In Ezekiel:
I washed thee with waters, and I washed away thy bloods from upon thee, and I anointed thee with oil. I clothed thee with broidered work. Thy garments were fine linen, silk, and broidered work; thou didst eat fine flour, and honey, and oil. But thou didst take thy broidered garments, and coveredst images; and didst set Mine oil and Mine incense before them (Ezek. 16:9, 10, 13, 18).
Who cannot see that in this passage are not meant garments of broidered work, fine linen, and silk, nor oil, honey, or fine flour; but Divine things which are of heaven and the church; for the subject treated of is Jerusalem, by which is meant the church; and therefore by the several things mentioned are meant such things as are of the church. That by each particular is meant some special thing of the church, is evident; for in the Word, which is Divine, there is not a word that is worthless. (That “Jerusalem” denotes the church, see n. 3654; also what is meant by ” broidered work,” n. 9688; by “fine linen,” n. 5319, 9469; by “fine flour,” n. 2177; by “honey,” n. 5620, 6857; by “washing with waters,” n. 3147, 5954, 9088; and by “washing away bloods,” n. 4735, 9127.)
sRef Hos@12 @1 S11′ [11] In Hosea:
Ephraim feedeth on wind, they make a covenant with the Assyrian, and oil is carried down into Egypt (Hos. 12:1);
these things are quite unintelligible unless it is known what is meant by “Ephraim,” what by “the Assyrian,” and what by “Egypt;” yet there is here described the understanding of the man of the church, which is perverted through reasonings from memory-knowledges; for “Ephraim” denotes this understanding (n. 3969, 5354, 6222, 6238, 6267); “the Assyrian,” reasoning (n. 1186); and “Egypt,” memory-knowledge (n. 9391); consequently “to carry down oil into Egypt” denotes to defile in this way the good of the church.
sRef Zech@14 @4 S12′ sRef Zech@14 @3 S12′ [12] That the Lord so often went up the Mount of Olives (Luke 21:37; 22:39), was because “oil” and “the olive” signified the good of love, as also does a “mountain” (n. 6435, 8758). The reason was that while the Lord was in the world all things respecting Him were representative of heaven; for thereby the universal heaven was adjoined to Him; wherefore whatever He did and whatever He said was Divine and heavenly, and the ultimate things were representative. The Mount of Olives represented heaven in respect to the good of love and of charity; as also can be seen in Zechariah:
Jehovah shall go forth, and fight against the nations. His feet shall stand in that day upon the Mount of Olives, which is before the faces of Jerusalem, and the Mount of Olives shall be cleft asunder, that a part thereof shall recede toward the east, and toward the sea, with a great valley; and a part of the mountain shall recede toward the north, and a part of it toward the south (Zech. 14:3-4).
sRef Luke@13 @28 S13′ sRef Luke@13 @29 S13′ [13] Here the Lord and His coming are the subject treated of; by “the Mount of Olives” is signified the good of love and of charity; thus the church, for these goods make the church. That the church would recede from the Jewish nation, and would be set up among the Gentiles, is signified by “the mountain being cleft asunder toward the east, toward the sea, and toward the north, and the south;” in like manner as by the words of the Lord in Luke:
Ye shall be cast down outside; whereas they shall come from the east, and the west, and from the north, and the south, and shall sit down in the kingdom of God (Luke 13:28, 29).
In a universal sense by “Jehovah going forth and fighting against the nations,” and by “His feet standing upon the Mount of Olives which is before the faces of Jerusalem,” is meant that the Lord from Divine love would fight against the hells; for “the nations” denote evils which are from the hells (n. 1868, 6306), and “the Mount of Olives,” on which were His feet, denotes the Divine love.

AC (Potts) n. 9781 sRef Deut@9 @21 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @20 S0′ 9781. Pure, beaten. That this signifies genuine and clear, is evident from the signification of “pure,” when said of the good which is signified by “oil,” as being genuine; for the more celestial good is-thus the more genuine-so much the purer it is; and from the signification of “beaten,” when said of the good which is signified by “oil,” as being clear. Good is said to be clear when it becomes truth; for good appears by means of truth, because truth is the form of good; and good does not appear in light except in a form. The better therefore that good is presented in a form, the more clearly it appears, for the result is that good itself shines forth, even so as to affect both the understanding and at the same time the will of others. For as is the case with good and truth, so it is with the will and the understanding in man, because the will has been appointed for the reception of good, and the understanding for the reception of truth; and the will does not appear in light except through the understanding, for it is understanding which gives form to what is of the will, and presents it in clearness. That which is formed is as it were divided into parts, and among these parts, which are analytically associated together, there are established various regards or relations. In this manner good is presented to view in the understanding and is rendered clear. When good has been rendered clear in the understanding, it is the truth of this good. From this then it is that the oil was to be beaten, as also the frankincense, of which it is said that it shall be pure, and that some of it shall be beaten very small, and thus burned as incense (Exod. 30:34-36). The like that is signified by “beaten” is also signified by being “ground in a mill,” as can be seen from the signification of “wheat” and of “fine flour;” “wheat” signifying good, and “fine flour” its truth. Just as that which is beaten and ground signifies in the genuine sense good made clear, so what is beaten and ground, in the opposite sense signifies evil made clear. This is signified by Moses beating the golden calf, and grinding it very small; and when it was as fine as dust, casting it into the brook that descended from the mountain (Deut. 9:21; see n. 9391).

AC (Potts) n. 9782 sRef Ex@27 @20 S0′ 9782. For the luminary. That this signifies the spiritual heaven, is evident from the signification of “the luminary,” or “lampstand,” as being the spiritual heaven (see n. 9548).

AC (Potts) n. 9783 sRef Ex@27 @20 S0′ 9783. To cause the lamp to go up continually. That this signifies the consequent faith, and through faith the intelligence of truth and wisdom of good from the Lord, is evident from the signification of a “lamp,” as being faith and the consequent intelligence of truth and wisdom of good (see n. 9548). That a “lamp” denotes faith, is because the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord is light in the heavens; this light, when received by the angels who are there, or by man, is like a lamp, for it illuminates all things of the mind, and imparts intelligence and wisdom. This light when received is faith. But be it known that faith is not a lamp, that is, does not illuminate the mind, unless it is from charity; thus unless it is charity. The case with faith and charity is the same as with truth and good; truth is the form of good, that is, it is good so formed as to appear in light. So faith is the form of charity, or charity formed. Moreover, truth pertains to faith, and good to charity; for that which is true is believed, and becomes of faith; and that which is good is loved, and becomes of charity. The truth and good itself which are loved are the neighbor, and the love of these is charity.

AC (Potts) n. 9784 sRef Ex@29 @43 S0′ sRef Ex@29 @46 S0′ sRef Ex@29 @44 S0′ sRef Ex@29 @42 S0′ sRef Ex@29 @45 S0′ sRef Ex@40 @33 S0′ sRef Ex@40 @37 S0′ sRef Ex@40 @34 S0′ sRef Ex@40 @35 S0′ sRef Ex@40 @36 S0′ sRef Ex@40 @38 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @21 S0′ 9784. In the Tent of meeting. That this signifies where is the presence of the Lord, is evident from the fact that the Tent was made in order that the Lord might there meet Moses and Aaron, and also the sons of Israel. Therefore also what is holy of worship was instituted there, as can be seen from the following passages in Exodus:
They shall make a continual burnt-offering at the door of the Tent of meeting before Jehovah; where I will meet with you, to speak there with thee. And there I will meet with the sons of Israel; and it shall be sanctified by My glory. And I will sanctify the Tent of meeting, and the altar. Aaron also and his sons will I sanctify, that they may minister to Me in the priesthood. And I will dwell in the midst of the sons of Israel (Exod. 29:42-45).
And that the Lord met with them there, that is, that He was present there, can be seen from this passage:
When all things were finished, the cloud covered the Tent of meeting, and the glory of Jehovah filled the Habitation. And Moses could not enter into the Tent of meeting, because the cloud dwelt upon it, and the glory of Jehovah filled the Habitation. The cloud of Jehovah was upon the Habitation by day; and there was fire therein by night, in the eyes of all the house of Israel (Exod. 40:33, to the end).

From all this it can be seen that by “the Tent of meeting” is signified where the presence of the Lord is. The reason was that the Tent represented heaven, and heaven is heaven by virtue of the presence of the Lord in it, on which account also it was called “the Habitation of Jehovah.”

AC (Potts) n. 9785 sRef Ex@27 @21 S0′ 9785. Without the veil which is over the Testimony. That this signifies where there is communication, and, through the uniting intermediate, conjunction with the Lord in the inmost heaven, is evident from the signification of “the veil,” as being the intermediate that unites the inmost heaven and the middle heaven (see n. 9670, 9671), thus where there is communication and conjunction; and from the signification of “the Testimony,” as being the Lord in respect to Divine truth.

AC (Potts) n. 9786 sRef Ex@27 @21 S0′ 9786. Aaron and his sons shall order it. That this signifies perpetual influx from the Lord, is evident from the signification of “ordering,” when said of the Lord, who was represented by Aaron, as being influx; for all communication of Divine good and Divine truth from the Lord, and all conjunction with Him, are effected through influx. Angels and men are recipient forms. That perpetual influx is signified, is because the subject treated of is the ordering of the lamp from evening until morning, by which is signified continually and perpetually. That the influx is from the Lord, is because by Aaron was represented the Lord as to Divine good, and by his sons the Lord as to Divine truth (of which in what follows).

AC (Potts) n. 9787 sRef Ex@27 @21 S0′ 9787. From evening until morning before Jehovah. That this signifies continually in every state, is evident from the signification of “evening,” as being the end of one state (see n. 8426); and from the signification of “morning,” as being the beginning of another (n. 8427). That it denotes continually in every state, is because “evening” involves every state of shade which is signified by the following night; and “morning” involves every state of light which is signified by the following day; for with the Lord things following and future are together in the present, because everything which the Lord ordains, that is, provides with man and angel, is eternal. From this it can be seen that by the “ordering of the lamp from evening until morning” is signified the perpetual influx of good and of truth from the Lord continually in every state.

AC (Potts) n. 9788 sRef Ex@27 @21 S0′ 9788. It shall be a statute of an age. That this signifies the Divine order, is evident from the signification of “a statute,” as being Divine order (see n. 7884, 7995, 8357); and from the signification of “age,” as being what is eternal; moreover, what is Divine is eternal.

AC (Potts) n. 9789 sRef Ps@33 @11 S0′ sRef Isa@51 @8 S0′ sRef Ps@145 @4 S0′ sRef Ex@3 @15 S0′ sRef Isa@34 @10 S0′ sRef Isa@51 @9 S0′ sRef Ex@27 @21 S0′ sRef Ps@145 @3 S0′ sRef Isa@60 @15 S0′ sRef Ps@145 @2 S0′ 9789. For their generations with the sons of Israel. That this signifies what is eternal in the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the signification of “generations,” as being what is eternal (of which in what follows); and from the signification of “the sons of Israel,” as being the spiritual church (see n. 9340), and therefore the spiritual kingdom; for the spiritual kingdom of the Lord in the heavens is the spiritual heaven, and on earth it is the spiritual church. “Generations” denote what is eternal, because by them in the internal sense are meant the generations of faith and charity (n. 613, 2020, 2584, 6239, 9042, 9079), thus the things which are of heaven and the church, which are eternal. Moreover, by “the sons of Israel,” of whom the “generations” are predicated, is signified the church (n. 9340). That by “generations” is signified what is eternal, is plain from the following passages in the Word:
My righteousness shall be to eternity, and My salvation unto generations of generations. Awake as in the days of antiquities, the generations of eternities (Isa. 51:8, 9).
I will set thee for a magnificence of eternities, a joy of generation and generation (Isa. 60:15).
The smoke thereof shall go up to eternity; from generation to generation it shall be laid waste, none shall pass through it for everlasting of everlastings (Isa. 34:10).
The counsel of Jehovah shall stand to eternity, the thoughts of His heart to generation and generation (Ps. 33:11).
I will praise Thy name to eternity and forever, generation to generation shall praise Thy works (Ps. 145:2, 4).
They shall fear Thee with the sun, and before the moon, from generation of generations (Ps. 72:5).
This is My name to eternity, and this My memorial unto generation and generation (Exod. 3:15);
besides many other passages. It is said “to eternity,” and “to generation and generation,” and “eternity” is predicated of the Divine celestial, or good; and “generation,” of the Divine spiritual, or truth; for in the Word, especially in the prophetic Word, there are for the most part two expressions relating to one and the same thing, as in the passages above quoted, “to eternity,” and “to generation and generation;” and this on account of the heavenly marriage in each and all things of the Word. The heavenly marriage is the marriage of good and truth, or the conjunction of the Lord and heaven (see the passages cited in n. 9263).

AC (Potts) n. 9790 9790. CONTINUATION ABOUT THE FIRST EARTH SEEN IN THE STARRY HEAVENS.
It has also been granted me to see some of the in- habitants of a lower class. They were seen in a garment such as is worn by rustics in Europe. There was also seen a man with his wife. She appeared of handsome figure and becoming mien, as did likewise the man. But I was surprised at his grand style of walking, with steps as it were haughty, while on the other hand the woman walked with a lowly gait. The angels said that such is the custom on that earth, and that the men who are like this are loved, because they are nevertheless good. It was said further that they are not allowed to have more wives than one, because this is contrary to the laws.

AC (Potts) n. 9791 9791. A man who is in the spirit, when allowed to do so by the Lord, can look at what occurs in the earth to which he is near; for in the other life there is no space, thus no distance between those who are in a similar state (according to what was said above, n. 9579-9581). What I have just mentioned took place in the same way as with the spirits of some of the earths in our solar system, to whom it was given by the Lord to see through my eyes many things in our earth, as already stated in several places.

AC (Potts) n. 9792 9792. The woman who was seen had a wide garment in front of her bosom, behind which she could hide herself. It was so made that she could insert her arms, and clothe herself with it, and so go away. The lower part of it could be drawn up; and when drawn up and applied to the body, it appeared like a stomacher, such as is worn by the women of our earth. But the same garment served the man also for a covering, and he was seen to take it from the woman and apply it to his own back, loosening the lower part, which then flowed down to his feet like a gown, and in this manner he walked clad.

AC (Potts) n. 9793 9793. Afterward I spoke with spirits who were from that earth, and told them many things about our earth; as that there are sciences here which do not exist elsewhere, such as astronomy, geometry, mechanics, physics, chemistry, medicine, optics, and philosophy; besides arts which also are unknown elsewhere, as the art of ship-building, of casting metals, of writing on paper, and of printing what is written, and thus of communicating it to all in the whole earth, and of preserving it to posterity for thousands of years; and that it has been so done with the Word, which is from the Lord, and that therefore the revealed Word remains unchanged in this earth (see n. 9350-9360).

AC (Potts) n. 9794 9794. Lastly there was shown me the hell of those who are from that earth. Those who were seen from it excited the greatest terror. I would not venture to describe their monstrous faces. Sorceresses also were seen there who practice direful arts; they appeared clad in green, and excited horror.

AC (Potts) n. 9795 9795. The second earth that was seen in the starry heaven will be described at the end of the following chapter.

AC (Potts) n. 9796 9796. CHAPTER THE TWENTY-EIGHTH

THE DOCTRINE OF CHARITY AND FAITH

When it is known what the internal man is, and what the external man, the source of the Understanding of Truth, and of the Will of Good, can then be known.

AC (Potts) n. 9797 9797. In proportion as the internal man has been opened toward heaven, thus to the Lord, in the same proportion a man is in the light of heaven, thus in the same proportion he is in the understanding of truth. The light of heaven is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord; to be enlightened by this light is to understand truth.

AC (Potts) n. 9798 sRef Ps@72 @5 S0′ 9798. In proportion as the internal man has been opened to the Lord, and the external man subordinated to it, in the same proportion a man is in the fire of heaven; thus in the same proportion he is in the will of good. The fire of heaven is the Divine love that proceeds from the Lord; to be kindled by this fire is to will good.

AC (Potts) n. 9799 9799. Therefore the understanding of truth is to see truths from the Word by virtue of enlightenment from the Lord; and the will of good is to will these truths from affection.

AC (Potts) n. 9800 9800. They who are in love and faith in the Lord, and in charity toward the neighbor, are in the understanding of truth and in the will of good, for with them there is a reception of the good and truth which are from the Lord.

AC (Potts) n. 9801 9801. On the other hand, in proportion as the internal man has been closed toward heaven and to the Lord, in the same proportion a man is in cold and thick darkness in respect to the things of heaven. And then in proportion as the external man has been opened toward the world, in the same proportion the man thinks what is false, and wills what is evil, and thus is insane; for the light of the world extinguishes in him the light of heaven; and the fire of the life of the world extinguishes the fire of the life of heaven.

AC (Potts) n. 9802 9802. They who are in the love of self, and in the persuasion of self-derived intelligence and wisdom, are in such cold and thick darkness.

AC (Potts) n. 9803 sRef Matt@13 @13 S0′ sRef John@14 @17 S0′ 9803. From this it is evident that to be intelligent and wise does not consist in understanding and being wise about many things of the world; but in understanding and willing the things of heaven. For there are those who understand and are wise about many things of the world, and yet do not believe or will the things of heaven; thus are insane. These are they of whom the Lord says:
I speak by parables; because seeing they see not, and hearing they hear not, neither do they understand (Matt. 13:13).
The world cannot receive the Spirit of truth, because it seeth Him not, neither knoweth Him (John 14:17).

EXODUS 28

1. And thou shalt cause to draw near unto thee Aaron thy brother, and his sons with him, from the midst of the sons of Israel, that he may minister in the priest’s office to Me, Aaron, Nadab and Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar, Aaron’s sons.
2. And thou shalt make garments of holiness for Aaron thy brother, for glory and for comeliness.
3. And thou shalt speak unto all the wise in heart, whom I have filled with the spirit of wisdom, and they shall make Aaron’s garments to sanctify him, that he may minister to Me in the priest’s office.
4. And these are the garments which they shall make; a breastplate, and an ephod, and a robe, and a tunic of checker work, a miter, and a belt; and they shall make garments of holiness for Aaron thy brother, and for his sons, that he may minister to Me in the priest’s office.
5. And they shall take the gold, and the blue, and the crimson, and the scarlet double-dyed, and the fine linen.
6. And they shall make the ephod of gold, of blue and crimson, of scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen, with the work of a thinker.*
7. It shall have two shoulders joined at the two extremities thereof; and it shall be joined together.
8. And the girdle of his ephod, which is upon it, according to the work thereof, shall be from it; of gold, of blue and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen.
9. And thou shalt take two onyx stones, and engrave on them the names of the sons of Israel.
10. Six of their names on the one stone, and the names of the six that remain on the other stone, according to their generations.
11. With the work of a worker in stone, with the engravings of a signet, shalt thou engrave the two stones, according to the names of the sons of Israel; encompassed with settings of gold shalt thou make them.
12. And thou shalt put the two stones upon the shoulders of the ephod, to be stones of remembrance for the sons of Israel; and Aaron shall bear their names before Jehovah upon his two shoulders for a remembrance.
13. And thou shalt make settings of gold.
14. And two chains of pure gold; from their borders shalt thou make them, with cord-work; and thou shalt put the chains of cords on the settings.
15. And thou shalt make a breastplate of judgment, with the work of a thinker;* like the work of the ephod thou shalt make it; of gold, of blue and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen, shalt thou make it.
16. Foursquare it shall be, doubled; a span the length thereof, and a span the breadth thereof.
17. And thou shalt fill it with a filling of stone, four rows of stone; a row, a ruby, a topaz, and a carbuncle, row one;
18. And the second row, a chrysoprase, a sapphire, and a diamond;
19. And the third row, a cyanus, an agate, and an amethyst;
20. And the fourth row, a tarshish [beryl], and an onyx, and a jasper; they shall be enclosed in gold in their fillings.
21. And the stones shall be upon the names of the sons of Israel, twelve, upon their names; with the engravings of a signet, for everyone upon his name, they shall be for the twelve tribes.
22. And thou shalt make upon the breastplate chains of the border with cord-work, of pure gold.
23. And thou shalt make upon the breastplate two rings of gold, and shalt put the two rings on the two extremities of the breastplate.
24. And thou shalt put the two cords of gold on the two rings at the extremities of the breastplate.
25. And the two extremities of the two cords thou shalt put on the two settings, and shalt put them on the shoulders of the ephod over against the faces thereof.
26. And thou shalt make two rings of gold, and thou shalt put them upon the two extremities of the breastplate, upon the edge thereof, which is toward the side of the ephod inward.
27. And thou shalt make two rings of gold; and shalt put them on the two shoulders of the ephod underneath, over against its faces, opposite to the joining thereof, above the girdle of the ephod.
28. And they shall bind the breastplate by the rings thereof unto the rings of the ephod with a thread of blue, that it may be upon the girdle of the ephod, and that the breastplate withdraw not from upon the ephod.
29. And Aaron shall carry the names of the sons of Israel in the breastplate of judgment upon his heart, when he goeth in unto the holiness, for a remembrance before Jehovah continually.
30. And thou shalt put unto the breastplate of judgment the Urim and the Thummim; and they shall be upon Aaron’s heart, when he goeth in before Jehovah; and Aaron shall carry the judgment of the sons of Israel upon his heart before Jehovah continually.
31. And thou shalt make the robe of the ephod all of blue.
32. And there shall be a mouth of the head of it in the midst thereof; there shall be a lip for the mouth of it round about, the work of the weaver, as the mouth of a coat of mail it shall be, that it be not rent.
33. And upon the skirts of it thou shalt make pomegranates of blue, and of crimson, and of scarlet double-dyed, upon the skirts thereof round about; and bells of gold in the midst of them round about.
34. A bell of gold and a pomegranate, a bell of gold and a pomegranate, upon the skirts of the robe round about.
35. And it shall be upon Aaron to minister; and the voice thereof shall be heard when he goeth in unto the holiness before Jehovah, and when he goeth out, that he die not.
36. And thou shalt make a plate of pure gold, and engrave upon it with the engravings of a signet, Holiness to Jehovah.
37. And thou shalt put it upon a thread of blue, and it shall be upon the miter; over against the faces of the miter it shall be.
38. And it shall be upon Aaron’s forehead, and Aaron shall bear the iniquity of the holy things, which the sons of Israel shall sanctify in respect to all the gifts of their holy things; and it shall be upon his forehead continually, to make them well-pleasing before Jehovah.
39. And thou shalt checker the tunic of fine linen, and thou shalt make a miter of fine linen, and a belt thou shalt make with the work of the embroiderer.
40. And for Aaron’s sons thou shalt make tunics, and thou shalt make for them belts; and tiaras shalt thou make for them, for glory and for comeliness.
41. And thou shalt put them on Aaron thy brother, and on his sons with him; and shalt anoint them, and fill their hand, and shalt sanctify them, and they shall minister to Me in the priest’s office.
42. And thou shalt make for them breeches of linen to cover the flesh of nakedness; from the loins even unto the thighs they shall be.
43. And they shall be upon Aaron, and upon his sons, when they go in unto the Tent of meeting, or when they come near unto the altar to minister in the holiness; lest they bear iniquity, and die: it is a statute of an age to him and to his seed after him.
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9804 9804. THE CONTENTS.
The subject here treated of is the garments of holiness which Aaron and his sons were to put on when they ministered. By the priesthood which Aaron with his sons was to administer was represented the Lord in respect to the Divine celestial, which is the Divine good in heaven; and by Aaron’s garments was represented the Divine spiritual, which is the Divine truth thence proceeding.

AC (Potts) n. 9805 sRef Ex@28 @1 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @2 S0′ 9805. THE INTERNAL SENSE.
Verses 1, 2. And thou shalt cause to draw near unto thee Aaron thy brother, and his sons with him, from the midst of the sons of Israel, that he may minister in the priest’s office to Me; Aaron, Nadab and Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar, Aaron’s sons. And thou shalt make garments of holiness for Aaron thy brother, for glory and for comeliness. “And thou shalt cause to draw near unto thee Aaron thy brother,” signifies the conjunction of Divine truth with Divine good in the Lord’s Divine Human; “and his sons with him,” signifies the Divine truth that proceeds from the Divine good; “from the midst of the sons of Israel,” signifies in heaven and in the church; “that he may minister in the priest’s office to Me,” signifies a representative of the Lord; “Aaron,” signifies in respect to the Divine celestial; “Nadab and Abihu,” signifies in respect to the Divine spiritual thence derived; “Eleazar and Ithamar,” signifies in respect to the Divine natural; “Aaron’s sons,” signifies which proceed from the Divine celestial; “and thou shalt make garments of holiness for Aaron thy brother,” signifies a representative of the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom; “for glory and for comeliness,” signifies in order to present, in the internal and the external form, Divine truth such as it is in the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom.

AC (Potts) n. 9806 sRef Ex@28 @1 S0′ 9806. And thou shalt cause to draw near unto thee Aaron thy brother. That this signifies the conjunction of Divine truth with Divine good in the Lord’s Divine Human, is evident from the representation of Moses, who here causes Aaron to draw near to himself, as being the Lord in respect to Divine truth (see n. 6752, 6771, 7014, 9372); from the signification of “drawing near,” as being conjunction and presence (n. 9378); from the representation of Aaron, as being the Lord in respect to Divine good (of which in what follows); and from the signification of “brother,” as being good (n. 3303, 3803, 3815, 4121, 4191, 5686, 5692, 6756). From all this it is plain that by “Moses causing Aaron his brother to draw near unto him” is signified the conjunction of Divine truth with Divine good in the Lord. That it signifies in His Divine Human, is because this was the very thing in which this conjunction was effected; for the Lord first made His Human Divine truth, and afterward Divine good (see the places cited in n. 9199, 9315). That Aaron was chosen to minister in the priesthood, was because he was the brother of Moses; for in this way there was at the same time represented the brotherhood of Divine truth and Divine good in heaven, because as before said, Moses represented Divine truth, and Aaron Divine good.
[2] All things in the universe, both in heaven and in the world, bear relation to good and to truth in order to be anything; for good is the being of truth, and truth is the coming-forth of good; and therefore good without truth does not come-forth, and truth without good has no being; from which it is evident that they must be conjoined. Their conjunction is represented in the Word by two married partners, and also by two brothers; by two married partners, when the subject treated of is the heavenly marriage, which is that of good and truth, and successive derivation from it; and by two brothers, when the subject treated of is the double ministry of judgment and of worship.
Those who ministered in judgment were called “judges,” and afterward “kings;” and those who ministered in worship were called “priests.” And because all judgment is effected by means of truth, and all worship is effected from good, therefore by “judges” in the Word, in a sense abstracted from person, is signified truth from good; but by “kings,” truth from which is good; and by “priests” is signified good itself. It is from this that in the Word the Lord is called a “Judge,” also a “Prophet,” and likewise a “King,” when truth is treated of; but a “Priest” when good is treated of. In like manner He is called “the Christ,” “the Anointed,” or “the Messiah,” when truth is treated of; but “Jesus,” or “Savior,” when good is treated of.
sRef Ps@118 @3 S3′ sRef Ps@118 @2 S3′ sRef Ps@115 @9 S3′ sRef Ps@135 @19 S3′ sRef Ps@115 @10 S3′ sRef Ps@115 @12 S3′ [3] On account of this brotherhood, which is that of the truth which is of judgment and the good which is of worship, Aaron the brother of Moses was chosen to minister in the priesthood. That by “Aaron and his house” is therefore signified good, is evident in the following passages:
O Israel, trust thou in Jehovah; He is their help and their shield. O house of Aaron, trust ye in Jehovah; He is their help and their shield. Jehovah hath remembered us, He will bless the house of Israel, He will bless the house of Aaron (Ps. 115:9, 10, 12).
Let Israel now say, that His mercy is forever. Let the house of Aaron now say, that His mercy is forever (Ps. 118:2, 3).
O house of Israel, bless ye Jehovah; O house of Aaron, bless ye Jehovah (Ps. 135:19).
“The house of Israel” denotes those who are in truths; “the house of Aaron,” those who are in goods; for in the Word, where truth is treated of, good is also treated of, because of the heavenly marriage (n. 9263, 9314); (that “the house of Israel” denotes those who are in truths, see n. 5414, 5879, 5951, 7956, 8234).
sRef Ps@133 @1 S4′ sRef Ps@105 @26 S4′ sRef Isa@15 @2 S4′ sRef Ps@133 @2 S4′ [4] Again;
Jehovah sent Moses His servant, Aaron whom He had chosen (Ps. 105:26);
where Moses is called a “servant” because a “servant” is predicated of truths (n. 3409); and a “chosen one” is predicated of good (n. 3755). Again:
Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity. It is like the good oil upon the head, that went down upon the beard, even Aaron’s beard; that went down upon the mouth of his garments (Ps. 133:1, 2).
He who does not know what is signified by a “brother,” what by “oil,” what by “the head,” what by “the beard,” what by “garments,” and likewise what Aaron represents, cannot apprehend why these things are compared to the dwelling together of brethren, for how can the oil that went down from the head upon Aaron’s beard, and from thence upon his garments, be like the concord of brethren? But the likeness in the comparison is plain from the internal sense, in which the subject treated of is the influx of good into truths, and the brotherhood of these is described in this way. For “oil” denotes good; “the head of Aaron,” the inmost of good; “the beard,” the most external of it; “garments” denote truths; and “to go down” denotes influx. From this it is clear that by these words is signified the influx of good from interiors to exteriors into truths, and conjunction there. Without the internal sense, who can see that these heavenly things are contained in these words? (That “oil” denotes the good of love, see n. 886, 4582, 4638, 9780; that “the head” denotes what is inmost, n. 5328, 6436, 7859, 9656; that “the beard” denotes what is most external, is evident in Isaiah 7:20; 15:2; in Jeremiah 48:37; and in Ezekiel 5:1; that “garments” denote truths, n. 2576, 4545, 4763, 5319, 5954, 6914, 6917, 9093, 9212, 9216; and that “Aaron” denotes celestial good, may be seen above.)
sRef Ex@32 @5 S5′ sRef Ex@32 @4 S5′ sRef Deut@9 @20 S5′ [5] From the fact that Aaron was chosen to minister in the priest’s office, thus to administer the most holy things, it may be comprehended how the case was with the representations in the Jewish Church, namely, that they did not regard the person who represented, but the thing that was represented; thus that a holy thing, nay, a most holy one, could be represented by persons whose interiors were unclean, and even idolatrous, provided that while they were in worship their externals were disposed to holiness. The quality of Aaron can be seen from the following words in Moses:
Aaron took the gold from the hand of the sons of Israel, and fashioned it with a graving tool, and made it a molten calf. And Aaron built an altar before it; and Aaron made proclamation and said, Tomorrow shall be a feast to Jehovah (Exod. 32:4, 5, 25).
Jehovah was moved with anger exceedingly against Aaron, to destroy him; but I prayed for Aaron also in that time (Deut. 9:20).
(That the representatives of the church with the Israelitish and Jewish nation did not regard persons, but the things themselves, see the places cited in n. 9229.)

AC (Potts) n. 9807 sRef Ex@28 @1 S0′ 9807. And his sons. That this signifies the Divine truth that proceeds from the Divine good, is evident from the signification of “sons,” as being truths (see n. 489, 491, 533, 1147, 2623, 2803, 2813, 3373, 3704), here the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good, because they were the sons of Aaron, and by Aaron as high-priest was represented the Lord as to Divine good (as has been shown just above). That “sons” denote truths, is because all things in the internal sense of the Word are spiritual; and in the spiritual sense “sons” denote those who are born anew from the Lord, thus who are in truths from good, consequently abstractedly from persons, the truths themselves which are from good. These therefore are what are meant in the Word by “the sons of God,” “the sons of a king,” and “the sons of the kingdom.” They are also “the sons of the new birth,” or regeneration. Moreover, the truths and goods with a regenerated man, or one born anew from the Lord, are exactly like families in a large and long series from one father. There are those which bear relation to sons and daughters, to grandsons and granddaughters, to sons-in-law and daughters-in-law, and thus to relationships of many degrees, and therefore of many kinds. Truths and goods thus arranged are what in the spiritual sense are “sons,” “daughters,” “grandsons,” “granddaughters,” “sons-in-law,” “daughters-in-law,” in a word, relations of various degrees, and consequently of various kinds. That spiritual generations are in such an order has been shown by living experience, and at the same time it was said that the truths and goods with a regenerate man are in such an order for the reason that the angelic societies in heaven are in the same, and the truths and goods with man correspond to these societies; wherefore also the man whose truths and goods are in such a correspondence is a heaven in the least form.
sRef John@12 @36 S2′ sRef John@12 @34 S2′ sRef John@12 @35 S2′ [2] Anyone who knows that by “sons” are signified truths, and by “daughters” goods, can see many arcana in the Word, especially in the prophetic Word, that otherwise would be hidden; as also what is meant in particular by “the Son of man,” which the Lord often calls Himself in the Word. That the Divine truth which proceeds from His Divine Human is meant, is evident from the passages in which He is so named, and which may be here cited for the purpose of confirming at the same time that a “son” denotes truth; as in John:
The crowd said unto Jesus, How sayest Thou, the Son of man must be exalted? Who is this Son of man? Jesus answered them, Yet a little while is the light with you. Walk while ye have the light, lest darkness take you. While ye have the light, believe in the light, that ye may be sons of light (John 12:34-36).
From these words it is evident that by “the Son of man” is signified the like as by “the light,” for when they inquired, Who is this Son of man? the Lord answered that He was the light in which they should believe (that this “light” denotes the Divine truth, see the places cited in n. 9548, 9684); thus it also denotes the Son of man.
sRef Luke@17 @23 S3′ sRef Luke@17 @22 S3′ sRef Luke@6 @22 S3′ [3] In Luke:
Blessed are ye when men shall hate you for the Son of man’s sake (Luke 6:22);
where “for the Son of man’s sake” denotes for the sake of the Divine truth which proceeds from the Lord; Divine truth is everything of faith in, and of love to, the Lord, and “being hated for the sake of this” is “blessedness.” Again:
The days will come when ye shall desire to see one of the days of the Son of man, but ye shall not see it. Then they shall say unto you, Lo here! or Lo there! go not away, nor make search (Luke 17:22, 23);
“to desire to see one of the days of the Son of man” denotes to see one of the states of Divine truth which is genuine. The subject here treated of is the end of the church, when there is no longer any faith, because no charity; at which time all genuine truth Divine will perish; and because truth Divine is signified by “the Son of man,” therefore it is said, “then they shall say, Lo here! or Lo there! search not,” which can be said of truth Divine from the Lord, but not of the Lord Himself. sRef Matt@24 @27 S4′ sRef Luke@18 @8 S4′ sRef Matt@24 @30 S4′ [4] Again:
When the Son of man cometh, shall He find faith on the earth? (Luke 18:8);
that is, when truth Divine shall be revealed from heaven, it will not be believed. “The Son of man” here also denotes the Lord as to truth Divine, that is, the truth Divine which proceeds from the Lord. “The coming of the Lord” denotes the revelation of truth Divine at the end of the church.
[5] In Matthew:
As the lightning goeth forth from the east, and appeareth even unto the west, so shall be the coming of the Son of man. Then shall appear the sign, and then shall all the tribes of the earth wail, and they shall see the Son of man coming in the clouds of heaven with power and glory (Matt. 24:27, 30);
“the coming of the Son of man” denotes the revelation of truth Divine in the consummation of the age, that is, at the end of the church; “all the tribes of the earth which shall then wail,” denote all the truths and goods of faith and of love from the Lord, and thus to the Lord, in the complex; “the clouds of heaven in which He will come,” denote the literal sense of the Word; “power and glory” denote the internal sense, in the inmost of which the subject treated of is the Lord alone (see the further explication of these words in n. 4060).
sRef Matt@26 @64 S6′ sRef Luke@22 @69 S6′ [6] In like manner elsewhere:
I say unto you, Henceforth ye shall see the Son of man sitting at the right hand of power, and coming upon the clouds of heaven (Matt. 26:64).
From henceforth shall the Son of man be sitting at the right hand of the power of God (Luke 22:69).
“The Son of man” denotes the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord; “sitting at the right hand of power” denotes that He has omnipotence, for Divine good has omnipotence by means of Divine truth; its being said that “from henceforth they shall see it” signifies that Divine truth was in its omnipotence after the Lord in the world had conquered the hells, and had reduced all things therein and in the heavens into order, and that in this way those could be saved who would receive Him in faith and love (see n. 9715). (That “sitting at the right hand” denotes omnipotence, see n. 3387, 4592, 4933, 7518, 8281, 9133; that good has all power through truth, see n. 6344, 6423, 8304, 9327, 9410, 9639, 9643; that the Divine power itself is Divine truth, n. 6948; that “the clouds in which the Son of man,” that is, Divine truth, “will come,” denote the Word in the letter, see the preface to Genesis 18; and n. 4060, 4391, 5922, 6343, 6752, 8443, 8781; and that “glory” denotes the Divine truth itself, such as it is in the internal sense of the Word, see the preface to Genesis 18; and n. 4809, 5922, 8267, 9429.)
sRef Matt@19 @28 S7′ sRef Rev@14 @14 S7′ sRef John@5 @27 S7′ sRef Matt@25 @31 S7′ sRef Matt@16 @27 S7′ sRef Dan@7 @13 S7′ [7] From all this it can now be seen what is signified by these words:
I saw and behold a white cloud; and on the cloud one sitting like, unto the Son of man, having on His head a golden crown (Rev. 14:14).
I saw in the night visions, and behold there came with the clouds of heaven one like unto the Son of man (Dan. 7:13).
The Father gave Him to execute judgment, because He is the Son of man (John 5:27).
As all judgment is effected from truth, it is said that it was “given to the Lord to execute judgment, because He is the Son of man;” “the Son of man,” as before said, denotes the Divine truth; the Father from whom it proceeds, denotes the Divine good (n. 2803, 3704, 7499, 8328, 8897). As it pertains to Divine truth to execute judgment, therefore it is said that “when He shall come, the Son of man shall sit upon the throne of His glory” (Matt. 19:28; 25:31); and that “the Son of man shall render to everyone according to his deeds” (Matt. 16:27).
sRef Matt@13 @38 S8′ sRef Matt@13 @37 S8′ [8] Further:
He that soweth the good seed is the Son of man; the field is the world; the seed are the sons of the kingdom; the tares are the sons of the evil one (Matt. 13:37, 38);
“the good seed” denotes truth Divine, therefore it is said that “the Son of man soweth it;” “the sons of the kingdom” denote truths Divine in heaven and in the church, for a “son” denotes truth (see n. 489, 491, 533, 1147, 2623), and in the opposite sense, falsity, which also is “the son of the evil one;” “the kingdom” denotes heaven, and likewise the church.
sRef John@3 @13 S9′ sRef Matt@8 @20 S9′ [9] In John:
No man hath ascended into heaven, but He that came down from heaven, the Son of man who is in the heavens (John 3:13);
from this it is evident that “the Son of man” denotes the Divine truth in the heavens; for this comes down, and therefore ascends, because no one can ascend into heaven unless Divine truth comes down into him from heaven, because the influx is Divine, and not the other way about. And because the Lord is this truth, therefore He calls Himself “the Son of man who is in the heavens.” In Matthew:
The Son of man hath not where to lay His head (Matt. 8:20);
here “the Son of man” denotes the Divine truth; “not having where to lay His head,” means that Divine truth had no place anywhere, or with any man, at that time.
sRef Jer@51 @43 S10′ sRef Matt@26 @2 S10′ sRef Mark@9 @12 S10′ sRef Matt@20 @18 S10′ sRef Mark@9 @31 S10′ sRef John@14 @6 S10′ sRef Matt@17 @23 S10′ sRef Mark@8 @31 S10′ sRef Matt@17 @22 S10′ sRef Jer@49 @33 S10′ sRef Matt@26 @25 S10′ sRef Matt@26 @24 S10′ sRef Matt@17 @12 S10′ sRef Jer@49 @18 S10′ [10] That “the Son of man was to suffer, and to be put to death” (Matt. 17:12, 23; 20:18; 26:2, 24, 45; Mark 8:31; 9:12, 31; and elsewhere), involves that such was the treatment of Divine truth, and consequently of the Lord, who was the Divine truth itself, as also He Himself teaches in the following passages:
I am the way, and the truth, and the life (John 14:6).
No man shall dwell there, neither shall any son of man stay therein (Jer. 49:18, 33).
In the cities shall no man dwell, neither shall any son of man pass through them (Jer. 51:43).
Anyone not acquainted with the spiritual sense of the Word will believe that by “cities” are here meant cities, and that by “man” and “the son of man” are meant a man and a son; and that the cities would be so desolated that no one would dwell there; but it is the state of the church in respect to the doctrine of truth which is described by these words; for “cities” denote the doctrinal things of the church (n. 402, 2449, 3216, 4492, 4493); “a man,” the truth itself of the church conjoined with good (n. 3134, 7716, 9007); therefore “the son of man” denotes truth.
[11] As by “the Son of man” was signified the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, therefore also the prophets, through whom it was revealed, were called “sons of man,” as in Daniel 8:17; in Ezekiel 2:1, 3, 6, 8; 3:1, 3, 4, 10, 17, 25; 4:1, 16; 8:5, 6, 8, 12, 15; 12:2, 3, 9, 18, 22, 27; and in many other passages.
sRef Ps@146 @3 S12′ sRef Isa@51 @12 S12′ [12] As most expressions in the Word have also an opposite sense, it is the same with the signification of “the son of man,” which in this sense denotes the falsity that is opposite to truth, as in Isaiah:
Who art thou, that thou art afraid of man that dieth, and of the son of man who is given as grass? (Isa. 51:12);
where “the son of man given as grass” denotes the memory-knowledge through which falsity arises. In David:
Put not your trust in princes, in the son of man, in whom there is no salvation (Ps. 146:3);
where “princes” denote primary truths (n. 2089, 5044), thus in the opposite sense, primary falsities; and “the son of man” denotes the falsity itself.

AC (Potts) n. 9808 sRef Ex@28 @1 S0′ 9808. From the midst of the sons of Israel. That this signifies in heaven and in the church, is evident from the signification of “Israel,” as being those who are of the church, thus abstractedly the church itself (see n. 4286, 6426, 6637, 6862, 6868, 7035, 7062, 7198, 7201, 7215, 7223, 8805, 9340); and as “Israel” denotes the church, it also denotes heaven, for heaven and the church make one, and the church is the heaven of the Lord on earth. Moreover, heaven is within every member of the church when he is in truth and at the same time in good from the Lord.

AC (Potts) n. 9809 sRef Ex@28 @1 S0′ 9809. That he may minister in the priest’s office to Me. That this signifies a representative of the Lord, is evident from the representation of “the priest’s office,” as being in the supreme sense every office which the Lord discharges as the Savior; and whatever He does as the Savior is from Divine love, thus from Divine good, for all good is of love. For this reason also by “the priest’s office” in the supreme sense is signified the Divine good of the Lord’s Divine love. There is Divine good, and there is Divine truth; Divine good is in the Lord, and therefore it is His being, which in the Word is called “Jehovah;” but Divine truth is from the Lord, and therefore it is the coming-forth from this being, which in the Word is meant by “God;” and as that which comes forth from Him is also Himself, therefore also the Lord is Divine truth, which is His Divine in the heavens. For the heavens come forth from Him, because the angels who are there are receptions of His Divine; the celestial angels being receptions of the Divine good which is from Him, and the spiritual angels being receptions of the Divine truth which is thence derived. From all this it can be seen what of the Lord was represented by the priestly office, and what of the Lord was represented by the kingly office; namely, by the priestly office the Divine good of His Divine love, and by the kingly office the Divine truth thence derived.
sRef Ps@110 @2 S2′ sRef Ps@110 @4 S2′ sRef Ps@110 @3 S2′ sRef Ps@110 @5 S2′ sRef Ps@110 @6 S2′ sRef Ps@110 @7 S2′ sRef Ps@110 @1 S2′ [2] That by the priestly office was represented the Divine good of the Lord’s Divine love, thus every office which the Lord discharges as the Savior is evident from the following passages in the Word:
The saying of Jehovah unto my Lord, Sit Thou at My right hand, until I make Thine enemies Thy footstool. Jehovah shall send forth the scepter of strength out of Zion; rule Thou in the midst of Thine enemies. Thy people is one of readinesses in the day of Thy strength, in the honors of holiness from the womb of the dawn, Thou hast the dew of Thy birth. Jehovah hath sworn, and will not repent, Thou art a priest forever, according to My word, Melchizedek. The Lord at Thy right hand hath smitten kings in the day of His anger; He hath judged among the nations; He hath filled with dead bodies; He hath smitten the head over much land. He shall drink of the stream in the way: therefore shall He lift up the head (Ps. 110:1-7).
From this it is plain what the Lord is as a priest, consequently what the priestly office represented in the Lord, namely, all the work of the salvation of the human race; for in this passage the subject treated of is the Lord’s combats with the hells, while He was in the world, through which He acquired for Himself Divine omnipotence over the hells, by virtue of which He saved the human race, and also saves at this day all those who receive Him. It is this salvation itself, because it is from the Divine good of the Divine love, by virtue of which it is said of the Lord, “Thou art a priest forever, according to My word, Melchizedek.” “Melchizedek” means “the king of righteousness”; and the Lord was so called from the fact that He became righteousness, and thereby salvation (according to what was shown above, n. 9715).
[3] But as each particular expression in the above Psalm contains arcana concerning the Lord’s combats while He was in the world, and these cannot be revealed without the internal sense, therefore they may here be briefly unfolded. “The saying of Jehovah unto My Lord” signifies that it is said of the Lord while He was in the world (that by “the Lord” here is meant the Lord as to the Divine Human is evident in Matthew 22:41-43, in Mark 12:35, 36, and in Luke 20:41-44). “Sit thou at My right hand” signifies the omnipotence of Divine good through the Divine truth which the Lord then was, and from which He fought and conquered (that “sitting at the right hand” denotes a state of power, and that when said of the Divine it denotes omnipotence, see n. 3387, 4592, 4933, 7518, 7673, 8281, 9133; and that all the power of good is through truth, n. 6344, 6423, 8304, 9327, 9410, 9639, 9643).
[4] “Until I make Thine enemies Thy footstool” signifies until the evils which are in the hells shall be subjugated and made subject to his Divine power. “Jehovah shall send forth the scepter of strength out of Zion” signifies power then from celestial good (that “Zion” denotes this good, see n. 2362, 9055). “Rule Thou in the midst of Thine enemies” signifies that this good has dominion over evils; evils are meant by “enemies” because they are opposed to the Divine, and specifically to the Lord. “Thy people is one of readinesses in the day of Thy strength” signifies the Divine truths then fighting. “In the honors of holiness” signifies which are from the Divine good. “From the womb of the dawn, Thou hast the dew of Thy birth,” signifies conception from the Divine good itself from which He had Divine truth. “Jehovah hath sworn and will not repent” signifies what is stable and certain.
[5] “Thou art a priest forever” signifies the Divine good of the Divine love in Him. “According to My word, Melchizedek,” signifies that His Divine Human is the like; “Melchizedek” means “king of righteousness,” thus that Jehovah became righteous through combats and victories (n. 9715). “The Lord at Thy right hand” signifies the Divine truth which is then from Him, through which He has omnipotence, as above. “Hath smitten kings in the day of His anger” signifies the destruction then of falsities; “the day of anger” was when He fought against evils and destroyed them; “kings” denote truths, and in the opposite sense falsities (n. 2015, 2069, 4575, 4581, 4966, 5044, 5068, 6148). “He hath judged among the nations” signifies the dispersion of evils; for “nations” denote goods, and in the opposite sense evils (n. 1259, 1260, 1849, 6005). “He hath filled with dead bodies” signifies thus spiritual death, which is the total deprivation of truth and good. “He hath smitten the head over much land” signifies the casting down of the infernal love of self into the hells, and its damnation. “He shall drink of the stream in the way, therefore shall He lift up the head,” signifies the endeavor to emerge by means of reasonings about truths. This is the sense of the above words which is perceived in heaven when this Psalm is read by man.
[6] As the priestly office was representative of the Lord in respect to all the work of salvation from Divine love, therefore also all Divine worship belonged to the office of the priest; which worship at that time consisted chiefly in offering burnt-offerings, sacrifices, and meat-offerings, and in arranging the breads of faces upon the table, in lighting the lamps every day, and in burning incense; consequently in making expiation for the people and in remitting sins. Moreover, when the priests were at the same time prophets, it also consisted in unfolding the Divine law, and in teaching. That Aaron with his sons performed all these things is evident from the institution of the priest’s office in Moses. That all these things were representative of the Lord’s works of salvation, is manifest; wherefore also that part of the sacrifices and meat-offerings which was for Jehovah, that is, for the Lord, was given to Aaron; in like manner the firstfruits of various kinds, and also the tithes (see Exod. 29:1-36; Lev. 7:35-36; 23:15-21; 27:21; Num. 5:6-10; 18:8-20, and 25 to the end; Deut. 18:1-5), and the firstborn; but instead of all the firstborn of men were the Levites, who were given as a gift to Aaron (Num. 1:47; 3:9), for the reason that they belonged to Jehovah (Num. 3:12-13, 40-45).
sRef Deut@18 @2 S7′ sRef Num@26 @61 S7′ sRef Num@26 @60 S7′ sRef Num@26 @62 S7′ sRef Num@26 @59 S7′ sRef Num@18 @20 S7′ sRef Deut@10 @9 S7′ sRef Num@26 @63 S7′ sRef Deut@18 @1 S7′ sRef Num@26 @58 S7′ [7] As the Lord in respect to the whole work of salvation was represented by the high-priest, and the work of salvation itself by his office, which is called the priesthood, therefore no inheritance and portion with the people was given to Aaron and his sons, for it is declared that Jehovah God is their inheritance and portion (Num. 18:20); neither was any portion given to the Levites, because they belonged to Aaron (Num. 26:58-63; Deut. 10:9; 18:1, 2). For the people represented heaven and the church, but Aaron with his sons and with the Levites represented the good of love and of faith which makes heaven and the church, thus they represented the Lord from whom is this good. For this reason the land was granted to the people for an inheritance, but not to the priests, for the Lord is in them, but not among them as one of them and distinct from them.
sRef Isa@61 @6 S8′ [8] The like is involved in these words from Isaiah:
Ye shall be called the priests of Jehovah, the ministers of our God; ye shall eat the wealth of the nations, and in their glory ye shall boast yourselves (Isa. 61:6);
where “eating the wealth of the nations” denotes to appropriate goods to themselves; “boasting themselves in their glory” denotes to enjoy truths, thus to have joy and happiness from both. (That “nations” denote goods, see n. 1259, 1260, 4574, 6005; and that “glory” denotes truth from the Divine, n. 9429.)
sRef Jer@2 @26 S9′ sRef Jer@8 @1 S9′ sRef Matt@1 @20 S9′ sRef Rev@1 @6 S9′ sRef Matt@1 @21 S9′ sRef Jer@4 @9 S9′ [9] In the Word throughout “kings” and “priests” are mentioned in a series, also “kings,” “princes,” “priests,” and “prophets;” and in the internal sense by “kings” are there signified truths in the complex; by “princes,” primary truths; by “priests,” goods in the complex; and by “prophets,” doctrines, as in the following passages:
Jesus Christ hath made us kings and priests (Rev. 1:6; 5:10).
The house of Israel were ashamed, they, their kings, their princes, and their priests, and their prophets (Jer. 2:26).
In that day the heart of the king shall perish, and the heart of the princes; and the priests shall be amazed, and the prophets shall marvel (Jer. 4:9).
At that time they shall draw out the bones of the kings of Judah, and the bones of his princes, and the bones of the priests, and the bones of the prophets (Jer. 8:1).
(That by “kings” in the sense abstracted from persons are signified truths in the complex, see n. 1672, 2015, 2069, 4581, 4966, 5044, 6148; that by “princes” are signified primary truths, n. 1482, 2089, 5044; that “priests” denote goods, n. 1728, 2015, 3670, 6148; and that “prophets” denote doctrines derived from these things and concerning them, n. 2534, 7269.) The kingly office of the Lord is also signified by His name “Christ,” “Anointed,” “Messiah”; and His priestly office by His name “Jesus,” for “Jesus” means “Savior” or “Salvation,” concerning which it is thus written in Matthew:
The angel appeared unto Joseph in a dream, and said, Thou shalt call His name Jesus, for He shall save His people from their sins (Matt. 1:21).
As this belonged to the priest’s office, therefore the like was represented by the office of the high priest who made expiation for the people for sins (Lev. 4:26, 31, 35; 5:6, 10, 13, 16, 18; 9:7; 15:15, 30).
sRef Lev@21 @20 S10′ sRef Lev@22 @5 S10′ sRef Lev@22 @4 S10′ sRef Lev@22 @8 S10′ sRef Lev@21 @10 S10′ sRef Lev@22 @7 S10′ sRef Lev@21 @18 S10′ sRef Lev@21 @19 S10′ sRef Lev@22 @2 S10′ sRef Lev@22 @3 S10′ sRef Lev@21 @17 S10′ sRef Lev@22 @6 S10′ sRef Lev@21 @15 S10′ sRef Lev@21 @13 S10′ sRef Lev@21 @11 S10′ sRef Lev@21 @14 S10′ sRef Lev@21 @12 S10′ sRef Lev@22 @9 S10′ [10] Seeing that evil cannot possibly be joined to good, because they have aversion for each other, therefore purifications of various kinds were commanded for Aaron and his sons when they ministered in the priest’s office, whether at the altar, or in the Tent of meeting; and it was also commanded that the high priest was not to marry any but a virgin; not a widow, nor one divorced, nor a harlot (Lev. 21:13-15); that those of the sons of Aaron who were unclean “if they should eat of the sanctified things, were to be cut off” (Lev. 22:2-9); that “no one of the seed of Aaron in whom was a blemish should offer bread” (Lev. 21:17-21); that “the high priest was not to shave his head, to rend his garments, to defile himself with any dead body, not even of his father and his mother, and that he was not to go out of the sanctuary” (Lev. 21:10-12). As before said, these and many other laws were enacted for the reason that the high priest represented the Lord as to Divine good; and good is of such a nature that evil cannot be joined to it, for good shuns evil, and evil dreads good as hell dreads heaven; and therefore no conjunction of them is possible.
[11] But as for truth, it is of such a character that falsity can be joined to it; yet not the falsity in which there is evil; but that in which there is good, such as there is with little children, and with boys and girls while they are as yet in innocence, and with well-disposed Gentiles who are in ignorance; and such as there is with all who are in the literal sense of the Word, and who remain in the doctrine thence derived, and who nevertheless have the good of life as their end; for this good, as the end, drives away all the malevolence of falsity, and by applying itself forms the falsity into a certain likeness of truth.

AC (Potts) n. 9810 sRef Ex@28 @1 S0′ 9810. Aaron. That this signifies a representative of the Lord in respect to the Divine celestial, is evident from the representation of Aaron, as being the Lord as to Divine good (see above, n. 9806). The Divine celestial is the Divine of the Lord in the inmost heaven; for the angels of this heaven are called celestial angels, and are receptions of Divine truth in their will part. When the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord is received in this part, it is called celestial good; but when received in the intellectual part it is called spiritual good. (The quality of these two goods, that is, of celestial good and of spiritual good, and the nature of the difference between them, may be seen in the places cited in n. 9277, 9543.)

AC (Potts) n. 9811 sRef Ex@28 @1 S0′ 9811. Nadab and Abihu. That this signifies in respect to the Divine spiritual thence derived, is evident from the representation of the sons of Aaron, as being the Divine truth that proceeds from the Divine good (see above, n. 9807). The Divine spiritual is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Divine celestial; thus is the Divine of the Lord received in the middle or second heaven. This is represented by the two first born sons of Aaron, because it proceeds, and thus is as it were born, as a son from a father, from the celestial good which is in the inmost heaven. But by the two younger sons of Aaron, who are Eleazar and Ithamar (so long as the firstborn, Nadab and Abihu, lived), is represented the Divine in the ultimate heaven, which heaven follows next after the former or middle heaven; and which is the Divine natural (of which in the following article).

AC (Potts) n. 9812 sRef Ex@28 @1 S0′ 9812. Eleazar and Ithamar. That this signifies in respect to the Divine natural, is evident from the fact that these were the younger sons of Aaron, and that by Aaron is represented the Lord as to the Divine celestial; wherefore by his sons is represented the Lord as to the Divine which succeeds in order; thus by the elder sons is represented the Lord as to the Divine spiritual; and by the younger sons the Lord as to the Divine natural; for the Divine goods in the heavens succeed in this order; nay, the heavens themselves which are in these goods do so. Moreover, one good comes forth, and also subsists, through another.
[2] Divine celestial good, which makes the third or inmost heaven, is the good of love to the Lord; Divine spiritual good, which makes the middle or second heaven, is the good of charity toward the neighbor; and Divine natural good, which makes the first or ultimate heaven, is the good of faith and of obedience. To Divine natural good pertains also civil good, which is called what is just among citizens; and also moral good, which is that of all the virtues that belong to what is honorable.
[3] These three goods follow in order, like end, cause, and effect; and as the end is the soul of the cause, and the cause is all that is efficient in the effect, so celestial good is the soul of spiritual good, and spiritual good is everything in natural good. That which is the soul, and that which is everything, in something else, is within it, as endeavor is in motion, or as will is in action. That will is the soul and everything in action, is plain, for when will ceases, action ceases. From all this it can be seen how the case is with the celestial, the spiritual, and the natural; namely, that inmostly in natural good there must be celestial good, that is, the good of love to the Lord, which also is the good of innocence.

AC (Potts) n. 9813 sRef Ex@28 @1 S0′ 9813. Aaron’s sons. That this signifies the things which proceed from the Divine celestial, is evident from the signification of “sons,” as being those things which are born from another thing as from a father, thus which proceed; and from the representation of Aaron, as being the Lord in respect to the Divine celestial (of which just above, n. 9810). From this it is evident that by “the sons of Aaron” are signified those things which proceed from the Divine celestial.

AC (Potts) n. 9814 sRef Ex@28 @2 S0′ 9814. And thou shalt make garments of holiness for Aaron thy brother. That this signifies a representative of the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom, is evident from the signification of “garments,” as being truths in general, and indeed truths which clothe good (see n. 5954, 9212, 9216). That “garments” denote truths, originates in heaven, where angels appear clothed in garments in accordance with their truths from good (n. 165, 5248, 5954, 9212); from which it can be seen that by the garments of Aaron was represented the spiritual kingdom of the Lord joined to His celestial kingdom. For Aaron represented the Lord as to the Divine celestial (n. 9810); whence the garments joined to him represented the Divine spiritual joined to the celestial kingdom, as a garment is to the body. The Divine spiritual is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good; this appears in heaven as light, and moreover, is the light which illumines the external as well as the internal sight of the angels. The modification of this light according to the recipient subjects, which are angels, presents to the sight various phenomena, such as clouds, rainbows, colors, and splendors, of various kinds; and it also presents shining garments about the angels. From this it can be seen that the spiritual kingdom of the Lord was represented by Aaron’s garments of holiness. For there are two kingdoms into which the heavens have been divided, the celestial kingdom and the spiritual kingdom (on which see n. 9277); they who are in the celestial kingdom appear naked, but they who are in the spiritual kingdom appear clothed. From this it is again evident that it is Divine truth, or the Divine spiritual, and which appears as light, that invests or clothes.
[2] But who could possibly believe that within the church, where there is the Word, and the consequent enlightenment about Divine and heavenly things, ignorance so great should reign that it is not known that angels and spirits are in the human form, and appear to themselves as men; and also that they see and hear each other, and converse together; and that it is known still less that they appear clothed in garments. That this is the case falls not only into doubt, but also into total denial, with those who are so much immersed in outward things as to believe that the body alone lives, and that all is nothing which they do not see with the bodily eyes, and touch with the bodily hands (n. 1881); when yet the heavens are full of men, who are angels, and who are clothed in garments of varied resplendence. But nothing of these things can be seen by a man on earth through the eyes of his body; but through the eyes of his spirit, when these are opened by the Lord. The angels who were seen by the ancients, as by Abraham, Sarah, Lot, Jacob, Joshua, Gideon, and also the prophets, were not seen with the eyes of the body, but with the eyes of the spirit, which were then opened. That these angels appeared clothed in garments, is evident from the angels who sat at the Lord’s sepulcher, and were seen in shining white garments by Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of James (Matt. 28:3; Mark 16:5; Luke 24:4); and especially is the same thing evident from the Lord Himself when seen in His glory by Peter, James, and John, in that His raiment was then white and glistering, and was like the light (Matt. 17:2; Luke 9:29); by which raiment there was also represented the Divine spiritual, that is, the Divine truth which is from Him.
sRef Rev@3 @5 S3′ sRef Rev@3 @4 S3′ sRef Rev@19 @11 S3′ sRef Rev@19 @14 S3′ sRef Rev@4 @4 S3′ [3] From this it can be seen what is signified by “white garments” in Revelation:
Thou hast a few names in Sardis which have not defiled their garments, and they shall walk with Me in white, for they are worthy. He that overcometh, the same shall be clothed in white garments (Rev. 3:4, 5);
here “garments” denote spiritual truths, which are truths from good (as was shown above); and “white” denotes genuine truth (n. 3301, 4007, 5319). In like manner elsewhere:
I saw heaven open, and behold a white horse, and He that sat upon him was called Faithful and True; and in righteousness He doth judge and fight. His armies in heaven followed Him clothed in fine linen, white and clean (Rev. 19:11, 14).
Upon the thrones I saw four and twenty elders, clothed in white garments (Rev. 4:4).

AC (Potts) n. 9815 sRef Ex@28 @2 S0′ 9815. For glory and for comeliness. That this signifies in order to present, in the internal and the external form, Divine truth such as it is in the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom, is evident from the signification of “glory,” as being Divine truth (see the preface to Genesis 18; and n. 5922, 9429); and from the signification of “comeliness,” as also being Divine truth, but in the external form, for the brightness and beauty of Divine truth as it appears in externals is meant by “comeliness.” From this it is that the Word in the internal sense is called “glory,” but in the internal sense relatively to the brightness and beauty thence derived, it is called “comeliness.” Consequently the spiritual heaven, which is meant here by “the garments of holiness,” which serve “for glory and for comeliness,” is “glory” so far as Divine truth there is in an internal form, and is also “comeliness.”
sRef Dan@11 @16 S2′ sRef Dan@11 @41 S2′ sRef Dan@8 @9 S2′ sRef Isa@46 @13 S2′ sRef Lam@2 @1 S2′ sRef Isa@63 @15 S2′ [2] The like is signified by “comeliness” in the following passages. In Jeremiah:
The Lord in His anger doth cloud over the daughter of Zion; He hath cast forth from the heavens unto the earth the comeliness of Israel, neither doth He remember His footstool (Lam. 2:1);
where “the daughter of Zion” denotes the celestial church; and “the comeliness of Israel,” the spiritual church, which is called “comeliness” from the brightness and beauty of truth. In like manner in Isaiah:
I have made My righteousness to draw nigh; it is not far off, and My salvation shall not tarry; I will give salvation in Zion, unto Israel My comeliness (Isa. 46:13).
Look forth from the heavens, from the habitation of Thy holiness and of Thy comeliness (Isa. 63:15);
where “the habitation of holiness” denotes the celestial kingdom; and “the habitation of comeliness” the spiritual kingdom. And in Daniel:
And there came forth one horn from a little one, and grew exceedingly, toward the south, and toward the east, and toward comeliness (Dan. 8:9).
The king of the north shall stand in the land of comeliness, and there is consummation by his hand, and when he shall come into the land of comeliness, many shall be overthrown (Dan. 11:16, 41);
where “the land of comeliness” denotes the church of the Lord, in which is truth Divine, or the Word.

AC (Potts) n. 9816 sRef Ex@28 @3 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9816. Verses 3, 4. And thou shalt speak unto all the wise in heart, whom I have filled with the spirit of wisdom, and they shall make Aaron’s garments to sanctify him, that he may minister to Me in the priest’s office. And these are the garments which they shall make; a breastplate, and an ephod, and a robe, and a tunic of checker work, a miter, and a belt; and they shall make garments of holiness for Aaron thy brother, and for his sons, that he may minister to Me in the priest’s office. “And thou shalt speak unto all the wise in heart,” signifies the influx of the Lord through the Word into all who are in the good of love; “whom I have filled with the spirit of wisdom,” signifies in whom Divine truth has been inscribed; “and they shall make Aaron’s garments,” signifies through whom is the spiritual kingdom; “to sanctify him,” signifies thereby a representation of the Divine truth in this kingdom; “that he may minister to Me in the priest’s office,” signifies a representative of the Lord; “and these are the garments which they shall make,” signifies Divine truths in the spiritual kingdom, in their order; “a breastplate,” signifies Divine truth shining forth from Divine good; “and an ephod,” signifies Divine truth there in the external form in which interior things cease; “and a robe,” signifies Divine truth there in the internal form; “and a tunic of checker work,” signifies Divine truth there inmostly proceeding immediately from the Divine celestial; “a miter,” signifies intelligence and wisdom; “and a belt,” signifies a general bond, in order that all things may look to one end; “and they shall make garments of holiness for Aaron thy brother, and for his sons,” signifies thereby a representative of the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom; “that he may minister to Me in the priest’s office,” signifies a representative of the Lord.

AC (Potts) n. 9817 sRef Ex@28 @3 S0′ 9817. And thou shalt speak unto all the wise in heart. That this signifies the influx of the Lord through the Word into all who are in the good of love, is evident from the signification of “speaking,” as being influx (see n. 2951, 5481, 5743, 5797, 7270); and from the signification of “the wise in heart,” as being those who are in the good of love (of which in what follows). That the influx of the Lord through the Word is signified, is because the Lord flows in with the man of the church chiefly through the Word. The reason is that the Word is of such a nature that each and all things therein correspond to the Divine spiritual and Divine celestial things that are in the heavens; whence there is a communication of the affections and thoughts of man with the angels, insomuch that they are as it were a one. From this it is that the world is conjoined with heaven through the Word; but only with those who are in the good of faith and of love. From all this it can be seen that the influx of the Lord with the man of the church is through the Word; for in the heavens the Lord is everything, because the Divine which proceeds from Him and is received by the angels makes heaven.
[2] The reason why “the wise in heart” denote those who are in the good of love, is that wisdom is predicated of the life of heaven in man, and also that by “the heart” is signified the good of love. The life of heaven in man is expressed in the Word by “spirit” and by “heart;” by “spirit” is meant the life of man’s intellectual part, and by “heart” the life of his will part. To the intellectual part belongs truth, and to the will part belongs good. Truth belongs to faith, and good to love; for the understanding receives the truths which are of faith, and the will the goods which are of love. From this it is plain that by “the wise in heart” are signified those who are in the good of love from the Lord. The good of love is celestial good, through which is spiritual good; and spiritual good is that which covers celestial good, as garments cover the body. And as by the garments of Aaron was represented the spiritual kingdom of the Lord joined to His celestial kingdom, and the former comes forth through the latter, therefore it is here said that “the wise in heart,” that is, they who are in the good of love from the Lord, “shall make the garments for Aaron and his sons” (as in what follows). (That “the heart” denotes the good of love, or celestial good, see n. 3635, 3880, 3883-3896, 9050; and that on this account it denotes the will, n. 2930, 3888, 7542, 8910, 9113, 9300, 9495.)

AC (Potts) n. 9818 sRef Ex@28 @3 S0′ sRef Matt@5 @37 S0′ 9818. Whom I have filled with the spirit of wisdom. That this signifies in whom Divine truth has been inscribed, is evident from the signification of “the spirit of wisdom,” when said of those who are in celestial good, as being Divine truth (of which in what follows); they are said to be “filled with it” when what has been inscribed remains. The case herein is that those who are in the celestial kingdom of the Lord do not know truths from memory-knowledge, and the consequent faith; but from internal perception; for they are in the good of love from the Lord, and all truths have been ingrafted in this good. The good itself has been implanted in their will part, and the derivative truth in their intellectual part. With them the will part and the intellectual part act absolutely as a one, differently from those who are in the spiritual kingdom. From this it is that those who are in the celestial kingdom of the Lord do not from their intellectual part know truths, but perceive them; for the good that has been implanted in the will is presented in its quality and in its form in the understanding, and is there in a light as it were flaming. With them, truth is the form of good, and the quality of it, which is not seen but perceived, is from good. From this it is that they never dispute about truths, insomuch that when they discourse about truths, they say that it is so, or is not so, nothing further; for anything further is not from good. These are they who are meant in Matthew:
Let your discourse be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay; whatsoever is more than these is from evil (Matt. 5:37).
(That they who are in the celestial kingdom of the Lord are of this character, see n. 2715, 2718, 3246, 4448, 5113, 6367, 7877, 9166, 9543; what the difference is between those who are in the celestial kingdom, and those who are in the spiritual kingdom, may be seen in the places cited in n. 9276.)
sRef Isa@28 @6 S2′ sRef Isa@28 @5 S2′ [2] From all this it can now be seen what is meant by Divine truths being “inscribed.” The word “spirit” is used in many passages in the Word, and when said of man, by his “spirit” is signified the good and truth that have been inscribed on his intellectual part, consequently there is signified the life of this part. That when predicated of man, “spirit” has this signification, is because in respect to his interiors man is a spirit, and in respect to these is also in company with spirits. On this subject see what has been abundantly shown above, namely, that there are spirits and angels with man, and man is directed by the Lord by means of them (n. 50, 697, 986, 2796, 2886, 2887, 4047, 4048, 5846-5866, 5976-5993); that man is among spirits and angels such as he is himself (n. 4067, 4073, 4077, 4111); and that every man has a spirit through which his body has life (n. 4622).
[3] From this it can be known what is meant by “Spirit” when said of the Lord, namely, the Divine truth that proceeds from His Divine good, and that when this Divine truth flows in with man, and is received by him, it is “the Spirit of Truth,” “the Spirit of God,” and “the Holy Spirit;” for it flows in immediately from the Lord, and also mediately through angels and spirits (see the places cited in n. 9682); that “the Spirit of Truth,” “the Spirit of God,” and “the Holy Spirit,” denote this, will be seen in what follows. For it must first be shown that in the Word, “spirit,” when said of man, denotes the good and truth that has been inscribed on his intellectual part, consequently that it denotes the life of this. For there is the life of the intellectual part, and the life of the will part; the life of the intellectual part is to know, to see, and to understand, that truth is true, and that good is good; whereas the life of the will part is to will and to love truth for the sake of truth, and good for the sake of good. This latter life is called in the Word “heart;” but the former is called “spirit.”
sRef Zech@12 @1 S4′ sRef Ezek@36 @26 S4′ sRef Ezek@18 @31 S4′ [4] That such is the case is evident from the following passages in the Word:
Make for you a new heart and a new spirit; why will ye die, O house of Israel? (Ezek. 18:31).
I will give you a new heart, and I will put a new spirit in the midst of you (Ezek. 36:26);
“a new heart” denotes a new will; and “a new spirit,” a new understanding. In Zechariah:
Jehovah stretcheth forth the heavens, and layeth the foundation of the earth, and formeth the spirit of man in the midst of him (Zech. 12:1);
where “stretching forth the heavens, and laying the foundation of the earth” denotes a new church (that the church is meant by “heaven and earth,” see n. 1733, 1850, 2117, 2118, 3355, 4535); “to form the spirit of man in the midst of him” denotes to regenerate him in respect to the understanding of truth and good.
sRef Ps@51 @12 S5′ sRef Ps@51 @17 S5′ sRef Ps@78 @8 S5′ sRef Ps@51 @10 S5′ sRef Ps@51 @11 S5′ [5] In David:
Create in me a clean heart, O God; and renew a steadfast spirit in the midst of me. Cast me not away from before Thee, and take not the Spirit of Thy holiness from me. Restore unto me the joy of Thy salvation; and let an ingenuous spirit uphold me. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and a contrite heart God doth not despise (Ps. 51:10-12, 17);
“a clean heart” denotes a will that is averse to evils, which are unclean; “a steadfast spirit” denotes the understanding and faith of truth; “a broken spirit,” and “a broken heart,” denote a state of temptation and the consequent humiliation of the life of both of these. That “spirit” denotes life, is plain from each of the above expressions. The Divine truth, from which is this life, is “the Spirit of holiness.” Again:
A generation that maketh not its heart right, and whose spirit is not constant with God (Ps. 78:8);
“a heart not right” denotes that the will is not right; “a spirit not constant with God,” denotes that the understanding and faith are not constant.
sRef Isa@26 @9 S6′ sRef Isa@42 @5 S6′ sRef Ezek@21 @7 S6′ sRef Deut@2 @30 S6′ [6] In Moses:
Jehovah God made worse the spirit of Sihon king of Heshbon, and hardened his heart (Deut. 2:30);
in this passage also “spirit” and “heart” denote the two lives, which are said to be “hardened” when there is no will of understanding truth and good, nor of doing them. In Ezekiel:
Every heart shall melt, and all hands shall be let down, and every spirit shall be contracted (Ezek. 21:7);
where the meaning is similar. In Isaiah:
Jehovah, that giveth soul unto the people upon the earth, and spirit to them that walk therein (Isa. 42:5);
“giving soul to the people” denotes the life of faith (that “soul” denotes the life of faith, see n. 9050); and “giving spirit” denotes the understanding of truth. Again:
With my soul have I desired Thee in the night; yea, with my spirit in the midst of me have I awaited Thee in the morning (Isa. 26:9);
where the meaning is similar.
sRef Ezek@20 @32 S7′ sRef Matt@5 @3 S7′ sRef Isa@33 @11 S7′ sRef Ps@32 @2 S7′ sRef Ezek@13 @3 S7′ sRef Matt@26 @41 S7′ sRef Mal@2 @15 S7′ [7] Again:
Conceive ye refuse, bring forth stubble; your spirit the fire shall devour (Isa. 33:11).
“The spirit which the fire shall devour,” denotes the understanding of truth, thus intelligence; “fire” denotes evil affection, which being from evil destroys.
[8] Again in the following passages:
Woe to the foolish prophets that go away after their own spirit (Ezek. 13:3).
That which cometh up upon your spirit shall never come to pass (Ezek. 20:32).
Not one hath done so, and the rest who have the spirit: what therefore the one, seeking the seed of God? Therefore take heed by your spirit, that he may not deal treacherously against the wife of thy youth (Mal. 2:15).
Blessed is the man to whom Jehovah imputeth not iniquity, provided in his spirit there is no deceit (Ps. 32:2).
Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of the heavens (Matt. 5:3.)
Jesus said unto His disciples, Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation; the spirit indeed is ready, but the flesh is weak (Matt. 26:41).
It is very evident that in these passages by “spirit” is meant the very life of man; that it denotes the intellectual life, or the life of truth, can be seen from the fact that by “spirit” in the natural sense is meant the life of man’s respiration; and that the respiration of the lungs corresponds to the life of truth, which is the life of faith and from this of the understanding; while the beating of the heart corresponds to the life of the will, thus of the love. That there is this correspondence of the lungs and of the heart, see n. 3883-3896, 9300, 9495; from which it can be seen what life is meant in the spiritual sense by “spirit.”
sRef Ezek@37 @9 S9′ sRef Ps@104 @30 S9′ sRef Jer@10 @14 S9′ sRef Ezek@37 @1 S9′ sRef Ezek@37 @10 S9′ sRef Luke@8 @54 S9′ sRef Ezek@37 @5 S9′ sRef Luke@8 @55 S9′ sRef Rev@11 @7 S9′ sRef Rev@11 @11 S9′ sRef Job@17 @1 S9′ sRef Jer@51 @17 S9′ sRef Ps@104 @29 S9′ sRef Ps@143 @7 S9′ [9] That in a general sense “spirit” denotes the life of man’s respiration, is very plain in the following passages:
Thou hidest Thy face, they are troubled; Thou gatherest their spirit, they expire. Thou sendest forth Thy spirit, they are created (Ps. 104:29, 30).
Answer me, O Jehovah, my spirit hath been consumed; hide not Thy faces from me (Ps. 143:7).
My spirit hath been consumed, my days extinguished (Job 17:1).
Jesus, taking the hand of the maid that was dead, said, Maid arise. And so her spirit returned, and straightway she rose up (Luke 8:54, 55).
Every man is become foolish with knowledge, a graven image is a lie, and there is no spirit in it (Jer. 10:14; 51:17).
He carried me forth in the spirit of Jehovah, and set me in the midst of the valley. And there the Lord Jehovih said to the dry bones, Behold I bring spirit into you, that ye may live. Thus said the Lord Jehovih, Come from the four winds, O spirit, and breathe into these slain; and the spirit came into them, and they lived again (Ezek. 37:1, 5, 9, 10).
The two witnesses were slain by the beast that came up out of the abyss; but after three days and a half the spirit of life from God entered into them, that they should stand upon their feet (Rev. 11:7, 11).
sRef Dan@5 @12 S10′ sRef John@3 @34 S10′ sRef John@4 @24 S10′ sRef John@4 @23 S10′ sRef Luke@1 @80 S10′ sRef Luke@2 @40 S10′ sRef Dan@5 @14 S10′ [10] From these passages it is very manifest that “spirit” denotes the life of man. That specifically it denotes the life of truth, which is the life of man’s intellectual part, and is called intelligence, is clear in these passages:
The hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshipers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth. God is a spirit, therefore those who worship Him must worship in spirit and in truth (John 4:23, 24).
Forasmuch as an excellent spirit, both of knowledge and of understanding, was in him (Dan. 5:12, 14).
John grew, and waxed strong in spirit (Luke 1:80).
The child Jesus grew, and waxed strong in spirit, and was filled with wisdom (Luke 2:40).
He whom the Father hath sent speaketh the words of God; for God hath not given the spirit by measure to him (John 3:34).
“spirit” here denotes intelligence and wisdom; “speaking the words of God” denotes to speak Divine truths.
sRef John@3 @5 S11′ sRef John@3 @6 S11′ [11] From all this it is now evident what is signified by “spirit” in John:
Jesus said to Nicodemus, Except a man be born of water and of the spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God. That which hath been begotten of the flesh is flesh; and that which hath been begotten of the spirit is spirit (John 3:5-6);
where “to be begotten of water” denotes by means of truth; and “to be begotten of the spirit” denotes the consequent life from the Lord, which is called spiritual life. (That “water” denotes the truth through which is regeneration, see n. 2702, 3058, 3424, 4976, 5668, 9323; but “the flesh” denotes what is man’s own, in which there is nothing of spiritual life, n. 3813, 8409.)
sRef Isa@31 @3 S12′ sRef John@6 @63 S12′ [12] The like is signified by “spirit” and “flesh” in the same:
It is the spirit that maketh alive; the flesh profiteth nothing; the words that I speak to you are spirit, and are life (John 6:63);
“the words which the Lord spoke” are Divine truths, the life thence derived is “the spirit.” In Isaiah:
Egypt is man and not God; and his horses are flesh, and not spirit (Isa. 31:3);
“Egypt” denotes memory-knowledge in general; “his horses” denote memory-knowledge from the intellectual, which is called “flesh, and not spirit” when there is nothing of spiritual life therein. (That “Egypt” denotes memory-knowledge, see the places cited in n. 9340, 9391; that “horses” denote the intellectual, n. 2761, 2762, 3217, 5321; and that “the horses of Egypt” denote memory-knowledges from the intellectual, n. 6125, 8146, 8148.) He who does not know what is signified by “Egypt,” by “horses,” and also by “flesh” and “spirit,” cannot possibly know what these words involve.
sRef John@6 @63 S13′ [13] When it is known what is signified by “spirit” in regard to man, it can be known what is signified by “Spirit” when it is said of Jehovah or the Lord, to whom are attributed all things belonging to man; as face, eyes, ears, arms, hands, and also a heart and a soul; thus also a Spirit, which in the Word is called “the Spirit of God,” “the Spirit of Jehovah,” “the Spirit of His mouth,” “the Spirit of holiness,” or “the Holy Spirit.” That by the “Spirit” is meant the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, is evident from many passages in the Word. The reason why the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord is signified by “the Spirit of God,” is that the whole life of man is thence, and those have heavenly life who receive this Divine truth in faith and love. That this is “the Spirit of God,” the Lord Himself teaches in John:
The words that I speak to you are spirit, and are life (John 6:63);
“the words which the Lord spoke” are Divine truths.
sRef John@7 @39 S14′ sRef John@7 @37 S14′ sRef John@7 @38 S14′ [14] Again:
Jesus cried with a great voice, saying, If anyone thirst, let him come unto Me, and drink. Whosoever believeth in Me, as the Scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow streams of living water. This said He of the Spirit, which they that believe in Him should receive; for the Holy Spirit was not yet, because Jesus was not yet glorified (John 7:37-39);
that by “the Spirit which they that believe in the Lord were to receive” is meant the life which is from the Lord, and which is the life of faith and of love, is plain from the details of this passage; for “thirsting and drinking” signify a longing to know and perceive truth; “streams of living water which shall flow from the belly” denote truths Divine. From this it is evident that “the Spirit which they should receive,” which is also called “the Holy Spirit,” denotes life from the Divine truth which proceeds from the Lord, which life (as just said) is called “the life of faith and of love,” and is the very spiritual and celestial life with man. The reason why it is said that “the Holy Spirit was not yet, because Jesus was not yet glorified,” is that while the Lord was in the world He Himself taught Divine truth; but when He was glorified, which was after the resurrection, He taught it through angels and spirits. This holy thing which proceeds from the Lord, and flows into man through angels and spirits, whether manifestly or not manifestly, is “the Holy Spirit” there mentioned; for it is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord that is called “holy” in the Word (see n. 9680).
sRef John@16 @14 S15′ sRef John@20 @21 S15′ sRef John@20 @22 S15′ sRef John@16 @13 S15′ [15] From this it is that the Holy Spirit is called “the Spirit of Truth,” and that it is said that “He will lead into all truth;” and that “He shall not speak of Himself, but what things soever He shall hear from the Lord;” and that “He shall receive from the Lord the things that He will proclaim” (John 16:13, 14); and also that when the Lord departed from the disciples, “He breathed into them, and said, Receive ye the Holy Spirit” (John 20:21, 22). The respiration signifies the life of faith (n. 9229, 9281); consequently the inspiration [or breathing] of the Lord signifies a capability imparted to men to perceive Divine truths, and thus to receive the life of faith; whence also comes the word “spirit” from “blowing” and from “wind,” because from the respiration; and therefore spirit is sometimes called “wind.” That the respiration of the lungs corresponds to the life of faith, and the beating of the heart to the life of love, see n. 3883-3896, 9300, 9495.)
sRef Job@4 @9 S16′ sRef Gen@2 @7 S16′ sRef Lam@4 @20 S16′ sRef Ps@33 @6 S16′ sRef John@1 @14 S16′ sRef Ps@18 @15 S16′ sRef John@1 @3 S16′ sRef John@1 @1 S16′ [16] The like is signified by “inspiration” [or “breathing into”] in the book of Genesis:
And Jehovah breathed into man’s nostrils the soul of lives (Gen. 2:7).
From this the Lord is called “the spirit of our nostrils” (Lam. 4:20). And as Divine truth consumes and vastates the evil, it is said in the following passages:
The foundations of the world were revealed at the blast of the spirit of Thy nostrils (Ps. 18:15).
By the breath of God they perish, and by the spirit of His nostrils are they consumed (Job 4:9).
By the word of Jehovah were the heavens made, and all the army of them by the spirit of His mouth (Ps. 33:6);
“the word of Jehovah” denotes Divine truth; in like manner “the spirit of His mouth.” That this denotes the Lord is evident in John:
In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and God was the Word. All things were made by Him. And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us (John 1:1, 3, 14).

sRef Isa@11 @1 S17′ sRef Isa@42 @1 S17′ sRef Isa@11 @2 S17′ [17] That Divine truth, from which is the heavenly life of man, is signified by “the Holy Spirit,” is plain also from the following passages. In Isaiah:
There shall go forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse; and the spirit of Jehovah shall rest upon him, the spirit of wisdom and intelligence, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of Jehovah (Isa. 11:1-2);
these words are said of the Lord, in whom Divine truth, consequently Divine wisdom and intelligence, are called “the Spirit of Jehovah;” and this Spirit is called “the spirit of wisdom and intelligence, of counsel, of might, and of knowledge.” Again:
I have put My Spirit upon Him; he shall bring forth judgment to the nations (Isa. 42:1);
speaking here also of the Lord; “the Spirit of Jehovah upon Him” denotes Divine truth, consequently Divine wisdom and intelligence. Divine truth is also called “judgment” (n. 2235).
sRef Isa@61 @1 S18′ sRef Isa@59 @19 S18′ [18] Again:
When the enemy shall come as a pent-up stream, the spirit of Jehovah shall lift up a standard against him (Isa. 59:19).
The spirit of the Lord Jehovih is upon Me; therefore Jehovah hath anointed Me to preach glad tidings to the poor (Isa. 61:1);
speaking here also of the Lord; the Divine truth which was in the Lord while He was in the world, and which He Himself then was is “the Spirit of Jehovah.”
sRef Isa@32 @15 S19′ sRef Isa@32 @16 S19′ [19] That “the Spirit of Jehovah” denotes Divine truth, and that the man who receives it has heavenly life therefrom is still more evident from the following passages. In Isaiah:
Until the spirit be poured upon you from on high, then shall the wilderness become a fruitful field; then judgment shall dwell in the wilderness (Isa. 32:15, 16);
the subject here treated of is regeneration; “the spirit from on high” denotes life from the Divine; for “the wilderness becoming a fruitful field,” and “judgment dwelling in the wilderness,” signifies intelligence where there was none before, thus new life.
sRef Isa@44 @3 S20′ sRef Joel@2 @28 S20′ sRef Ezek@39 @29 S20′ sRef Ezek@37 @14 S20′ sRef Ezek@37 @13 S20′ sRef Micah@3 @8 S20′ sRef Joel@2 @29 S20′ sRef Zech@6 @8 S20′ [20] In like manner in these passages:
That ye may know that I will give My spirit in you, that ye may live (Ezek. 37:13, 14).
Then I will not hide My faces any more from them; for I will pour out My spirit upon the house of Israel (Ezek. 39:29).
I will pour out My spirit upon all flesh, and upon the manservants and upon the maidservants in those days will I pour out My spirit (Joel 2:28, 29).
I am full of might with the spirit of Jehovah, and with judgment and strength to declare to Jacob his transgression, and to Israel his sin (Micah 3:8).
The horses that go forth into the land of the north have quieted my spirit in the land of the north (Zech. 6:8).
I will pour waters upon him that is thirsty, and streams upon the dry land; I will pour out My spirit upon thy seed (Isa. 44:3).
That in these passages “the Spirit of Jehovah” denotes the Divine truth, and through this the life of faith and of love, is evident; that it flows in immediately from the Lord and also mediately from Him through spirits and angels, may be seen above (n. 9682).
[21] In like manner in another passage in Isaiah:
In that day shall Jehovah Zebaoth be for a crown of ornament and for a diadem of beauty to the remains of His people; and for a spirit of judgment to him that sitteth upon judgment, and for strength to them (Isa. 28:5, 6);
where “a crown of ornament” denotes the wisdom which is of good; “a diadem of beauty,” the intelligence which is of truth; and “a spirit of judgment,” Divine truth, for judgment is predicated of truth (n. 2235, 6397, 7206, 8685, 8695, 9260, 9383).
sRef Isa@63 @9 S22′ sRef Isa@63 @11 S22′ sRef Isa@63 @14 S22′ sRef Isa@63 @10 S22′ sRef Rev@19 @10 S22′ [22] Again:
The Angel of the faces of Jehovah delivered them; in His love and in His pity He redeemed them; yet they rebelled, and embittered the Spirit of His Holiness; whereby He was turned to be their enemy. He put the Spirit of His Holiness in the midst of him; the Spirit of Jehovah led him (Isa. 63:9-11, 14);
here “the Spirit of holiness” denotes the Lord as to Divine truth, thus the Divine truth which is from the Lord; “the N. Angel of His faces” denotes the Lord as to Divine good, for “the face of Jehovah” denotes love, mercy, and good. In Revelation:
The testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy (Rev. 19:10);
“the testimony of Jesus” denotes the Divine truth which is from Him and concerning Him (n. 9503).
sRef Matt@3 @11 S23′ sRef Ps@104 @4 S23′ [23] In David:
Jehovah God maketh His angels spirits; and His ministers a flaming fire (Ps. 104:4);
where “making the angels spirits” denotes receptions of Divine truth; and “making them a flaming fire” denotes receptions of Divine good, that is, of Divine love. In Matthew:
John said, I baptize you with water unto repentance; but He that cometh after me shall baptize you with the Holy Spirit and with fire (Matt. 3:11);
where “to baptize” denotes to regenerate; “with the Holy Spirit” denotes by means of Divine truth; and “with fire” denotes from the Divine good of the Divine love. (That “to baptize” denotes to regenerate, see n. 5120, 9088; and that “fire” denotes the Divine good of the Divine love, n. 4906, 5215, 6314, 6832, 6834, 4849, 7324.)
sRef Rev@4 @5 S24′ sRef Luke@11 @13 S24′ sRef Rev@5 @6 S24′ [24] In Luke:
If ye, being evil, know how to give good things to your children; how much more shall the Father who is in Heaven give the Holy Spirit to them that ask Him? (Luke 11:13);
“to give the Holy Spirit” denotes to enlighten with Divine truth, and to endow with the life thence derived, which is the life of intelligence and wisdom. In Revelation:
The seven lamps of fire burning before the throne are the seven Spirits of God (Rev. 4:5).
In the midst of the elders a Lamb standing, having seven horns, and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God, sent forth into all the earth (Rev. 5:6).
That in these passages “Spirits” do not mean spirits, is evident from the fact that the lamps and the eyes of the Lamb are called “the Spirits of God;” for “lamps” denote Divine truths (n. 4638, 7072), and “eyes” denote the understanding of truth, and when said of the Lord, the Divine intelligence and wisdom (n. 2701, 4403-4421, 4523-4534, 9051); from which it is evident that “the Spirits of God” signify Divine truths.
sRef John@14 @26 S25′ sRef John@14 @16 S25′ sRef John@14 @18 S25′ sRef John@14 @17 S25′ [25] When therefore it is known that “the Holy Spirit” denotes the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, which is holiness itself, the Divine meaning of the Word can be known wherever mention is made of “the Spirit of God,” and “the Holy Spirit;” as in the following passages:
I will ask the Father that He may give you another Paraclete, that He may abide with you forever; the Spirit of Truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth Him not, neither knoweth Him; but ye know Him, for He abideth with you, and shall be in you. I will not leave you orphans. The Paraclete, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He shall teach you all things, and put you in mind of all things that I have said unto you (John 14:16-18, 26).
When the Paraclete shall come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, the Spirit of Truth, who goeth forth from the Father, He shall bear witness of Me; and ye shall bear witness (John 15:26, 27).
I tell you the truth; it is expedient for you that I go away; if I go not away, the Paraclete will not come unto you; but if I go away, I will send Him unto you (John 16:7).
sRef John@16 @7 S26′ sRef John@15 @26 S26′ sRef John@15 @27 S26′ [26] From these passages it is again evident that the Divine truth proceeding from the Divine good which is “the Father,” is “the Paraclete,” and “the Holy Spirit,” and therefore also He is called “the Spirit of Truth;” and it is said of Him that “He shall abide in them,” that “He shall teach all things,” that “He shall bear witness of the Lord.” In the spiritual sense “to bear witness of the Lord” denotes to teach about Him. Its being said that “the Paraclete who is the Holy Spirit is sent from the Father in the name of the Lord,” and again that “the Lord will send Him from the Father,” and afterward that “the Lord Himself will send Him,” is because the Father signifies the Divine Itself which is in the Lord, and consequently that the Father and He are one, as the Lord plainly declares in John 10:30; 14:9-11.
sRef Matt@12 @32 S27′ sRef Matt@12 @31 S27′ [27] Again:
All sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men; but the blasphemy of the Spirit shall not be forgiven unto men. If anyone shall say a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him; but whosoever shall speak against the Holy Spirit, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this age, nor in that which is to come (Matt. 12:31, 32);
“to say a word against the Son of man” denotes against truth Divine not yet implanted or inscribed in the life of man (that “the Son of man” denotes the Divine truth, see n. 9807); but “to speak against the Holy Spirit” denotes against the Divine truth that has been implanted or inscribed in the life of man, especially against the Divine truth about the Lord Himself. To speak against this, that is, to deny it after it has once been acknowledged, is profanation; and the profanation is of such a nature that it utterly destroys the interiors of man; and from this it is said that this sin cannot be forgiven. (What profanation is, see n. 3398, 3898, 4289, 4601, 6348, 6959, 6963, 6971, 8394, 8882, 9298.)
sRef John@14 @9 S28′ sRef John@14 @10 S28′ sRef Matt@28 @19 S28′ sRef John@14 @7 S28′ [28] And again:
Jesus said unto the disciples, Go ye, and baptize in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit (Matt. 28:19);
“the Father” here denotes the Divine Itself; “the Son” denotes this Divine Itself in a human form; and “the Holy Spirit” denotes the Divine which proceeds. Thus there is one Divine, and yet a Trinity. That the Lord is the Divine Itself under a human form, He Himself teaches in John:
From henceforth ye have known the Father, and have seen Him; he that seeth Me seeth the Father; I am in the Father, and the Father in Me (John 14:7, 9-10).

AC (Potts) n. 9819 sRef Ex@28 @3 S0′ 9819. And they shall make Aaron’s garments. That this signifies through whom is the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the signification of “Aaron’s garments,” as being a representative of the spiritual kingdom of the Lord joined to His celestial kingdom (of which above, n. 9814). That the wise in heart, filled with the spirit of wisdom, were to make the garments, was because by them are meant those who are in the celestial kingdom; and the spiritual kingdom is that which is from the celestial, and thus covers it, as a garment covers the body (as can also be seen from what was said above, n. 9818).

AC (Potts) n. 9820 sRef Ex@28 @3 S0′ 9820. To sanctify him. That this signifies thereby a representative of the Divine truth in this kingdom, is evident from the signification of “to be sanctified,” as being to be imbued with Divine truth from the Lord; for the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord is what is called “holy” in the Word, for the reason that the Lord alone is holy, thus whatever proceeds from Him (see n. 9680). From this it is that the holiness which proceeds from Him is called “the Holy Spirit” (as shown just above, n. 9818, and on which subject see also what was adduced in the passages cited in n. 9229).
[2] From this it is plain how it is to be understood that angels, prophets, and apostles are called “holy” (“holy angels” in Matt. 25:31; Mark 8:38; Luke 9:26; “holy prophets” in Rev. 16:6; 18:20; and “holy apostles” in Rev. 18:20), that is, not that they were holy from themselves, but from the Lord; “holy angels” because these are receptions of the Divine truth which is from the Lord, and therefore by them in the Word are signified truths Divine, and in general something of the Lord (n. 1925, 2821, 4085, 4295); “holy prophets” because by these is signified the Word which is Divine truth, and specifically doctrines derived from the Word (n. 2534, 3652, 7269); and “holy apostles” because by these is signified all the truth of faith and all the good of love in the complex (n. 3488, 3858, 6397).
sRef John@17 @17 S3′ sRef John@17 @19 S3′ [3] That the Divine truth which proceeds from the Lord is holiness itself, thus the Lord, from whom is this holiness, is evident from many passages in the Word, of which may now be adduced only the words of the Lord in John:
Father, sanctify them in Thy truth; Thy Word is truth. For their sakes I sanctify Myself, that they also may be sanctified in the truth (John 17:17, 19);
from this it is evident that it is the Lord who sanctifies man, spirit, and angel, because He alone is holy (Rev. 15:4), and that they are holy only insofar as they receive of the Lord, that is, insofar as they receive from Him of faith and love to Him.

AC (Potts) n. 9821 sRef Ex@28 @3 S0′ 9821. To his ministering in the priest’s office to Me. That this signifies a representative of the Lord, is evident from what was shown above (n. 9809).

AC (Potts) n. 9822 sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9822. And these are the garments which they shall make. That this signifies Divine truths in the spiritual kingdom in their order, is evident from the signification of “Aaron’s garments,” as being the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom (see above, n. 9814). That these garments denote Divine truths in this kingdom, is because “garments” signify truths (n. 5954, 9212, 9216), and because this kingdom is called the spiritual kingdom from the Divine truths which are there. For there are two kingdoms into which heaven is distinguished, the celestial kingdom and the spiritual kingdom; in the celestial kingdom good reigns, and in the spiritual kingdom truth, both from the Lord; and because the garments of Aaron represented the latter kingdom, and these garments were an ephod, a robe, and a tunic, therefore by these are signified Divine truths in this kingdom in their order.

AC (Potts) n. 9823 sRef Ex@28 @30 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @29 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9823. A breastplate. That this signifies Divine truth shining forth from Divine good, is evident from the signification of “the breastplate,” as being Divine truth shining forth from Divine good, here in ultimates progressively from the inmost things in the heavens. For the ephod, on which was this breastplate, represented the ultimates of the spiritual kingdom, and consequently the ultimates of heaven. “The breast plate” had this signification because it was fastened upon the breast where the heart is, and was filled with precious stones, and the heart corresponds to celestial good, which is the good of love to the Lord from the Lord, and the twelve precious stones correspond to Divine truths thence derived. Hence by “the breastplate” in the supreme sense is signified Divine truth shining forth from the Divine good of the Lord. (That the heart corresponds to celestial good, that is, to the good of love to the Lord from the Lord, see n. 170, 172, 176, 3635, 3883-3896, 7542, 9050, 9300, 9495; and that the twelve precious stones correspond to Divine truths which are from the Divine good, will be seen in what follows in this chapter, where this breastplate is fully described, and is called “the breastplate of judgment,” and “the Urim and Thummim,” from the twelve precious stones with which it was filled.) That it was fastened upon the breast where is the heart, is evident from the description given of it below, where this is plainly stated in these words, “Aaron shall carry the names of the sons of Israel in the breastplate of judgment upon his heart” (verse 29); and again, “They shall be upon Aaron’s heart, when he goeth in before Jehovah; and Aaron shall carry the judgment of the sons of Israel upon his heart before Jehovah continually” (verse 30). That “judgment” also denotes the Divine truth which proceeds from the Divine good of the Lord, will be seen in what follows.

AC (Potts) n. 9824 sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9824. And an ephod. That this signifies Divine truth in this kingdom in the external form in which interior things cease, is evident from the signification of “the ephod,” as being Divine truth in an external form. The reason why this is signified by “the ephod” is that by Aaron’s garments of holiness were represented Divine truths in the spiritual kingdom in their order (see above, n. 9522); and the ephod was the outermost of three garments; Aaron’s garments for the priest’s office being the ephod, the robe, and the checkered tunic. That which is outermost not only contains the interior things, but the interior things also cease in it. This is the case in the human body, and consequently also in the heavens, to which the things of the human body correspond. The case is similar with truths and goods, for these make the heavens.
[2] As the ephod represented the outermost of the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, it was more holy than the rest of the garments, and on it was the breastplate, in which were the Urim and Thummim, through which answers were given by the Divine. That what is most external is more holy than the internal things, is because the external holds all the interior things in their order, and in their form and connection, insomuch that if the external were removed, the internal things would be dispersed; for internal things not only cease in the external, but they are also together in it. That this is so can be known to those who know how it is with things successive and things simultaneous; namely, that successive things, which proceed and follow one another in their order, are nevertheless presented together in the ultimate things. Take for example, end, cause, and effect; the end is the first in order, the cause is the second, and the effect is the ultimate. So also do they advance in succession. Nevertheless the cause is presented simultaneously in the effect, which is the ultimate; and the end is so presented in the cause. Consequently the effect is the completion, in which the interior or prior things are collected together and are lodged.
[3] The case is similar in man, with will, thought, and action. To will comes first, to think second, and to do is the ultimate, and this is also the effect in which the prior or interior things come forth in simultaneous order. For insofar as the act contains within itself that which the man is thinking, and that which he is willing, so far the interior things are held together in their form and in their connection. It is from this that it is said in the Word, that man will be judged according to his deeds, or according to his works, which means that he will be judged according to his thought and will, for these are in his deeds as the soul is in his body. As then the interior things are presented simultaneously in the ultimate, it follows that, as already said, if the order is perfect, the ultimate is accounted more holy than the interior things, for therein is complete the holiness of the interior things.
[4] As the interior things are together in the ultimate ones (as for instance, as just said, man’s thought and will are together in his deeds or works; or in regard to spiritual things, his faith and love are so), therefore John was beloved by the Lord more than the rest of the disciples, and lay on His breast (John 13:23; 21:20, 22), for the reason that this disciple represented the works of charity. (See the prefaces to Genesis 18 and 22, and also n. 3934.) From this it is also evident why the external or ultimate which is in perfect order, is more holy than the internal things regarded singly; for when the Lord is in the ultimate, He is simultaneously in all things, and when He is in this, the interior things are held together in their order, connection, and form; and under super-vision and guidance at His good pleasure. This is the secret which is meant in n. 9360, which see.
aRef Ex@29 @5 S5′ sRef Hos@3 @4 S5′ [5] This then is the reason why the ephod, being a representative of the ultimate in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, was accounted more holy than the rest of the garments of the priesthood. Wherefore the ephod was the chief priestly vestment, and was made of threads of gold in the midst of blue, of crimson, of scarlet double-dyed, and of fine twined linen (Exod. 39:3); but the rest of the priests had ephods of linen (1 Sam. 2:18; 22:18). On this account also the ephod stood for all the vestments of a priest, and he was said “to wear the ephod,” whereby was signified that he was a priest (1 Sam. 2:28; 14:3). On this account also the breastplate was fastened to the ephod, and answers were given by means of the Urim and Thummim thereon, for the reason that this vestment was a representative of the ultimate in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom; and Divine answers are presented in ultimates, for they pass through all the interior things in succession, and are there dictated, because there they cease. That answers were given when the priests were clothed with the ephod, is evident from 1 Samuel 23:6-13; 30:7, 8; and also in Hosea:
The sons of Israel tarried many days without king, and without prince, and without sacrifice, and without pillar, and without ephod, and teraphim (Hos. 3:4);
where “teraphim” signify Divine answers, for answers were formerly given by means of these (Zech. 10:2). Moreover, in the original tongue the word “ephod” comes from “to enclose all the interior things,” as is evident from the meaning of the word in Exodus 29:5; Leviticus 8:7.

AC (Potts) n. 9825 sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9825. And a robe. That this signifies Divine truth there in the internal form, is evident from the signification of “the robe,” as being the middle of the spiritual kingdom, thus the truth itself which is there; for by Aaron’s garments was represented the Lord’s spiritual kingdom (n. 9814), thus the truths which are there, in their order (see n. 9822); and as this kingdom has been distinguished into three degrees, the inmost, the middle, and the external, therefore by “the robe” was signified that which is in the middle of this kingdom. The reason why this kingdom has been distinguished into three degrees, is that the inmost there communicates with the celestial, and the external with the natural, and therefore the middle partakes equally of both. Moreover, in order that anything may be perfect, it must be distinguished into three degrees. This is the case with heaven, and with the goods and the truths in it. That there are three heavens is known; consequently there are three degrees of goods and truths there. Each heaven also is distinguished into three degrees; for its inmost must communicate immediately with what is higher, and its external with what is lower, and so, through these, its middle must communicate with both, whence comes its perfection. The case is the same with the interiors of man, which in general have been distinguished into three degrees, namely, into the celestial, the spiritual, and the natural; in like manner each of these into its own three degrees; for a man who is in the good of faith and of love to the Lord is a heaven in the least form corresponding to the greatest (n. 9279). Such also is the case in all things of nature. (That the natural of man has been distinguished into three degrees, see n. 4570, and in general all his interior and exterior things, n. 4154.) The reason of its being so is that everywhere there must be end, cause, and effect; the end must be the inmost, the cause the middle, and the effect the ultimate, in order that the thing may be perfect. It is from this that in the Word “three” signifies what is complete from beginning to end (n. 2788, 4495, 7715, 9198, 9488, 9489). From all this it can be known why Aaron’s garments of holiness were an ephod, a robe, and a tunic; and that the ephod represented the external, the robe the middle, and the tunic the inmost, of the spiritual kingdom.
sRef 1Sam@24 @11 S2′ sRef 1Sam@24 @5 S2′ sRef 1Sam@15 @28 S2′ sRef 1Sam@18 @4 S2′ sRef 1Sam@24 @4 S2′ sRef 1Sam@18 @3 S2′ sRef 1Sam@15 @27 S2′ sRef 1Sam@24 @20 S2′ [2] As the robe represented the middle in the spiritual kingdom, and the middle partakes of both the others, it is taken representatively for that kingdom itself, as in the first book of Samuel:
Samuel turned about to go away, but Saul laid hold upon the skirt of his robe, and it was rent; wherefore Samuel said, Jehovah shall rend the kingdom of Israel from upon thee this day, and shall give it to thy companion who is better than thou (1 Sam. 15:27, 28);
from these words it is evident that “the rending of the skirt of Samuel’s robe” signified the rending of the kingdom of Israel from Saul, for “the kingdom of Israel” signifies the Lord’s spiritual kingdom (n. 4286, 4598, 6424, 6637, 6862, 6868, 7035, 7062, 7198, 7201, 7215, 7223, 8805). In like manner in the same:
David cut off the skirt of Saul’s robe privily; and when he showed it to Saul, Saul said, Now I know that reigning thou shalt reign, and the kingdom of Israel shall continue in thine hand (1 Sam. 24:4, 5, 11, 20).
When Jonathan made a covenant with David, he stripped himself of his robe, and gave it to David, even to his sword, to his bow, and to his girdle (1 Sam. 18:3, 4);
by which was represented that Jonathan, who was the heir, abdicated the kingdom of Israel and transferred it to David.
aRef Ex@28 @32 S3′ aRef Ex@28 @34 S3′ sRef Matt@23 @5 S3′ aRef Ex@28 @33 S3′ sRef Ezek@26 @16 S3′ aRef Ex@28 @35 S3′ aRef Ex@28 @31 S3′ [3] As a robe represented the spiritual kingdom, so likewise it represented the truths of this kingdom in general. The truths of this kingdom are what are called spiritual truths, which are in the intellectual part of man. These are signified by “robes” in Ezekiel:
All the princes of the sea shall come down from upon their thrones, and shall cast away their robes, and put off the garments of their embroidery (Ezek. 26:16);
this is said of Tyre, by which are signified the knowledges of good and truth (n. 1201); the vastation of these in the church is here described; “the robes which they shall cast away” denote the truths of faith which are in the intellectual part; but “the garments of embroidery” denote the memory-knowledges which are in the natural (n. 9688). The reason why these truths are signified, is that the truth which belongs to the understanding reigns in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom; but in the celestial kingdom the good which belongs to the will. In Matthew:
The scribes and Pharisees do all their works to be seen of men, and enlarge the borders of their robes (Matt. 23:5);
where “enlarging the borders of the robes” denotes to speak truths grandiloquently, merely to be heard and seen by men. That such things are signified by “the robe,” will be seen still better from the description of it below in this chapter (verses 31-35).

AC (Potts) n. 9826 sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9826. And a tunic of checker work. That this signifies Divine truth there inmostly proceeding immediately from the Divine celestial, is evident from the signification of “a tunic,” as being natural truth; but when said concerning Aaron, whose garments represented the truths of the Lord’s spiritual kingdom (see n. 9814, 9822), “the tunic” denotes the inmost Divine truth in this kingdom, thus that which proceeds most nearly from the Divine celestial, which is the Lord’s Divine good in the inmost heaven (that such things are signified by “tunics,” see n. 4677). For there are three heavens-the inmost which is called celestial, the middle which is called spiritual, and the ultimate which approaches what is natural. In the inmost heaven reigns the good of love to the Lord, in the middle heaven the good of charity toward the neighbor, and in the ultimate heaven the good of faith. These heavens are most distinct one from another, insomuch that he who is in one heaven cannot possibly pass into another; and yet they are one heaven, being joined together by means of intermediate angelic societies; and in this way one heaven proceeds from another. As therefore the garments of Aaron represent the spiritual heaven, and thus the truths of this heaven in their order, it is evident that by the inmost garment, which is called “a tunic of checker work,” is represented the inmost truth there which proceeds immediately from the Divine celestial. It is said to be “of checker work,” because it was woven, as is evident from what follows in the book of Exodus:
They made tunics of fine linen, the work of the weaver, for Aaron, and for his sons (Exod. 39:27);
that the tunics were of fine linen was in order that truth from a celestial origin might be represented. (That such truth is signified by “fine linen,” see n. 9469.)

AC (Potts) n. 9827 sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9827. And a miter. That this signifies intelligence and wisdom, is evident from the signification of “a miter,” as being intelligence and wisdom. A “miter” has this signification because it is a covering for the head, and by “the head” are signified the interior things of man that belong to intelligence and wisdom (see n. 9656). All articles of clothing derive their signification from the part of the body which they cover; as for instance that which covers the breast, like the breastplate; that which covers the loins, like the breeches; that which covers the feet, like the stockings; that which covers the soles of the feet, like the shoes; and so likewise that which covers the head, like the miter, the tiara, the cap.
[2] That such is the case is evident from the representatives in the other life. When wisdom and intelligence are taken away from spirits, as is the case when angelic societies are removed from them, the covering of the head appears to be taken away from them; and as soon as this is done they become stupid, and have no perception of truth and good; but afterward, as intelligence and wisdom return, the head is again covered. But in that life the coverings of the head do not so much signify the wisdom which is of good, as the intelligence which is of truth. The miter which belonged to Aaron, however, signifies wisdom also, because it was of fine linen, and the crown of holiness was placed upon it, which was a plate of pure gold, on which was engraven “Holiness to Jehovah” (of which below in this chapter, verses 36-38; and also in Exod. 29:6; 39:28). But “the miter of linen,” and the other garments of linen, which also were for Aaron, signified the intelligence that is of truth; but not the wisdom that is of good (concerning these garments and this miter, see Lev. 16:4; Ezek. 44:18). For “linen” signifies truth in man’s natural (n. 7601); thus a “miter of linen” denotes natural intelligence.
[3] They who do not know how the case is with representatives and correspondences, can with difficulty be led to believe that such things are signified. But let them consider that in heaven spiritual things are perceived in the place of natural things; thus that in place of the miter, and in general in place of garments, such things are perceived as belong to intelligence and wisdom, and also to faith and love; in general such things as belong to truth and good; for all these are spiritual things, because heaven is a spiritual world. Let them consider also that the garments of Aaron were described and commanded by Jehovah on Mount Sinai, and that therefore within every detail there is the Divine celestial, and this is unfolded solely by means of knowledges about correspondences and representatives.

AC (Potts) n. 9828 sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9828. And a belt. That this signifies a general bond in order that all things may look to one end, is evident from the signification of a “belt,” or “girdle,” as being a general bond; for it gathers up, encloses, holds in connection, and secures all the interior things, which without it would be set loose, and would be scattered. That “the belt” denotes a general bond to the intent that all things may look to one end, is because in the spiritual world the end reigns, insomuch that all things there may be called “ends;” for the Lord’s kingdom, which is a spiritual world, is a kingdom of uses, and uses there are ends; thus it is a kingdom of ends. But the ends there follow one another and are also associated together in a varied order; the ends which follow one another being called “intermediate ends,” but the ends which are associated together being called “consociate ends.” All these ends have been so mutually conjoined and subordinated that they look to one end, which is the universal end of them all. This end is the Lord; and in heaven with those who are receptive, it is love and faith in Him. Love is there the end of all their wills, and faith is the end of all their thoughts, these being of the understanding.
[2] When each and all things look to one end, they are then kept in an unbroken connection, and make a one; for they are under the view, the government, and the providence of One who bends all to Himself in accordance with the laws of subordination and consociation, and thus conjoins them with Himself; and also at the same time bends them to their companions in a reciprocal manner, and in this way conjoins them with each other. From this it is that the faces of all in heaven are kept turned to the Lord, who is the Sun there, and is thus the center to which all look; and this, wonderful to say, in whatever direction the angels may turn (see n. 3638). And as the Lord is in the good of mutual love, and in the good of charity toward the neighbor-for He loves all, and through love conjoins all-therefore the angels are also turned to the Lord by regarding their companions from this love.
sRef Jer@13 @6 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @7 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @4 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @9 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @3 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @2 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @1 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @8 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @10 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @11 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @12 S3′ sRef Jer@13 @5 S3′ [3] For this reason those things which are in ultimates, and which gather up and enclose, in order that each and all things may be kept together in such a connection, were represented by belts or girdles; which in the spiritual world are nothing else than goods and truths in the ultimates, or in the extremes, and which enclose the interior things. By the girdles around the loins were represented celestial goods, and by the girdles around the thighs, and also around the breast, were represented spiritual goods and truths in the ultimates or extremes.
sRef Isa@11 @5 S4′ [4] Such things are signified by “the girdles of the loins” in the following passage:
Jehovah said unto the prophet, Buy thee a linen girdle, and put it upon thy loins; but thou shalt not draw it through water. So I bought a girdle, and put it upon my loins. Then the word of Jehovah was made unto me, saying, Take the girdle, and go to Euphrates, and hide it in a hole of the rock. At the end of many days I went to Euphrates, and took again the girdle, and behold it was corrupt, it was profitable for nothing. Then said Jehovah, This evil people, who refuse to hear My words, and are gone after other gods, shall be even as this girdle, which is profitable for nothing (Jer. 13:1-10).
In the spiritual sense by “the linen girdle” is here meant the good of the church, which encloses and holds together in connection the truths in it. Because the good of the church was at that time non-existent, and the truths were consequently dispersed, it is said that it should “not be drawn through water;” for “water” denotes the truth which purifies and thus restores. “The hole of the rock in which the girdle was hid” denotes truth falsified; “the Euphrates” denotes the extension and boundary of the celestial things of good in their ultimate. He who does not know the nature of the Word, may suppose that this is only a comparison of the people and their corruption with the girdle and its corruption; but in the Word all comparisons and metaphorical sayings are real correspondences (n. 3579, 8989). Unless everything in this passage had a correspondence, it would never have been commanded that the girdle should not be drawn through water, that it should be put upon the loins, and that the prophet should go to the Euphrates, and should hide it there in a hole of the rock. It is said that the girdle should be “put upon the loins,” because from correspondence “the loins” signify the good of celestial love (n. 3021, 4280, 5050-5062); thus the placing of the girdle upon the loins denotes conjunction with the Lord through the good of love by the mediation of the Word.
sRef Ex@12 @11 S5′ sRef Rev@15 @6 S5′ sRef Isa@11 @1 S5′ [5] That a “girdle” denotes good bounding and conjoining is plain also in Isaiah:
There shall go forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse; righteousness shall be the girdle of His loins, and truth the girdle of His thighs (Isa. 11:1, 5);
this is said of the Lord; “the righteousness that shall be the girdle of the loins” denotes the good of His love which protects heaven and the church. It is said of the sons of Israel that when they ate the passover, “their loins were to be girded” (Exod. 12:11); which signifies that thus all things were in order, and prepared to receive good from the Lord, and were ready for action (n. 7863). It is from this that those who are ready are said to be “girded,” as is said also of the seven angels in Revelation:
There went forth from the temple the seven angels that had the seven plagues, clothed in linen white and shining, and girt about the breast with golden girdles (Rev. 15:6).
sRef 2Ki@1 @8 S6′ sRef Matt@3 @4 S6′ [6] It is said of Elijah:
He was a hairy man, and girt with a girdle of leather about his loins (2 Kings 1:8);
and in like manner of John:
John had clothing of camel’s hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins (Matt. 3:4).
Elijah and John were so clothed and girded because they both represented the Word; and therefore their garments denote the Word in the external sense which is natural; for “the hair” denotes the natural (n. 3301, 5247, 5569-5573). “Camels” denote general memory-knowledges in the natural (n. 3048, 3071, 3143, 3145); “leather” and “skin” signify what is external (n. 3540); thus a “leathern girdle” signifies that which gathers up, encloses, and holds together in connection, the interior things. (That Elijah represented the Word, see the preface to Genesis 18, and n. 2762, 5247; and in like manner John the Baptist, n. 9372.)
sRef Isa@3 @24 S7′ sRef 1Ki@2 @5 S7′ [7] As truths and goods are set loose and are dispersed by evil deeds, it is said of Joab after he had slain Abner with deceit, that “he put the bloods of war in his girdle that was on his loins” (1 Kings 2:5), by which is signified that he had dispersed and destroyed these things; and therefore when truths have been dispersed and destroyed, it is said that “instead of a girdle there shall be a rent, and instead of a work of entwining, baldness” (Isa. 3:24); speaking of the daughters of Zion, by whom are signified the goods that belong to the celestial church; “a rent instead of a girdle” denotes the dispersion of celestial good.
sRef Ezek@23 @15 S8′ sRef Ezek@23 @14 S8′ sRef Ezek@23 @16 S8′ [8] It is also said of Oholibah, which is Jerusalem, in Ezekiel:
When she saw men portrayed upon the wall, the images of the Chaldeans portrayed with vermilion, girded with girdles on their loins, she doted upon them (Ezek. 23:14-16);
by which are signified truths profaned; for “the Chaldeans” denote those who profess truths outwardly, but inwardly deny them, and thus profane them; “men portrayed upon the wall” denote appearances of truth in outward things; and in like manner “images portrayed with vermilion;” “the girdles with which they were girt on the loins” denote the goods which they feign in order that their truths may be believed.
[9] From all this it can now be seen what was signified in the representative church by the “girdles,” which gather together the garments into one. But that such things were signified can with difficulty be brought to the belief of the natural man, for the reason that he can with difficulty cast away the natural idea about girdles, and about garments in general; and in its place take to himself the spiritual idea, which is that of good holding truths together in connection; for the natural thing, which appears before the sight, keeps the mind fixed on itself, and is not removed unless the intellectual sight can be raised even into the light of heaven, and the man thus be able to think almost abstractedly from natural things. When this is done, there enter the spiritual things of the truth of faith and the good of love, which are imperceptible to the merely natural man.

AC (Potts) n. 9829 sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9829. And they shall make garments of holiness for Aaron thy brother, and for his sons. That this signifies thereby a representative of the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom, is evident from what was shown above (n. 9814).

AC (Potts) n. 9830 sRef Ex@28 @4 S0′ 9830. That he may minister to Me in the priest’s office, signifies a representative of the Lord (as above, n. 9809, 9810).

AC (Potts) n. 9831 sRef Ex@28 @8 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @7 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @6 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @5 S0′ 9831. Verses 5-8. And they shall take the gold, and the blue, and the crimson, and the scarlet double-dyed, and the fine linen. And they shall make the ephod of gold, of blue and crimson, of scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen, with the work of a thinker.* It shall have two shoulders joined at the two extremities thereof; and it shall be joined together. And the girdle of his ephod, which is upon it, according to the work thereof shall be from it; of gold, of blue and crimson, and of scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen. “And they shall take the gold,” signifies good reigning universally; “and the blue, and the crimson, and the scarlet double-dyed, and the fine linen,” signifies the good of charity and of faith; “and they shall make the ephod of gold, of blue and crimson, of scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen,” signifies the external of the spiritual kingdom from this good; “with the work of a thinker,”* signifies from the understanding; “it shall have two shoulders joined at the two extremities thereof, and it shall be joined together,” signifies the preservation by a complete unition of good and truth on all sides and forever, with all exertion and power; “and the girdle of his ephod, which is upon it,” signifies an external binding-together; “according to the work thereof, shall be from it,” signifies what is like and continuous from the external of the spiritual kingdom; “of gold, of blue and crimson, and of scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen,” signifies thus from the good of faith and of charity, in external things.
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9832 sRef Ex@28 @5 S0′ sRef Ex@39 @3 S0′ 9832. And they shall take the gold. That this signifies good reigning universally, is evident from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love (see n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 9490, 9510); that this reigns universally, is signified by the gold being interwoven everywhere in the ephod, as is evident from what follows in this book:
They spread out plates of gold, and he cut them into threads, to work them in the midst of the blue, and in the midst of the crimson, and in the midst of the scarlet double-dyed, and in the midst of the fine twined linen (Exod. 39:3).
That which reigns universally is that which rules, thus is in each and all things (n. 5949, 6159, 7648, 8067, 8853-8858, 8865). The reason why gold was interwoven everywhere, was that by the garments of Aaron was represented the spiritual heaven (n. 9814), and good reigns in this heaven, as it does in the other heavens also. In the inmost heaven reigns the good of love to the Lord; in the middle heaven, the good of charity toward the neighbor; and in the ultimate heaven, the good of faith. But the truth which is of faith leads men in unto good, and afterward is produced from good. From this it is evident that a man is not in heaven until he is in good. If he is only in the truths which are called matters of faith, he merely stands before the door; and if from these truths he looks to good, he enters into the vestibule; but if from these truths he does not look to good, he does not see heaven, not even from afar. It is said that a man is not in heaven until he is in good, because while a man is in the world he ought to have heaven in himself, in order that he may enter into it after death. For heaven is in man, and is in mercy given to those who, while they live in the world, suffer themselves to be brought through the truths of faith into charity toward the neighbor and into love to the Lord; that is, into good. (That a man is not in heaven until he is in the state of being led by the Lord by means of good, see n. 8516, 8539, 8722, 8772, 9139.) By “good” is meant the good of life, and the good of life is to do what is good from willing it, and to will good is from love; for that which a man loves he wills.

AC (Potts) n. 9833 sRef Ex@28 @5 S0′ 9833. And the blue, and the crimson, and the scarlet double-dyed, and the fine linen. That this signifies the good of charity and of faith, is evident from the signification of “blue,” as being the celestial love of truth (see n. 9466); from the signification of “crimson,” as being the celestial love of good (n. 9467); from the signification of “scarlet double-dyed,” as being spiritual good (n. 4922, 9468); and from the signification of “fine linen,” as being truth from a celestial origin (n. 5319, 9469). Thus taken together these words signify the good of love and of faith; but here the good of charity and of faith, because they are predicated of the spiritual kingdom (n. 9814). This signification of “blue, crimson, scarlet double-dyed, and fine linen,” as being the things of love or charity, and of faith, arises from the colors themselves. For the colors which appear in heaven originate from the light of heaven, which light is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, from which is all intelligence and wisdom. Hence the variegations of this light, which before the external sight in heaven appear as colors, are variegations of intelligence and wisdom from the truths and goods of faith, of charity, and of love (n. 1042, 1053, 1624, 3993, 4530, 4677, 4741, 4742, 4922, 9466). (That insofar as the colors in heaven partake of red they signify good, and insofar as they partake of white they signify truth, see n. 9467.)

AC (Potts) n. 9834 sRef Ex@28 @6 S0′ 9834. And they shall make the ephod of gold, of blue and crimson, of scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen. That this signifies the external of the spiritual kingdom from this good, is evident from the signification of “the ephod,” as being the external of the spiritual kingdom (n. 9824); from the signification of “gold,” as being good, here good universally reigning (of which above, n. 9832); and from the signification of “blue, crimson, scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen,” as being the good of charity and of faith (of which just above, n. 9833); wherefore the external of the spiritual kingdom is derived from this good.

AC (Potts) n. 9835 sRef Ex@28 @6 S0′ 9835. With the work of a thinker.* That this signifies from the understanding, is evident from the signification of “a thinker,”* as being the understanding (n. 9598, 9688); and therefore “the work of a thinker”* denotes that which is from this. That “a thinker”* denotes the understanding, is because thought belongs to the understanding, just as the affection of love belongs to the will. In the internal sense “a thinker”* signified the like as “thought;” for in the internal sense the person is not attended to, but only the thing itself, and a thinker* implies a person (on this subject, see n. 5225, 5287, 5434, 8343, 8985, 9007). What is meant by being derived from the understanding must be briefly stated. The subject here treated of is the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, and in respect to all the truths and goods which are therein, this kingdom belongs to the intellectual part; while the truths and goods in the Lord’s celestial kingdom belong to the will part. For there are two things to which all things in the universe bear relation, namely, good and truth; for which reason there are in man two faculties, the will and the understanding; the will being for the sake of good, and the understanding for the sake of truth; for the will receives good, and the understanding truth.
[2] The case is similar in the heavens, where there are two kingdoms, the celestial and the spiritual; the celestial kingdom is for the sake of the reception of good, and the spiritual kingdom is for the sake of the reception of truth. And because the universal heaven corresponds to all things that are in man, therefore before the Lord heaven is like one man, who accordingly also has two faculties, a will and an understanding; his will being in the celestial kingdom, and his understanding in the spiritual kingdom. Now because the spiritual kingdom was represented by the garments of Aaron, and the intellectual part of heaven is in this kingdom, therefore by “the work of a thinker”* is signified the intellectual part. (That from its correspondence with each and all things in man, the universal heaven is like one man, and is called the Grand Man, may be seen in the passages already cited in n. 9276e; and that with those who are in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom goods and truths have been inscribed on their intellectual part; but with those who are in the celestial kingdom on their will part, may also be seen in the passages already cited in n. 9277, 9596.)
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9836 sRef Ex@28 @7 S0′ 9836. It shall have two shoulders joined at the two extremities thereof; and it shall be joined together. That this signifies the preservation, by a complete unition, of good and truth on all sides and forever, with all exertion and power, is evident from the signification of “the shoulders,” as being all force and power (see n. 1085, 4931-4937); but by “putting on the shoulders,” and by “carrying” upon them (as is said in what follows of the two onyx stones on which were graven the names of the sons of Israel), is meant the preservation of good and truth forever (for by “the names of the sons of Israel” are signified all goods and truths in the complex, on which subject see below); from the signification of “being joined together,” and “being conjoined,” as being a complete unition; and from the signification of “the two extremities,” that is, at the right and at the left, as being on all sides (n. 8613).
[2] The case herein is this. By the ephod (as shown above) was represented the external of the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, and therefore by its shoulder pieces, on which were placed the two onyx stones with the names of the sons of Israel, was represented the perpetual preservation of good and truth; and by the joining together of the ephod on the shoulders, and also before the breast and behind the back, there was represented a complete unition. From this it can be seen what is signified by what is said below about the shoulderpieces and the engravings upon them; namely, the preservation of good and truth forever with all exertion and power; thus the preservation of the heavens. These stones with the names of the sons of Israel were placed on the shoulderpieces of the ephod, by which was represented the external of the spiritual kingdom, for the reason that all preservation depends on the state of the ultimates, for all the interior things cease there, and form a plane there in which they may subsist. Ultimates are like the soles and the feet, on which the whole body stands, and are also like the hands and the arms, by means of which the body exerts its powers, and into which the body transfers its forces. It is also from this that the hands and the arms, as well as the soles and the feet, correspond to the ultimates of heaven. That power and strength reside in ultimates was represented in the Ancient Church by the hair with the Nazirites, in which resided their strength, as is plain from Samson (Judges 14-16), and also their sanctity (n. 3301). (That the hair, which with them was the Naziriteship, corresponds to the ultimates of good and truth, or to good and truth in ultimates, see n. 3301, 5247, 6437.)
[3] That power resides in ultimates, and also the conservation of the interiors in their state, can be understood by those who know how the case is in nature with things successive and thence simultaneous; namely, that successive things at last form in ultimates what is simultaneous, in which these successive things are in a like order side by side. Wherefore simultaneous things, which are ultimate, serve successive things, which are prior, as corresponding supports on which they may lean, and thus by means of which they may be preserved.
sRef Ezek@29 @6 S4′ sRef Ezek@29 @7 S4′ sRef Ezek@34 @21 S4′ [4] That “shoulders” signify all force and power in resisting, in breaking, and in acting, is evident in these passages:
Ye push with side and with shoulder, and thrust all the feeble sheep with your horns, till ye have scattered them abroad (Ezek. 34:21).
Egypt is a staff of reed to the house of Israel. When they took hold of thee by the hand, thou didst break, and didst pierce through all their shoulder (Ezek. 29:6, 7);
“to pierce through all the shoulder” denotes to deprive of all power to comprehend truths; “Egypt” denotes the perverted memory-knowledge which deprives.
sRef Ps@21 @11 S5′ sRef Zech@7 @11 S5′ sRef Ps@21 @12 S5′ [5] In Zechariah:
They refused to hearken, and turned a stubborn shoulder (Zech. 7:11);
“to turn a stubborn shoulder” denotes to resist. In David:
They thought a wicked device, they did not prevail, for thou shalt offer to them the shoulder (Ps. 21:11, 12);
“to offer to them the shoulder” also denotes to resist; thus it denotes power. That “the shoulder” denotes power, is plain from the representatives in the other life, where they who resist seem to oppose the shoulder.
sRef Isa@49 @22 S6′ sRef Luke@15 @5 S6′ sRef Num@7 @9 S6′ [6] That “to put upon the shoulders and carry” denotes to preserve in a state of good and truth forever with all exertion and power, is evident in Isaiah:
The nations shall bring thy sons in their bosom, and they shall carry thy daughters upon the shoulder (Isa. 49:22);
the subject here treated of is the New Church; by “the sons” are signified truths, and by “the daughters,” goods; “to carry upon the shoulder” denotes to preserve them. The preservation of good in its state was also represented by the sons of Israel, when they went forth out of Egypt, carrying the dough on the shoulder (Exod. 12:34); and by the sons of Kohath carrying the works of what is holy upon the shoulder (Num. 7:9).
From this it is that the Lord, who spoke by correspondences, said of the lost sheep when it was found, that “he laid it on his shoulder rejoicing” (Luke 15:5); “the sheep that was lost and was found” denotes the good with the man who repents.
sRef Isa@46 @7 S7′ sRef Ex@28 @12 S7′ [7] As this was signified by “carrying on the shoulder,” therefore also it is said of the gold and silver which they love and preserve, that “they carry them on their shoulder” (Isa. 46:7). (That “to carry” denotes also to hold together in its state, see n. 9500.) From all this it is evident what was signified by the names of the sons of Israel engraved on two onyx stones being placed upon the shoulder pieces of the ephod, and by its being said that Aaron should bear or carry them upon his two shoulders for a remembrance (verse 12). That “carrying upon the shoulder,” when said of subjection, signifies servitude, may be seen in Gen. 49:15; Ps. 81:6; Isa. 9:4; 10:27; Matt. 23:4; Zeph. 3:9; but that when said of command, it signifies supreme power, Isa. 9:6; 22:22.

AC (Potts) n. 9837 sRef Ex@28 @8 S0′ 9837. And the girdle of his ephod, which is upon it. That this signifies an external binding-together, is evident from the signification of “the girdle,” as being a general bond by which the interior things are held in connection (see above, n. 9828), thus it signifies a binding-together. That it denotes an external binding-together, is because by “the ephod” is signified the external of the spiritual kingdom (n. 9824).

AC (Potts) n. 9838 sRef Ex@28 @8 S0′ 9838. According to the work thereof shall be from it. That this signifies what is like and continuous from the external of the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the signification of “according to the work,” as being what is like, for that which is according to the work of another thing is like it; and from the signification of “being from it,” as being what is continuous, for that which is from another thing is not only like it, but is also continuous with it. That what is continuous with the external of the spiritual kingdom is signified, is because what is continuous with the ephod is meant, and by “the ephod” is signified the external of the spiritual kingdom (see n. 9824).

AC (Potts) n. 9839 sRef Ex@28 @8 S0′ 9839. Of gold, of blue and crimson, and of scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen. That this signifies thus from the good of faith and of charity in external things, is evident from the signification of all these things taken together, as being the good of faith and of charity (see n. 9687, 9833). That it denotes in external things, is because by the bond which was to be woven of gold, of blue, of crimson, of scarlet, and of fine twined linen, is signified an external bond or binding-together (n. 9837).

AC (Potts) n. 9840 sRef Ex@28 @8 S0′ 9840. Verses 9-14. And thou shalt take two onyx stones, and engrave on them the names of the sons of Israel; six of their names on the one stone, and the names of the six that remain on the other stone, according to their generations. With the work of a worker in stone, with the engravings of a signet, shalt thou engrave the two stones, according to the names of the sons of Israel; encompassed with settings of gold shalt thou make them. And thou shalt put the two stones upon the shoulders of the ephod, to be stones of remembrance for the sons of Israel; and Aaron shall bear their names before Jehovah upon his two shoulders for a remembrance. And thou shalt make settings of gold, and two chains of pure gold; from their borders shalt thou make them, with cord-work; and thou shalt put the chains of cords on the settings. “And thou shalt take two onyx stones,” signifies the interior memory which is from the truths of faith that are from love; “and engrave on them the names of the sons of Israel,” signifies on which have been impressed the truths and goods of the spiritual kingdom in respect to all their quality; “six of their names on the one stone,” signifies the whole quality of truths from good; “and the names of the six that remain on the other stone,” signifies all the quality of truths through which is good; “according to their generations,” signifies each in that order in which the one is generated and proceeds from the other; “with the work of a worker in stone, with the engravings of a signet, shalt thou engrave the two stones, according to the names of the sons of Israel,” signifies the heavenly form of all truths in their order in the memory from the good of love, thus intellectual things therein with the regenerate according to their arrangement in order by the will; “encompassed with settings of gold shalt thou make them,” signifies coming-forth and subsistence from good; “and thou shalt put the two stones upon the shoulders of the ephod,” signifies the preservation of good and truth with all exertion and power; “to be stones of remembrance for the sons of Israel,” signifies from mercy forever for the spiritual kingdom; “and Aaron shall bear their names before Jehovah upon his two shoulders for a remembrance,” signifies a representative of the Divine preservation of good and truth forever, from mercy; “and thou shalt make settings of gold,” signifies a continual coming-forth and subsistence from good; “and two chains of pure gold,” signifies a coherence with the good of the whole kingdom; “from their borders shalt thou make them,” signifies from the extremes through which there is influx; “with cord-work,” signifies the method of the conjunction; “and thou shalt put the chains of cords upon the settings,” signifies conjunction with the good from which are truths, and in this way the preservation of the spiritual kingdom, with all exertion and power.

AC (Potts) n. 9841 sRef Ex@28 @9 S0′ sRef Isa@49 @16 S1′ sRef Isa@49 @15 S1′ 9841. And thou shalt take two onyx stones. That this signifies the interior memory which is from the truths of faith that are from love, is evident from the signification of “stones,” as being truths (see n. 114, 643, 1298, 3720, 6426, 8609), and of “onyx stones,” as being truths of faith from love (n. 9476). That these denote the memory, is because there was engraved on them the names of the sons of Israel, and by “engraving on stones” is signified the memory of things that are to permanently remain; as in the engraving or writing of the Law on the tables of stone, by which are signified things impressed on the memory and life, thus which are to remain permanently (see n. 9416). That “engraving” or “writing on stones” has this signification, is because truths have been impressed on man’s memory, and also things which have the appearance of truth, insomuch that it is even composed of these things; and “stones” signify truths; and when there is engraving on them, they signify the memory where the truths are; like “the engraving upon the hands” in Isaiah:
Though these may forget, yet will I not forget thee. Behold I have graven thee upon the hands (Isa. 49:15, 16).
It is from this that the onyx stones are called “stones of remembrance for the sons of Israel” (Exod. 28:12).
[2] That “the onyx stones,” from the engraving on them, signify the interior memory, is because the things that were engraved, which were the names of the sons of Israel, signify spiritual truths (of which below); “the onyx stones” signify such truths; moreover, the interior memory of man must consist of such. (That man has two memories, an exterior and an interior one, and that the exterior memory is natural, thus composed of such things as come forth in the world; but the interior memory is spiritual, thus composed of such things as are in heaven, see n. 2469-2494, 5212, 8067.)
[3] That stones on which there is engraving denote the memory on which truths are inscribed, has its origin from the representatives in heaven. When men go forth who after their decease come into the other life, and bring with them the truths of faith in the natural or exterior memory only, and not in the spiritual or interior memory, they seem to themselves to wander about among rocks and in forests. But when men go forth who bring with them the truths of faith in the spiritual memory also, they seem to themselves to walk among cultivated hills, and also in gardens.
The reason is that the truths of faith of the exterior or natural memory (which are memory-knowledges) have no life unless they are at the same time in the interior or spiritual memory; for the things which are in this latter memory have been made of life, because the interior or spiritual memory is man’s book of life (n. 2474); and the things which are of life are represented in heaven by gardens, oliveyards, vineyards, and by flower-beds and shrubberies; and the things of charity, by hills where such things are (n. 6435); but those things which are not of life are represented by rocky places and thickets which are bare and rough.
[4] It shall be briefly told what are truths of faith from love. Truths of faith from love are truths which love dictates, thus which derive their being from love. These truths are living, because the things which are from love are living. Consequently the truths of faith from love are those which treat of love to the Lord and charity toward the neighbor, for these are the truths which love dictates. The whole Word is the doctrine of such truths; for in its spiritual sense the Word treats solely of things which belong to the Lord and the neighbor, thus which belong to love to the Lord and toward the neighbor. It is from this that the Word is living. This is meant by the statement that “on these two commandments hang the Law and the Prophets” (Matt. 22:34-40); “the Law and the Prophets” denote the Word in its whole complex. But truths of faith from love are not bare knowledges of such things with man in the memory, and from this in the understanding; but they are affections of life with him; for the things which a man loves and therefore does, are of his life. There are also truths of faith which do not, like the former, treat of love; but which merely confirm these truths more nearly, or more remotely. These truths of faith are called secondary truths. For the truths of faith are like families and their generations in succession from one father. The father of these truths is the good of love from the Lord and consequently to Him, thus it is the Lord; for whether we say the Lord, or love from Him and consequently to Him, it is the same thing; because love is spiritual conjunction, and causes Him to be where the love is; for love causes him who is loved to be present in itself.

AC (Potts) n. 9842 sRef Ex@28 @9 S0′ 9842. And engrave on them the names of the sons of Israel. That this signifies on which are impressed the truths and goods of the spiritual kingdom in respect to all their quality, is evident from the signification of “engraving on stones,” as being to impress on the memory (of which just above, n. 9841); from the signification of “names,” as being quality (n. 144, 145, 1754, 1896, 2009, 6674); and from the representation of the sons of Israel, as being all the truths and goods of the spiritual kingdom. By “the sons of Israel” are here meant the twelve tribes, because the names of these were engraved on these stones; and by “the twelve tribes” are signified all truths and goods in the complex (n. 3858, 3926, 3939, 4060, 6335, 6337); and as the church or heaven is from these, therefore by “the sons of Israel” is signified the Lord’s spiritual church and kingdom (n. 4286, 6637, 7836, 7891, 7996, 7997, 9340). From this it is evident that by “engraving on them the names of the sons of Israel” is signified to impress on the memory the whole quality of the truths and goods of the spiritual kingdom; that is, the truths and goods of this kingdom in respect to all their quality.

AC (Potts) n. 9843 sRef Ex@28 @10 S0′ 9843. Six of their names on the one stone. That this signifies all the quality of truths from good, is evident from the signification of the number “six,” as being all (see n. 3960, 7973, 8148), here all truths from good (of which in what follows); from the signification of “names,” as being quality (as above, n. 9842); and from the signification of “on a stone,” as being an impressing on the memory (of which also above, n. 9841). That all truths from good are meant, is because there were two stones on which were engraved the names of the sons of Israel, and the one stone was on the right shoulder, and the other on the left shoulder; and those things with man which are on his right, correspond to the good from which are truths, that is, to truths from good; while those things which are on his left, correspond to the truths through which is good (n. 9604, 9736). Thus the names of the sons of Israel engraved on the stone which was on the right shoulder, signified truths from good; and those on the left shoulder, signified truths through which is good.

AC (Potts) n. 9844 sRef Ex@28 @10 S0′ 9844. And the names of the six that remain, on the other stone. That this signifies all the quality of the truths through which is good, is evident from what was said just above (n. 9843).

AC (Potts) n. 9845 sRef Ex@28 @10 S0′ 9845. According to their generations. That this signifies each in that order in which the one is generated and proceeds from the other, is evident from the signification of “generations” as being the things which are of faith and charity; that is, those which belong to truth and good in the spiritual world (see n. 613, 2020, 2584, 6239, 9042, 9079); whence “according to the generations,” denotes according to the order in which the one is generated and proceeds from the other; namely, good from truth, and truth from good. For the man who is being generated anew by the Lord has two states; the first is a state of truth, and the second is a state of good. So long as the man is in the first state, he is led by means of truths to good; but when he is in the second state, he is led by means of good. This latter state is the state of heaven with the man, for he is not in heaven until he is in good (see what was shown above, n. 9832). From all this it is evident what is signified by “according to the generations of the sons of Israel.” It is said “in that order in which the one is generated and proceeds from the other,” because just as good is generated by means of truths, so afterward it proceeds; and in like manner just as truths are generated from good, so afterward they proceed. For they are generated successively, and proceed afterward in that order in which they have successively been born. But these things are said for those who know how series of things are produced successively.

AC (Potts) n. 9846 sRef Ex@28 @11 S0′ 9846. With the work of a worker in stone, with the engravings of a signet, shalt thou engrave the two stones, according to the names of the sons of Israel. That this signifies the heavenly form of all truths in their order in the memory from the good of love, thus intellectual things therein with the regenerate, according to their arrangement in order by the will, is evident from the signification of “a worker in stone,” as being the good of love, thus the will of one who is regenerate, for this is from the good of love, because the will of one who is regenerate receives the good of love, and his understanding receives the truths of faith; from the signification of “the engravings of a signet,” as being the heavenly form of all truths, such as it is in the understanding of a regenerated person, because the truths of faith have been disposed therein into a heavenly form. It is from this that a regenerated man is a heaven in a little image (see the places cited in n. 9279); and that the understanding of a regenerated man corresponds to the spiritual kingdom in heaven, and his will to the celestial kingdom (n. 9835). From this it is plain what is the heavenly form of truths with a man. From the signification of “to engrave stones,” as being to impress on the memory (n. 9842), here to impress such a form on the truths which are therein. And from the signification of “the names of the sons of Israel,” as being truths and goods in respect to all their quality in their order (of which above, n. 9842-9845).
[2] That by “a worker in stone” is signified the good of love, or the will of one who is regenerate, is because the good of love works in a man while he is being regenerated, and disposes the truths with him into order; and afterward, when he has been regenerated, it keeps them in their order. For truths are created according to the whole likeness of good, and according to its every command, thus according to everything of love; for good is of love. That this is so, is evident from the fact that a man acknowledges as truths the things that he loves, and that in this way he apprehends and acknowledges truths according to his love. It is from this that truths constitute the form of good. From this it can be known how the Lord leads man by means of the truths of faith, that is, by means of faith; namely, that He leads him by means of the good of love that is in him; and further, how the Lord also directs a man mediately through heaven; for a regenerated man is a heaven in a little image (as said above); wherefore, as the Lord directs heaven, He also together with it directs such a man.

AC (Potts) n. 9847 sRef Ex@28 @11 S0′ 9847. Encompassed with settings of gold shalt thou make them. That this signifies a coming-forth and subsistence from good, is evident from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love (see n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 9490); hence “to be encompassed with settings of gold,” denotes to be continued from good, and to derive its coming-forth or rise from it; and because it denotes to derive its coming-forth, it also denotes to derive its subsistence; for a thing subsists from the same source as that from which it comes forth; because subsistence is a perpetual coming-forth. The case with good and truth is similar as with the gold with which a jewel is encompassed; for good is like ground, and truths are like the seeds therein, because truths are born in good, and nowhere else, and they also flourish in accordance with the quality of the good.

AC (Potts) n. 9848 sRef Ex@28 @12 S0′ 9848. And thou shalt put the two stones upon the shoulders of the ephod. That this signifies the preservation of good and truth with all exertion and power, is evident from what was shown above (n. 9836).

AC (Potts) n. 9849 sRef Ex@28 @12 S0′ 9849. To be stones of remembrance for the sons of Israel. That this signifies from mercy forever for the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the signification of “the stones of remembrance upon the shoulders of the ephod,” as being the preservation of good and truth from mercy forever (that “the stones upon the shoulders” denote the preservation of good and truth, is evident from what was shown above, n. 9836; and that “remembrance,” when said of the Lord, denotes mercy, will be evident from what follows); and from the signification of “the sons of Israel,” as being the Lord’s spiritual kingdom (see n. 9842). It is said of Jehovah in the Word, that is, of the Lord that He “remembers,” and that He “does not remember,” and by this is signified that it is then done from mercy, whether it is preservation or deliverance. In like manner it is said that He “sees,” “hears,” and “knows,” and that He “does not see,” “hear,” and “know;” by which expressions also is signified having compassion, or not having compassion. That it is so said is from the likeness and appearance with man; for when a man turns away from the Lord, as is the case when he does evil, then, because the Lord is at his back, it appears to him as if the Lord does not see him, does not hear him, and does not know him, and also does not remember him; when yet this is with the man, and therefore from the appearance it is so said in the Word. Very different is it when a man turns toward the Lord, as is the case when he acts well. (See the places cited in n. 9306.) Everyone can know that calling to mind, or remembering, cannot be predicated of the Lord, because things past and future are in Him eternal, that is, are present from eternity to eternity.
sRef Ps@111 @4 S2′ sRef Ps@79 @8 S2′ sRef Ps@98 @2 S2′ sRef Ps@106 @45 S2′ sRef Ps@25 @7 S2′ sRef Ps@136 @23 S2′ sRef Luke@1 @72 S2′ sRef Ps@98 @3 S2′ sRef Ps@111 @5 S2′ [2] That “remembering,” when said of the Lord, denotes to have compassion, and thus from mercy to preserve or deliver, is evident from the following passages:
Jehovah hath made known His salvation; His righteousness hath He revealed before the eyes of the nations. He hath remembered His mercy and His truth toward the house of Israel (Ps. 98:2, 3).
Jehovah hath remembered us in our humility, for His mercy is forever (Ps. 136:23).
Remember not the sins of my youth, and my transgressions; according to Thy mercy remember Thou me, for Thy goodness’ sake, O Jehovah (Ps. 25:7).
He remembered for them His covenant, and repented in the multitude of His mercies (Ps. 106:45).
He hath made His wonderful works to be remembered; Jehovah is gracious and merciful. He hath given food unto them that fear Him; He hath remembered His covenant forever (Ps. 111:4, 5).
Remember not former iniquities; let Thy compassions anticipate us (Ps. 79:8).
God hath accepted his servant Israel, that He might remember His mercy; to do mercy with our fathers, and to remember His holy covenant (Luke 1:54, 72).
What is man that Thou dost remember him? (Ps. 8:4).
Remember me, O Jehovah, in the good pleasure of Thy people (Ps. 106:4).
Jehovah hath remembered us; He blesseth (Ps. 115:12).
If looking Thou wilt look on the misery of Thine handmaid, and wilt remember me, and not forget Thine handmaid (1 Sam. 1:11);
being the prayer of Hannah the mother of Samuel; and when she bare him, it is said that “Jehovah remembered her” (verse 19), that is, looked upon her misery, and performed mercy. In like manner in many other passages, as Lev. 26:41-42, 45; Num. 10:9; Isa. 43:25; 49:1; 64:9; Jer. 31:34.

AC (Potts) n. 9850 sRef Ex@28 @13 S0′ 9850. And Aaron shall bear their names before Jehovah upon his two shoulders for a remembrance. That this signifies a representative of the Divine preservation of good and truth forever, from mercy, is evident from the signification of “bearing,” or “carrying, upon the two shoulders,” as being the Divine preservation of good and truth (see n. 9836); from the signification of “the names of the sons of Israel,” as being goods and truths in all their quality (n. 9842); and from the signification of “remembrance,” when said of the Lord, as being mercy (of which just above, n. 9849). That it denotes a representative of such things is evident.

AC (Potts) n. 9851 sRef Ex@28 @13 S0′ 9851. And thou shalt make settings of gold. That this signifies a continual coming-forth and subsistence from good, is evident from what was said above (n. 9847). That it denotes what is continual, is because “settings” are here mentioned a second time.

AC (Potts) n. 9852 sRef Ex@28 @14 S0′ 9852. And two chains of pure gold. That this signifies a coherence with the good of the whole kingdom, is evident from the signification of “chains,” as being a coherence; that “chains” have this signification is because joinings together are effected by means of them, and when effected they cohere, here with the spiritual kingdom, because the chains were made for the sake of coherence with the ephod, by which was represented the spiritual kingdom in general (n. 9824); and from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 9490). The gold is said to be “pure,” because good from the Divine is signified, for this is pure, and it holds together all things in heaven in their connection and form. That “chains” denote coherence is evident also in Isaiah:
The workman foundeth a graven image, and the metal-caster spreadeth it over with gold, and casteth with silver chains (Isa. 40:19);
“a graven image” denotes the doctrine of what is false, which is from self-intelligence, thus is devoid of life from the Divine (n. 8869, 8941); the hatching of such doctrine is signified by “the workman foundeth a graven image;” and that this may appear to be from good, is signified by “the metal-caster spreading it over with gold;” and that the falsities may have a coherence is signified by his “casting for it silver chains.” (That “silver” denotes truth, and in the opposite sense, falsity, see n. 1551, 2954, 5658, 6112, 6914, 6917, 8932.)

AC (Potts) n. 9853 sRef Ex@28 @14 S0′ 9853. From their borders shalt thou make them. That this signifies from the extremes through which there is influx, is evident from the signification of “the borders,” as being the extremes. That through these there is influx, namely, of good, is because by the “chains” is signified coherence (n. 9852), and in the spiritual world all coherence is effected by influx.

AC (Potts) n. 9854 sRef Ex@28 @14 S0′ 9854. With cord-work. That this signifies the method of the conjunction, is evident from the signification of “cord,” as being that which conjoins. That “cord” denotes that which conjoins, is because by means of it conjunction is effected; but here it signifies the method of the conjunction, because it is said that the chains of gold were to be made with cord-work. In the original tongue there is meant a cord made of twisted and entwined work, by which in the internal sense is signified conjunction such as is that of truths in memory-knowledges and among memory-knowledges, thus of those which are in the natural or external memory. The reason why such conjunction is signified, is that the subject here treated of is the conjunction of truths by means of good in the ultimates of the spiritual kingdom; for by “the ephod” and “the breastplate,” with which by means of the chains made with a work of cords there was conjunction, is signified the spiritual kingdom in ultimates (n. 9824); (that what is entwined denotes memory-knowledge, see n. 2831).
sRef Isa@33 @20 S2′ sRef Isa@5 @18 S2′ sRef Isa@33 @23 S2′ [2] Moreover, in the other life there appear cords of various twist and thickness, and by them are represented various methods of conjunction. It is from this that by “ropes” or “cords” in the Word also are signified things which conjoin, as in the following passages:
Woe unto them that draw iniquity with cords of vanity, and sin as it were with a cart rope (Isa. 5:18);
where “cords of vanity” denote conjunctions of falsities through which there is iniquity or evil of life. Again:
Look upon Zion, the city of our set feast; thine eyes shall see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a tent that shall not be scattered; the stakes thereof shall never be removed, neither shall any of the cords thereof be plucked out. Thy cords have been slackened; they shall not make firm their pole (Isa. 33:20, 23);
here “stakes” and “cords” denote the things which conjoin the truths and goods of heaven, for the Habitation and the Tent, of which “the cords” are here predicated, denote heaven (n. 9457, 9481, 9485, 9615, 9784).
sRef Isa@54 @2 S3′ sRef Hos@11 @4 S3′ sRef Jer@10 @20 S3′ sRef Ezek@27 @24 S3′ sRef Ezek@27 @23 S3′ [3] Again:
Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thy habitations; forbid not, make long thy cords and make firm thy stakes (Isa. 54:2).
My tent is laid waste, and all My cords plucked out (Jer. 10:20);
here also “cords” denote things which conjoin and make firm; “tent” denotes the church, which is the heaven of the Lord. In Hosea:
I drew them with cords of a man, with thick cords of love (Hos. 11:4);
where “cords” manifestly denote the things which conjoin, for love is spiritual conjunction. In Ezekiel:
Asshur and Chilmad were thy traders in chests of garments tied with cords (Ezek. 27:23, 24);
speaking of Tyre, by which are signified the knowledges of good and truth (n. 1201); the external conjunctions of these are meant by “garments tied with cords.” Moreover, in the Word “cords” also signify portions of inheritance and of land, for the reason that measurements were made with cords (see Deut. 32:9; Amos 7:17; Micah 2:4, 5; Zech. 2:1; Ps. 16:6; 78:55; 105:11; 140:5; and many other passages).

AC (Potts) n. 9855 sRef Ex@28 @14 S0′ 9855. And thou shalt put the chains of cords upon the settings. That this signifies conjunction with the good from which are truths, and in this way the preservation of the spiritual kingdom with all exertion and power, is evident from the signification of “the chains which were a work of cords,” as being coherence and conjunction with good (of which above, n. 9852, 9854); and from the signification of “settings of gold,” as being the coming-forth and subsistence of truths from good (of which also above, at n. 9847). The preservation of good and truth in the spiritual kingdom, or what is the same thing, the preservation of the spiritual kingdom, with all exertion and power, is signified by the two onyx stones being put upon the shoulderpieces of the ephod, on which stones were engraved the names of the sons of Israel (see n. 9836, 9848, 9849).

AC (Potts) n. 9856 sRef Ex@28 @19 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @17 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @18 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @16 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @30 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @21 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @20 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @26 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @22 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @24 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @27 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @29 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @25 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @15 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @23 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @28 S0′ 9856. Verses 15-30. And thou shalt make a breastplate of judgment, with the work of a thinker;* like the work of the ephod thou shalt make it; of gold, of blue and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen, shalt thou make it. Foursquare it shall be, doubled; a span the length thereof and a span the breadth thereof. And thou shalt fill it with a filling of stone, four rows of stone; a row, a ruby, a topaz, and a carbuncle, row one; and the second row, a chrysoprase, a sapphire, and a diamond; the third row, a cyanus, an agate, and an amethyst; and the fourth row, a tarshish [beryl], and an onyx, and a jasper; they shall be enclosed in gold in their fillings. And the stones shall be upon the names of the sons of Israel, twelve, upon their names, with the engravings of a signet, for everyone upon his name, they shall be for the twelve tribes. And thou shalt make upon the breastplate chains of the border with cord-work, of pure gold. And thou shalt make upon the breastplate two rings of gold, and shalt put the two rings on the two extremities of the breastplate. And thou shalt put the two cords of gold on the two rings at the extremities of the breastplate. And the two extremities of the two cords thou shalt put on the two settings, and shalt put them on the shoulders of the ephod over against the faces thereof. And thou shalt make two rings of gold, and thou shalt put them upon the two extremities of the breastplate, upon the edge thereof which is toward the side of the ephod inward. And thou shalt make two rings of gold, and shalt put them on the shoulders of the ephod underneath, its faces opposite to the joining thereof above the girdle of the ephod. And they shall bind the breastplate by the rings thereof unto the rings of the ephod with a thread of blue, that it may be upon the girdle of the ephod, and that the breastplate withdraw not from upon the ephod. And Aaron shall carry the names of the sons of Israel in the breastplate of judgment upon his heart when he goeth in unto the holiness, for a remembrance before Jehovah continually. And thou shalt put unto the breastplate of judgment the Urim and the Thummim; and they shall be upon Aaron’s heart when he goeth in before Jehovah; and Aaron shall carry the judgment of the sons of Israel upon his heart before Jehovah continually.
“And thou shalt make a breastplate of judgment” signifies that which has regard to Divine truth shining forth from Divine good; “with the work of a thinker*” signifies from the intellectual part; “like the work of the ephod thou shalt make it” signifies what is continuous with the external of the spiritual kingdom; “of gold, of blue and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen, shalt thou make it” signifies the good of charity and of faith; “foursquare it shall be, doubled” signifies what is righteous and perfect; “a span the length thereof, and a span the breadth thereof” signifies equally as to good and as to truth; “and thou shalt fill it with a filling of stone” signifies truths themselves in their order from one good; “four rows of stone, a row” signifies the conjunction of all; “a ruby, a topaz, and a carbuncle” signifies the celestial love of good; “row one” signifies a trine therein as a one; “and the second row” signifies this trine also as a one; “a chrysoprase, a sapphire, and a diamond” signifies the celestial love of truth; “and the third row” signifies a trine also here as a one; “a cyanus, an agate, and an amethyst” signifies the spiritual love of good; “and the fourth row” signifies the last trine as a one; “a tarshish [beryl], and an onyx, and a jasper” signifies the spiritual love of truth; “they shall be enclosed in gold in their fillings” signifies that each and all things in general and in particular shall proceed from the good which is of love from the Lord to the Lord; “and the stones shall be upon the names of the sons of Israel” signifies the goods and truths distinctively in respect to every quality; “twelve, upon their names” signifies each and all things in the complex; “with the engravings of a signet” signifies according to the heavenly form; “for everyone upon his name” signifies for each in particular; “they shall be for the twelve tribes” signifies for all in general; “and thou shalt make upon the breastplate chains of the border” signifies the conjunction of the whole heaven in the extremes; “with cord-work” signifies indissoluble; “of pure gold” signifies through celestial good; “and thou shalt make upon the breastplate two rings of gold” signifies the sphere of Divine good from the higher part of heaven, through which there is conjunction; “and shalt put the two rings on the two extremities of the breastplate” signifies in the extremes; “and thou shalt put the two cords of gold on the two rings” signifies the method of the indissoluble conjunction; “at the two extremities of the breast plate” signifies in the extremes; “and the two extremities of the two cords thou shalt put on the two settings” signifies the method of conjunction with the supports in the extremes; “and shalt put them on the shoulders of the ephod” signifies in this way the support of heaven and the preservation of good and truth there with all exertion and power; “over against the faces thereof” signifies eternally; “and thou shalt make two rings of gold” signifies the sphere of Divine good; “and thou shalt put them upon the two extremities of the breastplate” signifies in the extremes; “upon the edge thereof which is toward the side of the ephod inward” signifies the conjunction and preservation of the middle part; “and thou shalt make two rings of gold” signifies the sphere of Divine good; “and shalt put them on the two shoulders of the ephod underneath” signifies the preservation of good and truth in the lowest part of heaven; “over against its faces” signifies eternally; “opposite to the joining thereof, above the girdle of the ephod” signifies where there is a conjunction of all things most nearly within the external bond, by means of which all things are held there in connection and in form; “and they shall bind the breastplate by the rings thereof unto the rings of the ephod” signifies the conjunction and preservation of all things of heaven by means of the sphere of Divine good in the externals of the spiritual kingdom; “with a thread of blue” signifies by means of the celestial love of truth; “that it may be upon the girdle of the ephod” signifies that it may be preserved forever in its connection and its form; “and that the breastplate withdraw not from upon the ephod” signifies that all things of heaven are inseparable from the externals of the spiritual kingdom; “and Aaron shall carry the names of the sons of Israel” signifies the preservation by the Lord of good and truth in respect to all their quality; “in the breastplate of judgment” signifies a representative of heaven as to Divine truth shining forth from the Divine good of the Lord; “upon his heart” signifies from the Divine love to eternity; “when he goeth in unto the holiness” signifies in all worship; “for a remembrance before Jehovah continually” signifies from mercy eternally; “and thou shall put unto the breastplate of judgment the Urim and Thummim” signifies the shining forth of Divine truth from the Lord in ultimates; “and they shall be upon Aaron’s heart” signifies from the Divine good of His Divine love; “when he goeth in before Jehovah” signifies in all worship; “and Aaron shall carry the judgment of the sons of Israel” signifies the Divine truth of heaven and of the church; “upon his heart before Jehovah continually” signifies perpetually shining forth from good.

AC (Potts) n. 9857 sRef Num@27 @21 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @15 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @30 S1′ 9857. And thou shalt make a breastplate of judgment. That this signifies that which has regard to Divine truth shining forth from Divine good, is evident from the signification of “the breastplate,” as being Divine truth shining forth from the Divine good of the Lord in ultimates (see n. 9823). It is called “a breastplate of judgment,” because it gave answers, and thereby revealed Divine truth. Moreover, by “judgment” in the Word is signified Divine truth, consequently doctrine and life according to doctrine. From this then it is that this breastplate is called “a breastplate of judgment,” and also “judgment,” in what follows in this chapter-“Aaron shall carry the judgment of the sons of Israel upon his heart before Jehovah continually” (verse 30). And when Joshua was chosen to be leader over the people, it is said, “he shall stand before Eleazar the priest, who shall inquire for him by the judgment of Urim before Jehovah” (Num. 27:21).
sRef Isa@5 @7 S2′ [2] That “judgment” denotes Divine truth and the intelligence thence derived, consequently that it denotes doctrine and life according to doctrine, is evident from many passages in the Word; as from the following:
The vineyard of Jehovah Zebaoth is the house of Israel. He looked for judgment but behold an abscess; for righteousness, but behold a cry (Isa. 5:7).
“To look for judgment” denotes intelligence from Divine truth, and a life according to the commandments. Again:
He sat upon a throne in truth, in the tabernacle of David, judging, and seeking judgment (Isa. 16:5);
speaking of the coming of the Lord; “the throne upon which He was to sit” denotes the Divine truth proceeding from Him, and hence the spiritual kingdom (see n. 2129, 5313, 6397, 8625, 9039); “to judge judgment” denotes to teach Divine truth, and “to seek judgment” denotes its reception with man.
sRef Isa@28 @6 S3′ sRef Isa@33 @5 S3′ sRef Isa@28 @5 S3′ [3] Again:
In that day shall Jehovah be for a diadem of ornament to the remains of the people; and for a spirit of judgment to him that sitteth upon judgment (Isa. 28:5, 6)
“A diadem of ornament,” when said of Jehovah, that is, the Lord, denotes Divine intelligence (see above, n. 9828); and “the spirit of judgment” denotes wisdom from Divine truth (n. 9818); “he that sitteth upon judgment” denotes one who instructs about Divine truth, that is, teaches it. Again:
Jehovah hath filled Zion with judgment and righteousness (Isa. 33:5);
“Zion” denotes the celestial church; “being filled with judgment” denotes intelligence from Divine truth, and “being filled with righteousness” denotes wisdom from Divine good.
sRef Jer@8 @7 S4′ sRef Isa@40 @14 S4′ sRef Isa@40 @13 S4′ sRef Jer@8 @8 S4′ [4] Again:
Who hath directed the Spirit of Jehovah? With whom took He counsel, that he might make Him intelligent, and instruct Him in the way of judgment, and teach Him knowledge, and show Him the way of intelligence? (Isa. 40:13, 14);
“the Spirit of Jehovah” denotes the Divine truth (n. 9818); that “instructing Him in the way of judgment” denotes to render Him knowing, intelligent, and wise, is plain. In Jeremiah:
The stork in heaven knoweth her appointed times, but the people of Jehovah know not the judgment of Jehovah. How say ye, We are wise, and the law of Jehovah is with us? (Jer. 8:7, 8).
Here “not to know the judgment of Jehovah” denotes not to know Divine truth, from which is wisdom; therefore it is said, “how say ye, We are wise?”
sRef Amos@6 @12 S5′ sRef Hos@2 @20 S5′ sRef Hos@2 @19 S5′ sRef Jer@22 @13 S5′ sRef Amos@5 @24 S5′ [5] Again:
Woe to him that buildeth his house without righteousness, and his chambers without judgment (Jer. 22:13);
“to build chambers without judgment” denotes to be imbued with things not true. In Hosea:
I will betroth thee to Me forever in righteousness and in judgment, and I will betroth thee to Me in truth (Hos. 2:19-20).
“To betroth in judgment” denotes to conjoin by means of Divine truth, thus by means of faith and a life of faith.
In Amos:
Let judgment flow like water, and righteousness as a mighty torrent (Amos 5:24).
Ye turn judgment into gall, and the fruit of righteousness into wormwood (Amos 6:12);
where also “judgment” denotes intelligence from Divine truth, and the consequent life.
sRef Ps@119 @149 S6′ sRef Zeph@3 @5 S6′ sRef Ps@37 @6 S6′ sRef Ps@36 @6 S6′ sRef Deut@32 @4 S6′ sRef Ps@36 @5 S6′ [6] In Zephaniah:
In the morning will Jehovah give His judgment for light (Zeph. 3:5);
“to give judgment for light” denotes to reveal Divine truth. Again:
All the ways of Jehovah are judgment (Deut. 32:4).
Thy truth, O Jehovah, reacheth unto the skies; Thy righteousness is like the mountains of God; Thy judgments are a great deep (Ps. 36:5, 6).
Jehovah shall bring forth thy righteousness as the light, and thy judgment as the noonday (Ps. 37:6).
Hear my voice according to Thy mercy; O Jehovah, quicken me according to Thy judgments (Ps. 119:149).
In these passages “judgment,” and “judgments,” denote Divine truth.
sRef Isa@9 @7 S7′ sRef Isa@16 @5 S7′ sRef Isa@5 @16 S7′ sRef Luke@11 @42 S7′ sRef Isa@16 @3 S7′ [7] In Luke:
Woe unto you Pharisees, ye pass by judgment and the love of God; these ought ye to do (Luke 11:42).
“To pass by the judgment of God” denotes to pass by Divine truth; and “to pass by the love of God” denotes to pass by Divine good, and the life from both. As life also is meant, it is said “these things ought ye to do.” In Isaiah:
Jehovah Zebaoth shall be exalted in judgment, and God shall be sanctified in righteousness (Isa. 5:16).
Upon the throne of David, to establish the kingdom in judgment and in righteousness, from henceforth and even forever (Isa. 9:7).
Bring forth counsel, do ye judgment; make thy shadow like the night in the midst of the noonday (Isa. 16:3);
“to do judgment” denotes to act according to Divine truth.
sRef Isa@42 @1 S8′ sRef Ezek@18 @9 S8′ sRef Jer@23 @5 S8′ sRef Isa@42 @4 S8′ sRef Ezek@18 @5 S8′ sRef Zeph@2 @3 S8′ [8] Again:
I will raise unto David a righteous branch, and He shall do judgment and righteousness in the earth (Jer. 23:5; 33:15).
If a man be righteous, and do judgment and righteousness, and walk in My statutes, and keep My judgments, to do the truth; he is righteous, he shall surely live (Ezek. 18:5, 9).
Seek ye Jehovah, all ye meek of the earth, who have done His judgment (Zeph. 2:3).
“To do the judgment of God” denotes to do the Divine truth, that is, to do according to it. In Isaiah:
I have put My Spirit upon Him, He shall bring forth judgment to the nations. He shall not extinguish, nor break, till He have set Judgment in the earth (Isa. 42:1, 4);
speaking of the Lord; “to bring forth judgment to the nations,” and “to set judgment in the earth” denotes to teach Divine truth, and set it up in the church.
sRef Jer@30 @13 S9′ sRef Isa@51 @4 S9′ sRef Jer@4 @2 S9′ sRef John@9 @39 S9′ [9] Again:
A law shall go forth from Me, and I will raise up My judgment for a light of the peoples (Isa. 51:4);
where “judgment” denotes Divine truth, “for a light of the peoples” denotes for enlightenment. In John:
For judgment I am come into this world, that those who see not may see; and that those who see may become blind (John 9:39).
“To come into the world for judgment” denotes to reveal Divine truth, which causes those to see who are wise from the Lord, and those to be blind who are wise from themselves, thus who pass for being learned.
sRef Ezek@5 @10 S10′ sRef Ezek@5 @7 S10′ sRef Ezek@5 @8 S10′ sRef Ezek@5 @15 S10′ sRef Ezek@5 @6 S10′ sRef Jer@48 @21 S10′ sRef Ps@89 @14 S10′ [10] Again:
Swear by the living Jehovah in truth, in judgment, and righteousness (Jer. 4:2).
There is none that judgeth judgment for health; thou hast no medicines for recovery (Jer. 30:13).
Righteousness and judgment are the support of Thy throne; mercy and truth are before Thy faces (Ps. 89:14);
where “righteousness” denotes the good which is of mercy; and “judgment” the truth which is of faith; wherefore it is said, “mercy and truth.” In Ezekiel:
Jerusalem hath changed My judgments into wickedness more than the nations, and My statutes more than the lands; therefore I will do judgments on thee in the eyes of the nations, and I will scatter all thy remains (Ezek. 5:6-8, 10, 15).
“To change judgments” denotes the truths which are of the civil state (that these are signified by “judgments,” when “statutes” also are mentioned, see n. 8972); but “doing judgments” denotes to judge either to death, which is damnation; or to life, which is salvation. Salvation or damnation is also signified by “judgment,” where “the day of judgment,” or “hour of judgment,” is mentioned (Matt. 11:22, 24; 12:36, 41, 42; Luke 10:14; 11:31, 32; John 5:28-29; Rev. 14:7; 18:10); the same is also signified by “judgment,” where the office of a judge is treated of (Matt. 5:21, 22; 7:1, 2; 23:14, 33; John 5:24, 26, 27; 7:24; 8:15, 16; 12:31, 47, 48; Luke 6:37; 12:13, 14, 56, 57; 19:21, 22, 27; 20:47; 22:30; Mark 12:40; Isa. 41:1; 3:14; Jer. 25:31; 48:21; Joel 3:12; Ps. 7:8, 9; 9:4, 7, 8; Lev. 19:15; Deut. 1:16, 17; 25:1; Rev. 17:1; 18:10; 20:12, 13).

AC (Potts) n. 9858 sRef Ex@28 @15 S0′ 9858. With the work of a thinker.* That this signifies from the intellectual part, is evident from the signification of “a thinker,”* as being the understanding (see n. 9598, 9688). It is said from the intellectual part, because the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, which is represented by Aaron’s garments, is the intellectual part of heaven, even as the celestial kingdom is its will part. (That the intellectual and will parts with man correspond to these heavens, see n. 9835.)
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9859 sRef Ex@28 @15 S0′ 9859. Like the work of the ephod thou shalt make it. That this signifies what is continuous with the external of the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the representation of the ephod, as being Divine truth in the spiritual kingdom in an external form, in which the interior things cease (see n. 9824); consequently it denotes the external of this kingdom; its continuity is signified by “like the work of the ephod” (as in n. 9838).

AC (Potts) n. 9860 sRef Ex@28 @15 S0′ 9860. Of gold, of blue and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed and fine twined linen, shalt thou make it, signifies the good of charity and of faith (as above, n. 9687, 9832, 9833).

AC (Potts) n. 9861 sRef Ex@28 @16 S0′ 9861. Foursquare it shall be, doubled. That this signifies what is righteous and perfect, is evident from the signification of “foursquare,” as being what is righteous (see n. 9717). That it also means what is perfect, is because it was doubled, and that which is doubled involves all things of good and all things of truth. That which is on the right side involves the good from which is truth, and that which is on the left side involves the truth which is from good (n. 9495, 9604, 9736), thus the perfect conjunction of both is involved. It is also from this that “two” signifies conjunction (n. 8423), and also each and all things (n. 9166), as likewise what is full (n. 9103).

AC (Potts) n. 9862 sRef Ex@28 @16 S0′ 9862. A span the length thereof, and a span the breadth thereof. That this signifies equally as to good and as to truth, is evident from the signification of “length,” as being good (see n. 1613, 9487); and from the signification of “breadth” as being truth (n. 1613, 3433, 3434, 4482, 9487); equally from both is signified by the length and the breadth being equal.

AC (Potts) n. 9863 sRef Ex@28 @17 S0′ 9863. And thou shalt fill it with a filling of stone. That this signifies the truths themselves in their order from one good, is evident from the signification of “the breastplate,” which is what was to be filled, as being Divine truth shining forth from the Divine good of the Lord (see n. 9823); and from the signification of “a filling of stone,” as being truths in their order; for the breastplate was filled with stones according to the names of the sons of Israel; and by “stones” in a general sense are signified truths in the ultimate of order (n. 114, 643, 1298, 3720, 6426, 8609); and by “precious stones,” such as were in the breastplate, are signified truths shining from good (n. 9476). It is said “from one good,” because there is one good from which are all truths. This good is the good of love within the Lord, thus the Lord Himself; and consequently it is the good of love from the Lord, which is the good of love within the Lord; for the good which flows in from the Lord into man, spirit, or angel, appears as if it were theirs; consequently love within the Lord is love from the Lord. This good is the one only good from which are all truths, and from which is the order among truths, for truths are forms of good.
sRef Rev@21 @19 S2′ sRef Rev@21 @20 S2′ [2] That the precious stones which were in the breastplate signified Divine truths from Divine good, is evident from the passages in the Word where precious stones are mentioned; as with John in Revelation:
The foundations of the wall of the city New Jerusalem were adorned with every precious stone. The first foundation was jasper; the second, sapphire; the third, chalcedony; the fourth, emerald; the fifth, sardonyx; the sixth, sardius; the seventh, chrysolite; the eighth, beryl; the ninth, topaz; the tenth, chrysoprase; the eleventh, jacinth; the twelfth, amethyst (Rev. 21:19, 20).
That these precious stones signify the truths of the church, which are truths Divine, is evident from the signification of “the city New Jerusalem,” of its “wall,” and “the foundations of the wall.” “The New Jerusalem” signifies the New Church which will succeed our present church; for the book of Revelation treats of the state of the church as it is now, even to its end; and then of the New Church, which is the holy Jerusalem coming down out of heaven; its “walls” denote the truths of faith which defend; and its “foundations” denote truths from good; these truths themselves in their order are designated by the precious stones there named. Everyone can see that Jerusalem is not to come down out of heaven, and that the rest of what is said about it will not happen as described; but that in each particular of the description such things are signified as pertain to the church. That the truths of faith are meant by “the foundations of its wall,” is evident from the fact that these truths are what protect the church from every attack, even as walls protect a city. (That “Jerusalem” denotes the church, see n. 2117, 9166; and that “walls” denote the truths of faith that protect the church, n. 6419; and that “foundations” denote truths from good, n. 9643.)
sRef Ezek@28 @12 S3′ sRef Ezek@28 @13 S3′ sRef Ezek@28 @14 S3′ [3] In Ezekiel:
Son of man, take up a lamentation upon the king of Tyre, and say to him, Thus said the Lord Jehovih, Thou art full of wisdom, and perfect in beauty. Thou hast been in Eden the garden of God; every precious stone was thy covering, the ruby, the topaz, and the diamond, the tarshish [beryl], the onyx, and the jasper, the sapphire, the chrysoprase, and the carbuncle, and gold. Thou hast been in the mountain of holiness of God; thou hast walked in the midst of the stones of fire (Ezek. 28:12-14).
Here also by “the precious stones” are signified truths from good; for in the internal representative sense “Tyre” denotes one who is in intelligence and wisdom from the knowledges of good and truth (n. 1201) therefore it is said of its king that he is “full of wisdom and perfect in beauty,” “wisdom” being predicated of good, and “beauty” of truth; for all the wisdom in the heavens is from good, and all the beauty there is from the truths thence derived. “Eden the garden” signifies intelligence from good (n. 100); “the garden,” intelligence itself (n. 100, 108, 2702). From this it is evident that by the “stones” there mentioned are signified truths from good.
[4] But what truths from good are signified by each of the stones in the breastplate, will be seen from what follows. That all truths and goods in the complex are signified, is evident from the fact that there were twelve stones, and that on them were inscribed the names of the sons of Israel, that is, of the tribes; for by “the twelve tribes” are signified the goods and truths of heaven and of the church in the whole complex (n. 3858, 3926, 3939, 4060, 6335, 6337, 6397); and that from this they signified heaven with all the societies there (n. 7836, 7891, 7996, 7997); also that they signified various things according to the order in which they are mentioned in the Word (n. 3862, 3926, 3939, 4603, 6337, 6640); and that “twelve” denotes all things (n. 3272, 3858, 7973).

AC (Potts) n. 9864 sRef Ex@28 @17 S0′ 9864. Four rows of stones, a row. That this signifies the conjunction of all, namely, of truths from good, is evident from the signification of “four,” as being conjunction (see n. 1686, 9601, 9674); and from the signification of “rows of stones,” as being truths from good in their order. That there were four rows, and in each row three stones, was in order that there might be represented the conjunction of all truths from one good, and thereby perfection; for by “four” is signified conjunction (as said above), and by “three,” perfection (n. 9825); for when there is one good from which all truths proceed (n. 9863), and to which therefore all look, then this one good is the conjunction of all.
[2] That it is so may be illustrated by what exists in the heavens. All in the heavens without exception turn their faces to the Lord, and wonderful to say, this is the case to whatsoever quarter they may turn. It is from this that all who are in the heavens are conjoined as a one. But those who are outside heaven turn their faces backward from the Lord, and the more so the more remote from heaven they are; consequently with them there is disjunction, because with them there is no love toward God and toward the neighbor; but love toward self and the world. But this secret is incredible to those who think according to the fallacies of the senses; for these cannot comprehend how in every change of position the direction of all faces in heaven can possibly be constantly to the Lord, who is the Sun there. (See what was adduced above on this subject, n. 9828.).

AC (Potts) n. 9865 sRef Ex@28 @17 S0′ 9865. A ruby, a topaz, and a carbuncle. That hereby is signified the celestial love of good, is evident from the signification of these stones, as being the good of celestial love. Celestial love is love to the Lord from the Lord. That these stones signify this love is on account of their red and flaming color, and “red” signifies love (see n. 3300), in like manner what is “flaming” (see n. 3222, 6832, 7620, 7622, 9570); here celestial love is signified, because they are in the first row; and those which are in the first row correspond to things in the inmost heaven, where reigns celestial love, that is, love to the Lord. As the twelve stones in the breastplate represented all truths from good, they consequently also represented the whole heaven; for heaven is heaven from the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good. The angels who constitute heaven are receptions of this. Hence it is that the three stones which were in the first row represent the inmost heaven, consequently the love which is there, which is called the celestial love of good, and the celestial love of truth; the stones that were in the first row representing the celestial love of good, and those in the second row the celestial love of truth. That these stones represent this love is due to their color, as before said; for precious stones have a representation according to their colors.
[2] In the heavens appear colors of unspeakable beauty, because they are modifications of heavenly light, and heavenly light is the Divine truth proceeding from the Lord. From this it is evident that colors are presented to view there according to the variations of good and truth; thus they are modifications of the light that proceeds from the Lord through the angels. The light that proceeds from the Lord appears in the inmost heaven like flame; and therefore the colors which come from it are red and flashing. But the same light appears in the middle heaven like a bright white light; and therefore the colors which come from it are of a bright white color, and insofar as they have good in them they sparkle. It is from this that there are two fundamental colors, to which all the rest bear relation; namely, the color red, and the color white; and that a red color is representative of good, and a white one of truth (n. 9467).
sRef Job@28 @19 S3′ [3] This shows why stones of so many colors were set in rows in the breastplate; namely, in order that they might represent in their order all the goods and truths which are in the heavens; consequently the universal heaven. The stones of the first row, which were a ruby, a topaz, and a carbuncle, represented the celestial love of good, because they partake of red. Moreover, the ruby, which is in the first place, derives its name in the original tongue from a word which signifies redness; and the carbuncle, which is in the third place, in the same tongue is derived from a term which signifies a flashing as from fire. But from what word the topaz, which is in the middle place, is derived, is not known; that it was from flaming red color is probable. Accordingly in Job the like is said of it as of gold:
The topaz of Ethiopia shall not vie with wisdom, neither shall it be valued with pure gold (Job 28:19).
“Gold” also denotes the good of love (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 8932, 9490, 9510).

AC (Potts) n. 9866 sRef Ex@28 @17 S0′ 9866. Row one. That this signifies a trine therein as a one, is evident from the signification of a “row,” as being a trine, for three stones constituted it, and “three” signifies what is complete from beginning to end (see n. 2788, 4495, 7715, 9198, 9488). It is said, “as a one,” because a one comes forth from three in successive order, for the consequent simultaneous order that comes-forth from these three when in order side by side, corresponds to the successive things from which they have come-forth, and from which they subsist (n. 9825). It is from this that the three heavens are a one in ultimates, and in like manner each heaven. This has its origin in the Divine Itself, in which is a Trine; namely, the Divine Itself, the Divine Human, and the Divine which proceeds; and these are a One. This Trine itself, and the One Divine, is the Lord. From all this it can be seen why in each row there were three stones, and that by each row is signified a trine as a one. There were four rows for the reason that there are two kingdoms in the heavens, the celestial kingdom and the spiritual kingdom, and in each an internal and an external. The internal and the external of the celestial kingdom were represented by the two rows on the right side of the breastplate; and the internal and the external of the spiritual kingdom, by the two rows on its left side; for the breastplate was a doubled square.

AC (Potts) n. 9867 sRef Ex@28 @18 S0′ 9867. And the second row. That this signifies this trine also as a one, is evident from what has just been shown. (In general, that everyone comes-forth from the harmony and agreement of many, see n. 457.)

AC (Potts) n. 9868 sRef Ex@28 @18 S0′ 9868. A chrysoprase, a sapphire, and a diamond. That hereby is signified the celestial love of truth, from which are the things which follow, is evident from the signification of these stones, as being the celestial love of truth (of which below). It is said that from this are the things which follow, because all the goods and truths that follow proceed in order from those which go before, for there cannot possibly be anything that is unconnected with the things that are prior to itself. The first in order is the celestial love of good; the second is the celestial love of truth; the third is the spiritual love of good; and the fourth is the spiritual love of truth. This order is what was represented in the rows of stones in the breastplate of judgment, and this is the very order of the goods and truths in the heavens. In the inmost heaven is the celestial love of good, and the celestial love of truth. The celestial love of good is its internal, and the celestial love of truth is its external. But in the second heaven is the spiritual love of good, which is its internal; and the spiritual love of truth, which is its external. The one also flows into the other in the same order, and they constitute as it were a one. From this it is evident what is meant by “from which are the things which follow.”
[2] As regards the stones of this row, these, like the preceding stones, and also all the rest, derive their signification from their colors. (That precious stones have a signification according to their colors, see n. 9865; and that in the heavens colors are modifications of the light and shade there, thus that they are variegations of the intelligence and wisdom with the angels, n. 3993, 4530, 4677, 4742, 4922, 9466; for the light of heaven is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, whence come all intelligence and wisdom.) The stones of the first row signified the celestial love of good, from their redness; but the stones of this row partake of a blue which is from red. For there is a blue from red, and a blue from white; the blue from red inwardly glows from flame; and it is this blue which signifies the celestial love of truth; while the blue from white, such as is in the stones of the next row, which signifies the spiritual love of good, does not inwardly glow from flame, but from light.
sRef Ezek@27 @16 S3′ [3] Whether the chrysoprase, which is the first stone of this row, was of a blue color, cannot be known from its derivation in the original tongue; but that it signifies the celestial love of truth is plain in Ezekiel:
Syria was thy trader by reason of the multitude of thy works; with chrysoprase, crimson, and broidered work (Ezek. 27:16);
speaking of Tyre, by which is signified wisdom and intelligence from the knowledges of good and truth (n. 1201). The chrysoprase is here joined with crimson, and as “crimson” signifies the celestial love of good (n. 9467), it follows that “the chrysoprase” signifies the celestial love of truth; for in the prophetic Word wherever good is treated of, truth of the same kind is also treated of, on account of the heavenly marriage in everything therein (n. 9263, 9314). Moreover, “Syria,” which is “the trader,” signifies the knowledges of good (n. 1232, 1234, 3249, 4112); and the knowledges of good are the truths of celestial love.
sRef Ex@24 @10 S4′ [4] That the sapphire, which is the second stone of this row, is of a blue color, such as is that of the sky, is known; wherefore it is said in the book of Exodus:
Seventy of the elders saw the God of Israel; and there was under His feet as a work of sapphire, and as the substance of heaven in respect to cleanness (Exod. 24:10).
(That this stone signifies what is translucent from interior truths, which are the truths of celestial love, may be seen above, n. 9407.)
[5] But that “the diamond,” which is the third stone of this row, denotes the truth of celestial love, is from its transparency, which verges toward an inward blueness; for in this way the colors of the stones of this row, and also those of the former one, shine through this stone, because it is the last one, and communicate with those which are in the following row. The case is the same with the good and truths in the inmost heaven, in regard to the good and truths in the following heavens; for these derive their life of charity and of faith from the former by communication, as it were by a shining through.

AC (Potts) n. 9869 sRef Ex@28 @19 S0′ 9869. And the third row, signifies a trine also in this case as a one (as above, n. 9866).

AC (Potts) n. 9870 sRef Ex@28 @19 S0′ 9870. A cyanus, an agate, and an amethyst. That this signifies the spiritual love of good, is evident in like manner from their color; for a blue color that is derived from white signifies spiritual good, or what is the same, the spiritual love of good (of which above, n. 9868). The spiritual love of good is charity toward the neighbor, and the spiritual love of truth is faith from charity; of that good and this truth the second heaven consists; its internal being the good of charity, and its external the good of faith. That the cyanus, as well as the amethyst, is of a blue color, is known; that the agate is so likewise, is not so well known, for in the original tongue it is not known of what species this stone is, whether an agate, a turquoise, or some other stone.

AC (Potts) n. 9871 sRef Ex@28 @20 S0′ 9871. And the fourth row. That this signifies the last trine as a one, is evident from what has been adduced above (n. 9866).

AC (Potts) n. 9872 sRef Ezek@10 @9 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @20 S0′ 9872. A tarshish [ beryl], and an onyx, and a jasper. That this signifies the spiritual love of truth, in which the higher things cease, is evident from the signification of these stones, which they derive from their colors; for the color of all the stones of this row verges toward a shining white that is from blue. That the tarshish [beryl] signifies the spiritual love of truth, is evident from the passages in the Word where it is mentioned, as in Ezekiel:
Behold four wheels beside the cherubs; and the appearance of the wheels was like a tarshish [beryl] stone (Ezek. 1:16; 10:9);
“the wheels of the cherubs” signify the like as the arms and the feet with man; namely, the power of acting and of advancing, which belongs to truth from good (see n. 8215); it is from this that their appearance was like the tarshish [beryl] stone, for “the tarshish [beryl]” denotes truth from spiritual good, to which belongs power.
sRef Dan@10 @6 S2′ sRef Dan@10 @5 S2′ [2] In Daniel:
I lifted up mine eyes, and saw, and behold a man clothed in linen, and his loins were girded with gold of Uphaz; his body also was like the tarshish [beryl], his face as of lightning, and his eyes as torches of fire (Dan. 10:5, 6);
“the man clothed in linen” was an angel from heaven; “linen” signifies truth which clothes good (see n. 7601); “the loins” signify conjugial love, which belongs to good and truth (n. 3021, 4280, 5050-5062); hence the loins are said “to be girded with the gold of Uphaz,” for “gold” denotes the good of love (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 9490, 9510). But from its correspondence “the body” signifies the good of celestial love, and also the good of spiritual love (see n. 6135); and its external signifies truth from this good; for which reason the angel’s body appeared like a tarshish [beryl]; thus it is evident that a “tarshish [beryl]” denotes the truth of spiritual love.
sRef Rev@21 @18 S3′ sRef Rev@21 @19 S3′ sRef Rev@21 @11 S3′ [3] (That “the onyx,” which is the second stone in this row, signifies the truths of faith from love, was shown above, n. 9476, 9841.) That “the jasper,” which is the third and last stone of this row, signifies the truth of faith, is evident from John in Revelation:
The light of the holy city Jerusalem was like unto a stone most precious, like a jasper stone, like unto a shining crystal (Rev. 21:11);
by “the holy Jerusalem” is signified the church which is to succeed this one of ours; by its “light” is signified the truth of faith and the intelligence thence derived (see n. 9548, 9551, 9555, 9558, 9561, 9684); and therefore it is likened to “a jasper stone like unto a shining crystal;” moreover, a “crystal” denotes the truth of faith from good. Again:
The building of the wall of the holy Jerusalem was jasper; and the city was pure gold, like unto pure glass (Rev. 21:18);
the wall of the city is called “jasper,” because by “the wall” is signified the truth of faith protecting the church (n. 6419); and as this is signified by “the wall,” therefore the first stone of its foundations is said to be jasper (verse 19); for “the foundation” denotes the truth of faith from good (n. 9643).

AC (Potts) n. 9873 sRef Ex@28 @20 S0′ 9873. From all this it can now be seen what was signified by “the twelve precious stones” in the breastplate of judgment, namely, all the goods and truths of heaven in their order. Heaven is divided into two kingdoms, the celestial and the spiritual. The good of the celestial kingdom was represented by the first two rows, which were on the right side of the breastplate; and the good of the spiritual kingdom by the following two rows, which were on the left side. The internal good of the celestial kingdom is the good of love to the Lord, and this good is what is meant by “the celestial love of good;” and the external good of the celestial kingdom is the good of mutual love, and this good is what is meant by “the celestial love of truth.” The internal good of the spiritual kingdom is the good of charity toward the neighbor, and this good is what is meant by “the spiritual love of good;” and the external good of the spiritual kingdom is the good of faith, and this good is what is meant by “the spiritual love of truth” (That goods and truths in this order constitute the heavens, see n. 9468, 9473, 9680, 9683, 9780.)
[2] From this it is now evident what was represented by the twelve stones, which were called “the Urim and Thummim.” But in what manner Divine truths, which were answers, were shown by them, will be told below (n. 9905). That the good of love was in the first place among them, and the truth of faith in the last place, is evident from the first stone, which was a ruby, and the last, which was a jasper; thus from the color of the first stone which was red, and of the last stone which was white, both of them being translucent. (That “red” signifies the good of love, see n. 3300, 9467; and that “white” signifies the truth of faith, n. 3301, 3993, 4007, 5319.)
[3] The like that was signified by the stones in the breastplate was also signified by the materials interwoven in the ephod. The ephod was woven of blue, of crimson, of scarlet double-dyed, and of fine linen, as appears from the sixth verse of the present chapter; and by “the blue” was signified the truth of celestial love, by “the crimson,” the good of celestial love, by “the scarlet double-dyed,” the good of spiritual love, and by “the fine linen,” the truth of spiritual love (n. 9833). The reason was that “the ephod” signified heaven in ultimates, in like manner as “the breastplate” (n. 9824); but the goods and truths are there enumerated in a different order, because “the ephod” signified the spiritual heaven, while “the breastplate” signified the whole heaven from first to last. And as the Habitation with the Tent also represented heaven (n. 9457, 9481, 9485, 9615), therefore the materials of which the curtains and the veils were interwoven consisted in like manner of blue, of crimson, of scarlet double-dyed, and of fine linen (see Exod. 26:1, 31, 36, and 27:16; also n. 9466-9469).
[4] Be it known further that in a general sense “the SAPPHIRE” signifies the external of the celestial kingdom, and “the ONYX” the external of the spiritual kingdom; and as these two stones had this signification, they were the middle stones of the last rows; namely, the sapphire was the middle stone of the second row, and the onyx the middle stone of the fourth row. The stones of the second row signified the external good of the celestial kingdom, which is called “the celestial love of truth,” and the stones of the fourth row signified the external good of the spiritual kingdom, which is called “the spiritual love of truth;” as may be seen from what has been said about them in this article above.
sRef Isa@54 @11 S5′ sRef Ex@24 @10 S5′ [5] That “the sapphire” signifies the external of the celestial kingdom is evident from the passages in the Word where it is mentioned, as in the book of Exodus:
Seventy of the elders saw the God of Israel; and there was under His feet as it were a work of sapphire, and as the substance of heaven in respect to cleanness (Exod. 24:10).
Thus is described the external of the celestial kingdom, for it is said “under His feet,” by which is meant what is external; and where “the God of Israel” is, that is, the Lord, there is heaven. In Isaiah:
O thou afflicted, and tossed with tempests, and not comforted, behold I set thy stones with antimony, and lay thy foundations in sapphires (Isa. 54:11).
In this chapter the subject treated of is the celestial kingdom; “the foundations which are laid in sapphires” denote the external things of this kingdom, for the foundations are laid underneath.
sRef Ezek@1 @26 S6′ sRef Lam@4 @7 S6′ [6] In Jeremiah:
Her Nazirites were whiter than snow; they were brighter than milk, their bones were more ruddy than pearls, a sapphire was their polishing (Lam. 4:7).
The Nazirites represented the celestial man; therefore it is said that “a sapphire was their polishing;” the “polishing” denotes what is external. In Ezekiel:
Above the expanse that was over the head of the cherubs was the likeness of a throne, as the appearance of a sapphire stone; and upon the likeness of the throne was as it were the appearance of a man sitting upon it (Ezek. 1:26; 10:1).
Here also the external of the celestial kingdom is described by “a sapphire;” for that which is above the expanse, or round about it, denotes what is without; the inmost being denoted by “him that sitteth upon the throne.”
sRef Job@28 @16 S7′ [7] As “the sapphire stone” signifies the external of the celestial kingdom, so “the onyx stone” signifies the external of the spiritual kingdom. Therefore this was the stone that was put on the two shoulderpieces of the ephod with the names of the sons of Israel engraved upon it (see verses 9 to 14 of this chapter); for by the ephod was represented the external of the spiritual kingdom (n. 9824). As in a general sense “the onyx” and “the sapphire” signified the external things of the two heavens, they were placed, as before said, in the middle of the three stones of the second and fourth rows; for the middle involves the whole (as was shown above in connection with the robe, by which in a general sense was represented the spiritual kingdom, because it was in the middle, n. 9825). As these two stones involve all that is signified by the rest in these rows, therefore it is said in Job:
Wisdom cannot be compared to the gold of Ophir, to the precious onyx, and the sapphire (Job 28:16).

AC (Potts) n. 9874 sRef Ex@28 @12 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @20 S0′ 9874. They shall be enclosed in gold in their fillings. That this signifies that each and all things, in general and in particular, shall proceed from the good which is of love from the Lord to the Lord, is evident from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 8932, 9490, 9510); and from the signification of their being “enclosed in their fillings,” as being to proceed from it. For each and all of the stones were encompassed and thus enclosed in gold; and as “gold” signifies the good of love, so the enclosing signifies that which is thence derived, or that which proceeds from it; in like manner as is signified by the settings of gold with which the two onyx stones were encompassed, and which were put upon the shoulderpieces of the ephod (verse 11 of this chapter).
[2] The case herein in this. As before shown, the breastplate with the twelve stones represented all the good and truth in the heavens, thus the whole heaven; and not only the heavens, but also all the societies which are in the heavens, and likewise every angel in a society, are encompassed by the Divine sphere, which is the Divine good and truth that proceeds from the Lord (see n. 9490-9492, 9498, 9499, 9534). As the good and truth of this sphere are received by the angels, so also do each and all things with them proceed thence; for every angel is a heaven in the least form. This good itself proceeding from the Lord is what is represented by the gold around the stones, and enclosing them.
[3] That this good is the good of love from the Lord to the Lord, can be seen from the fact that all good is of love; for that which a man loves he calls good, and also feels to be good. From this it is evident that celestial good is the good of love to the Lord, for an angel and a man are conjoined with the Lord by means of this love, and thus are brought to Him, and enjoy all the good of heaven. That this good is from the Lord is known in the church, for its doctrine teaches that all good is from the Divine, and nothing from self. From this it is evident that the good of love to the Lord must be from the Lord, and that good from any other source is not good.

AC (Potts) n. 9875 sRef Ex@28 @21 S0′ 9875. And the stones shall be upon the names of the sons of Israel. That this signifies the goods and truths distinctively in respect to every quality, is evident from the signification of “the stones,” as being the goods and truths distinctively (for each stone signifies some good and truth distinctively, as may be seen above, n. 9865-9872); and from the signification of “the names of the sons of Israel,” as being the same goods and truths in respect to every quality (n. 9842, 9843).

AC (Potts) n. 9876 sRef Ex@28 @21 S0′ 9876. Twelve, upon their names. That this signifies each and all things in the complex, is evident from the signification of “twelve,” as being all (see n. 3272, 3858, 3913, 7973); and from the signification of “the names of the sons of Israel,” as being goods and truths in the complex in respect to every quality (n. 9875).

AC (Potts) n. 9877 sRef Ex@28 @21 S0′ 9877. With the engravings of a signet. That this signifies according to the heavenly form, is evident from the signification of “the engravings of a signet,” as being the heavenly form (see n. 9846). As regards the heavenly form, it is according to this form that all the societies in the heavens, and thus all truths from good, have been set in order; for the angels in the heavens are receptions of truths from good. The Divine good that proceeds from the Lord creates this form. According to this form flow all the affections which are of love, and consequently all the thoughts which are of faith; for according to it these diffuse themselves into the angelic societies, and make a communion. From this it is that those who are in the good of love to the Lord, and from this in the truths of faith, are in a very free state of willing and thinking. But those who are not in this good, and consequently not in the truths thence derived, are in a state of slavery; for they will and think from themselves, and not from the Lord, from whom is this heavenly form. But the nature of this form cannot be comprehended in detail, for the reason that it transcends all understanding.

AC (Potts) n. 9878 sRef Ex@28 @21 S0′ 9878. Everyone upon his name. That this signifies for each in particular, and “that they shall be for the twelve tribes” signifies for all in general, is evident from the signification of “the names of the sons of Israel,” as being goods and truths in respect to every quality (see above, n. 9842, 9843), and as each stone had its name from the tribes, there is also signified that so it shall be for each in particular; and from the signification of “the twelve tribes,” as being all goods and truths in the complex, “twelve” signifying all (n. 3272, 3858, 3913, 7973), and “the tribes” signifying the goods of love and truths of faith in the whole complex (n. 3858, 3926, 3939, 4060, 6335, 6397, 7836, 7891, 7996, 7997), thus all in general.

AC (Potts) n. 9879 sRef Ex@28 @22 S0′ 9879. And thou shalt make upon the breastplate chains of the border. That this signifies the conjunction of the whole heaven in the extremes, is evident from the signification of “the breastplate,” as being the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good (see n. 9823), thus also heaven (of which in what follows); from the signification of “the chains,” as being coherence (see above, n. 9852), thus also conjunction; and from the signification of “the border,” as being what is outermost or extreme (as also above, n. 9853). That “the breastplate” also denotes heaven, is because all goods and truths in the complex were there represented by the twelve stones, and by the names of the twelve tribes; and goods and truths in the complex constitute heaven, insomuch that whether we say heaven, or these goods and truths, it is the same thing. For the angels who constitute heaven are receptions of good and truth from the Lord; and as they are receptions of these, they are also forms of them, which forms are those of love and charity. The truths of faith make beauty, but a beauty that is according to truths from good; that is, according to truths through which good shines. The forms of love and charity, such as are those of the angels in the heavens, are human forms, for the reason that the goods and truths which proceed from the Lord, and of which the angels are receptions, are likenesses and images of the Lord.

AC (Potts) n. 9880 sRef Ex@28 @22 S0′ 9880. With cord-work. That this signifies indissoluble, is evident from the signification of a “cord,” as being conjunction (see above, n. 9854). That indissoluble conjunction is here signified, is because the cord was of twisted and entwined work, as is plain from the original tongue in which such a cord is mentioned. In the spiritual sense that which consists of twisted and entwined work denotes that which is indissoluble.

AC (Potts) n. 9881 sRef Ex@28 @22 S0′ 9881. Of pure gold. That this signifies through celestial good, is evident from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love (see n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 8932, 9490, 9510); and as it is called “pure gold,” it is celestial good which is meant; for there is celestial good, and there is spiritual good, and each both internal and external. Celestial good is the good of love to the Lord, and spiritual good is the good of love toward the neighbor. In the Word all these goods are called “gold,” and are distinguished as “the gold from Uphaz,” “from Ophir,” “from Sheba” and “Havilah,” and also “from Tarshish”-by “the gold from Uphaz” in Jeremiah 10:9; and Daniel 10:5, which denotes celestial good; by “the gold from Ophir” in Isaiah 13:12; Psalm 45:9; and Job 22:24; 28:16, which denotes spiritual good; by “the gold from Sheba” in Isaiah 60:6; Ezekiel 27:22; Psalm 72:15, which denotes the good of knowledges; as also by “the gold from Havilah” in Genesis 2:11, 12; and by “the silver and gold from Tarshish” in Isaiah 60:9, which denote the truth and good of memory-knowledge.

AC (Potts) n. 9882 sRef Ex@28 @22 S0′ 9882. And thou shalt make upon the breastplate two rings of gold. That this signifies the sphere of Divine good from the higher part of heaven through which there is conjunction, is evident from the signification of “the breastplate,” as being a representative of heaven (see n. 9879); and from the signification of “the two rings of gold,” as being the sphere of Divine good through which there is conjunction (n. 9498, 9501). That this is from the higher part of heaven, is signified by the rings being at the upper part of the breastplate, for the chains were led from this part to the settings of gold on the shoulderpieces of the ephod.

AC (Potts) n. 9883 sRef Ex@28 @23 S0′ 9883. And thou shalt put the two rings on the two extremities of the breastplate. That this signifies in the extremes, is evident from the signification of “the two rings,” as being the sphere of Divine good through which there is conjunction (of which just above, n. 9882); from the signification of “the two extremities,” as being the ultimates or extremes; and from the signification of “the breastplate,” as being a representative of heaven (n. 9879). From all this it is evident that by “putting the two rings on the two extremities of the breastplate” is signified the conjunction of the sphere of Divine good in the extremes of heaven.

AC (Potts) n. 9884 sRef Ex@28 @24 S0′ 9884. And thou shalt put the two cords of gold on the two rings. That this signifies the method of the indissoluble conjunction, is evident from the signification of “the cords,” as being an indissoluble conjunction (of which above, n. 9880); from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love (of which also above, n. 9881). But the method of the conjunction is signified by “putting them on the two rings.” From this it is evident that by “putting the two cords of gold on the two rings” is signified the method of the indissoluble conjunction of good with the Divine sphere.

AC (Potts) n. 9885 sRef Ex@28 @24 S0′ 9885. At the extremities of the breastplate. That this signifies in the extremes is evident from what was said above (see n. 9883).

AC (Potts) n. 9886 sRef Ex@28 @25 S0′ 9886. And the two extremities of the two cords thou shalt put on the two settings. That this signifies the method of the conjunction with the supports in the extremes, is evident from the signification of “the extremities,” as being the ultimates or extremes (see above, n. 9883); from the signification of “the cords,” as being an indissoluble conjunction (see n. 9880); the method of the conjunction is signified by “putting them on the settings.” And from the signification of “the settings which were upon the shoulders,” as being a coming-forth and substance (n. 9847, 9851). That they also denote support, is because they were upon the shoulders, and by “the shoulders” are signified things that support, because these support and carry.

AC (Potts) n. 9887 sRef Ex@28 @25 S0′ 9887. And shalt put them on the shoulders of the ephod. That this signifies in this way the support of heaven, and the preservation of good and truth there with all exertion and power, is evident from the signification of “putting on the shoulders of the ephod,” as being the support and preservation of good and truth in the heavens. (That it denotes support, see just above, n. 9886; and that it denotes preservation with all exertion and power, n. 9836.) That it denotes the support of heaven by means of the Divine that proceeds from the Lord, and also the preservation of good and truth there, is because by “the breastplate,” which was fastened by the cords to the shoulderpieces of the ephod, and thereby supported, is signified the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good (n. 9823), thus all the goods and truths in the complex which make heaven (n. 9879).

AC (Potts) n. 9888 sRef Ex@28 @25 S0′ 9888. Over against the faces thereof. That this signifies to eternity, is evident from the signification of “over against the faces,” as being to eternity; for by the “breastplate” is signified heaven and every good and truth that constitutes it (n. 9879). That which is over against the faces there is in the Lord’s perpetual view, thus is preserved to eternity.

AC (Potts) n. 9889 sRef Ex@28 @26 S0′ 9889. And thou shalt make two rings of gold. That this signifies the sphere of the Divine good, is evident from the signification of “the rings,” as being the sphere of Divine good through which there is conjunction (see n. 9882); and from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love (n. 9881).

AC (Potts) n. 9890 sRef Ex@28 @26 S0′ 9890. And thou shalt put them upon the two extremities of the breastplate. That this signifies in the extremes, is evident from the signification of “the extremities,” as being the ultimates or extremes; and from the signification of “the breast plate,” as being a representative of heaven (see n. 9882).

AC (Potts) n. 9891 sRef Ex@28 @26 S0′ 9891. Upon the edge thereof which is toward the side of the ephod inward. That this signifies the conjunction and preservation of the middle part, is evident from the signification of “the edge of the breastplate which is toward the side of the ephod inward” as being conjunction with the middle part of heaven, and thus preservation; for by “the ephod” is signified the Divine truth in the spiritual heaven in the external form (see n. 9824), thus heaven in externals; and “the edge which is toward the side of the ephod inward” denotes the middle part; for the subject treated of is the conjunction of all the goods and truths of heaven with the ultimates there, and from this it treats of the preservation of the whole and of all its parts.
[2] All goods and truths are represented by the twelve stones of the breastplate, and the names of the twelve tribes upon them. The conjunction of these with the ultimates of heaven is represented by the binding of it to the ephod in six places; in two places at the shoulderpieces above; in two at the middle part; and in two at the shoulderpieces underneath above the girdle. By this is representatively exhibited the preservation of the whole of heaven and of all things there.
[3] The conjunction of the breastplate at the shoulderpieces above, represents the preservation there of celestial goods and truths; the conjunction at the edge toward the side of the ephod inward (that is, at the middle part), represents the preservation of spiritual goods and truths; and the conjunction at the shoulderpieces underneath over against the joining above the girdle, represents the preservation of the natural goods and truths which proceed from the two former. For the goods and truths of heaven are in a threefold order; those which are in the highest parts are called “celestial;” those which are in the middle parts are called “spiritual;” and those which are in the lower parts, which proceed from the former, are called “natural” (of which below).

AC (Potts) n. 9892 sRef Ex@28 @27 S0′ 9892. And thou shalt make two rings of gold, signifies the sphere of Divine good (as above, n. 9882, 9889).

AC (Potts) n. 9893 sRef Ex@28 @27 S0′ 9893. And shalt put them on the two shoulders of the ephod underneath. That this signifies the preservation of good and truth in the lowest part of heaven, is evident from the signification of “putting on the shoulders,” as being preservation with all exertion and power (as above, n. 9887); by “underneath” there, is signified the lowest part of heaven, where good and truth are in a natural form (see just above, n. 9891).

AC (Potts) n. 9894 sRef Ex@28 @27 S0′ 9894. Over against its faces, signifies to eternity (as above, n. 9888).

AC (Potts) n. 9895 sRef Ex@28 @27 S0′ 9895. Opposite to the joining thereof, above the girdle of the ephod. That this signifies where there is a conjunction of all things most nearly within the external bond, by which all things are held together in connection and in form, is evident from the signification of “opposite to the joining of the ephod,” as being where there is a conjunction of all the things signified by “the ephod,” which are the goods and truths in the spiritual kingdom in the external form (see n. 9824); and from the signification of “above the girdle of the ephod,” as being most nearly within the external bond, by which all things are held together in connection and in form; for by “above” is signified within, because by higher things are signified interior things (n. 2148, 3084, 4599, 5146, 8325); and by “the girdle of the ephod” is signified the external bond by which all things are held together in connection and in form (n. 9828, 9837). How the case herein is, shall be briefly stated.
[2] That by the binding of the breastplate to the shoulderpieces above, inward, and underneath, is signified the conjunction of all things of heaven, has been shown above (n. 9891); also that by this last binding, which was above the girdle, is signified their preservation in the lowest part, where good and truth are presented in a natural form (n. 9893). That the things which are lowest, or ultimate, hold the higher or interior things together in their connection and form, may be seen above (n. 9828). This lowest or ultimate is represented by the girdle of the ephod (n. 9828, 9837); but that which is most nearly within or above was represented by that which was opposite to the joining above the girdle, where the breastplate was bound to the ephod underneath.

AC (Potts) n. 9896 sRef Ex@28 @28 S0′ 9896. And they shall bind the breastplate by the rings thereof unto the rings of the ephod. That this signifies the conjunction and preservation of all things of heaven by means of the sphere of Divine good in the externals of the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the signification of “binding,” as being conjunction and preservation (of which above, where the binding of the breastplate to the ephod was treated of); from the signification of “the breastplate,” as being a representative of all things of heaven (n. 9879, 9887); from the signification of “the rings,” as being the sphere of Divine good through which there is conjunction (n. 9498, 9501, 9882); and from the signification of “the ephod,” as being Divine truth in the spiritual kingdom in the external form, in which the interior things cease (n. 9824), thus the whole external of this kingdom.

AC (Potts) n. 9897 sRef Ex@28 @28 S0′ 9897. With a thread of blue. That this signifies by means of the celestial love of truth, is evident from the signification of “a thread of blue,” as being the celestial love of truth (see n. 9466, 9687, 9833).

AC (Potts) n. 9898 sRef Ex@28 @28 S0′ 9898. That it may be upon the girdle of the ephod. That this signifies that it may be preserved forever in its connection and in its form, is evident from what was said above (n. 9895).

AC (Potts) n. 9899 sRef Ex@28 @28 S0′ 9899. And that the breastplate withdraw not from upon the ephod. That this signifies that all things of heaven are inseparable from the externals of the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the signification of “not to withdraw,” as being not to be separated; from the signification of “the breastplate,” as being a representative of all things of heaven (see n. 9879, 9887); and from the signification of “the ephod,” as being all the external of the spiritual kingdom (n. 9824, 9896).

AC (Potts) n. 9900 sRef Ex@28 @29 S0′ 9900. And Aaron shall carry the names of the sons of Israel. That this signifies the preservation by the Lord of good and truth in respect to all their quality, is evident from the signification of “carrying,” when said of the breastplate, by which are signified all the goods and truths of heaven (n. 9879, 9887), as being to preserve, for that which is carried upon the breast is preserved (that “to carry” also, when said of the Divine, denotes to hold together in a state of good and truth, see n. 9500, 9737); from the representation of Aaron, as being the Lord in respect to Divine good (see n. 9806); and from the signification of “the names of the sons of Israel,” as being the goods and truths of heaven and of the church in respect to all their quality (n. 9842).

AC (Potts) n. 9901 sRef Ex@28 @29 S0′ 9901. In the breastplate of judgment. That this signifies a representative of heaven in respect to Divine truth shining forth from the Divine good of the Lord, is evident from the signification of “the breastplate of judgment,” as being Divine truth shining forth from the Divine good of the Lord (see n. 9857); and as being a representative of heaven (n. 9879, 9882).

AC (Potts) n. 9902 sRef Ex@28 @29 S0′ 9902. Upon his heart. That this signifies from the Divine love to eternity, is evident from the signification of “the heart,” as being the good of love (see n. 3313, 3635, 3883-3896, 7542, 9050); consequently, when said of the Lord, who is here represented by Aaron, it denotes the Divine love. Consequently “to carry upon the heart” denotes to preserve to eternity from the Divine love.

AC (Potts) n. 9903 sRef Job@19 @9 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @29 S0′ 9903. When he goeth in unto the holiness. That this signifies in all worship, is evident from the signification of “going in unto the holiness,” as being worship; for all Aaron’s ministration at the altar and in the Tent of meeting was called “holiness,” and this ministration was worship.

AC (Potts) n. 9904 sRef Ex@28 @29 S0′ 9904. For a remembrance before Jehovah continually. That this signifies from mercy to eternity, is evident from the signification of “remembrance,” when said of the Divine, as being to preserve or deliver, from mercy (n. 9849); and from the signification of “continually,” as being to eternity.

AC (Potts) n. 9905 sRef Ex@28 @30 S0′ 9905. And thou shalt put unto the breastplate of judgment the Urim and Thummim. That this signifies the shining forth of Divine truth from the Lord in ultimates, is evident from the signification of “the breastplate of judgment,” as being Divine truth shining forth from the Divine good of the Lord (see n. 9857); and from the signification of “the Urim and Thummim,” as being light and the shining forth therefrom. That “the Urim and Thummim” denote light shining forth, is because through the stones in the breastplate the light of heaven shone forth with variety according to the answers that were being given through them. For this reason they were of different colors. For the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good appears before the angels as light, and from it is all the light of heaven. The colors derived from it, which are modifications of this light with the angels, are variegations of intelligence and wisdom with them; for all wisdom and intelligence are from this Divine truth or light. From this it can be seen that by the shining forth of various colors from this light, Divine truths, which are answers, are presented to view in the heavens. In like manner there was a shining forth through the Urim and Thummim, when inquiry was made of the Divine. But be it known that when the shining forth appeared, then at the same time an answer to the subject of inquiry was given in an audible voice. This was done through angels, to whom this answer was revealed by the Lord by means of such a shining forth; for, as before said, Divine truths which are answers appear in this manner in the heavens.
[2] (That the light of heaven is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good, see n. 1053, 1521-1533, 1619-1632, 2776, 3094, 3138, 3167, 3190, 3195, 3222, 3223, 3337, 3339, 3341, 3636, 3643, 3862, 3993, 4060, 4180, 4302, 4408, 4414, 4415, 4419, 4527, 4598, 5400, 6032, 6313, 6315, 6608, 6907, 7174, 8644, 8707, 8861, 9399, 9407, 9570, 9571; and that colors appear in the heavens, and that they are modifications of this light with the angels, thus are variegations of intelligence and wisdom with them, n. 3993, 4530, 4677, 4742, 4922, 9466, 9467, 9865.)
[3] That this is the case, is also evident from the signification of “the Urim and Thummim;” for “Urim” means a shining fire; and “Thummim,” the shining forth therefrom; the “shining fire” denotes the Divine truth from the Divine good of the Lord’s Divine love, and the “shining forth” denotes this same truth in ultimates, thus in the effect. But be it known that in the Hebrew tongue “Thummim” means “integrity;” but in the angelic tongue a “shining forth.” It is said “in the angelic tongue” because the angels converse with one another from the very essence of the subject perceived inwardly within themselves, thus according to its quality. From this the speech flows forth into a conformable sound that is audible to the angels only. The shining forth of the Divine truth is, in sound, “Thummim,” whence comes its name. The like is perceived by the angels when thum is read in the Hebrew tongue, by which is signified what is entire, or integrity. It is from this that by “integrity,”* in the internal sense of the Word, is signified Divine truth in the effect, which is a life according to the Divine commandments (as can be seen from many passages in the Word; as Josh. 24:14; Judges 9:16, 19; Ps. 25:21; 37:37; 84:11; 101:2; 119:1).
[4] From this also it is that the Urim and Thummim are called “the judgment of the sons of Israel,” also “the breastplate of judgment,” and likewise “the judgment of Urim;” for “judgment” signifies Divine truth in doctrine and in life, as may be seen above (n. 9857). From all this it can now be seen that through the Urim and Thummim, that is to say, through the shining forth of the light of heaven, the breastplate revealed Divine truths in the natural sphere, thus in ultimates. There is also a similar shining forth inwardly with those who are in truths from good, which dictates, and as it were gives answers, when truth is sought from the affection of the heart, and when it is loved as good. That there is such a shining forth, whereby Divine truth is revealed from heaven in the natural man, with those who are enlightened from the Word, is not perceived in the world, for the reason that it is not known that any light from heaven enlightens man’s understanding. But that such is the case has been given me to perceive, and also to see. Be it known further that this shining forth appears in ultimates, because all things that belong to light from the Divine descend even to the ultimate bounds; and because they descend to these, they also shine forth there, and from thence. This then is the reason why the breastplate was put upon the ephod, and above its girdle; for the ephod represented Divine truth in ultimates (n. 9824); and its girdle represented a general bond, that all things might be held in connection (n. 9828, 9837). Therefore it is said, “and they shall bind the breastplate by the rings thereof unto the rings of the ephod, that it may be upon the girdle of the ephod, and that the breastplate withdraw not from upon the ephod” (verse 28 of this chapter). The reason why the names of the sons of Israel were also engraved on it, was that the twelve tribes likewise represented all things of Divine good and truth in the heavens, consequently heaven together with all the societies there; and that they represented various things according to the order in which they are mentioned in the Word (see n. 3858, 3862, 3926, 3939, 4060, 4603, 6335, 6337, 6397, 6640, 7836, 7891, 7973, 7996, 7997).
* Rendered “sincerity,” “integrity,” “perfection,” and “uprightness,” in the English Bible. [REVISER.]

AC (Potts) n. 9906 sRef Ex@28 @30 S0′ 9906. And they shall be upon Aaron’s heart. That this signifies from the Divine good of the Lord’s Divine love, may be seen above (n. 9902).

AC (Potts) n. 9907 sRef Ex@28 @30 S0′ 9907. When he goeth in before Jehovah. That this signifies in all worship, is evident from the signification of “going in before Jehovah,” or what is the same thing, “to the holiness,” as being worship (see above, n. 9903).

AC (Potts) n. 9908 sRef Ex@28 @30 S0′ 9908. And Aaron shall carry the judgment of the sons of Israel. That this signifies the Divine truth of heaven and of the church, is evident from the signification of “judgment,” as being Divine truth in doctrine and in life (see n. 9857). As it was the Urim and Thummim which are here called “judgment,” it is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, and that shines forth in ultimates, which is here meant by “judgment,” for the Urim and Thummim have this signification (n. 9905).

AC (Potts) n. 9909 sRef Ex@28 @30 S0′ 9909. Upon his heart before Jehovah continually. That this signifies perpetually shining forth from good, is evident from the signification of “the heart,” as being the good of love (see n. 3313, 3635, 3883-3896, 7542, 9050); and from the signification of “continually,” as being perpetually. The reason why it means shining forth, is that the breastplate was upon the heart, and by “the breastplate” is signified Divine truth shining forth from the Lord’s Divine good (n. 9823).

AC (Potts) n. 9910 sRef Ex@28 @32 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @33 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @31 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @35 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @34 S0′ 9910. Verses 31-35. And thou shalt make the robe of the ephod all of blue. And there shall be a mouth of the head of it in the midst thereof; there shall be a lip for the mouth of it round about, the work of the weaver, as the mouth of a coat of mail it shall be, that it be not rent. And upon the skirts of it thou shalt make pomegranates of blue, and of crimson, and of scarlet double-dyed, upon the skirts thereof round about; and bells of gold in the midst of them round about; a bell of gold and a pomegranate, a bell of gold and a pomegranate, upon the skirts of the robe round about. And it shall be upon Aaron to minister; and the voice thereof shall be heard when he goeth in unto the holiness before Jehovah, and when he goeth out; that he die not. “And thou shalt make the robe of the ephod,” signifies Divine truth in the internal form in the spiritual kingdom; “all of blue,” signifies by means of influx from the good of the celestial kingdom; “and there shall be a mouth of the head of it in the midst thereof,” signifies the method of the influx from what is above; “there shall be a lip for the mouth of it round about,” signifies bounded and closed on every side; “the work of the weaver,” signifies from the celestial; “as the mouth of a coat of mail it shall be, that it be not rent,” signifies thus strong and safe from injury; “and upon the skirts of it thou shalt make,” signifies in the extremes where is what is natural; “pomegranates,” signifies memory-knowledges of good; “of blue, and of crimson, and of scarlet double-dyed,” signifies from the good of charity and of faith; “upon the skirts thereof round about,” signifies in the extremes where the natural is, on every side; “and bells of gold” signifies all things of doctrine and of worship from good passing over to those who are of the church; “in the midst of them round about,” signifies from what is within the memory-knowledges of good on every side; “a bell of gold and a pomegranate, a bell of gold and a pomegranate, upon the skirts of the robe round about,” signifies thus everywhere; “and it shall be upon Aaron,” signifies a representative of the Lord; “to minister,” signifies when engaged in worship and in evangelization; “and the voice thereof shall be heard,” signifies the influx of truth with those who are in the heavens and who are on earth; “when he goeth in unto the holiness before Jehovah, and when he goeth out,” signifies in every state of good and truth in worship; “that he die not,” signifies that the representative does not perish, and therewith the conjunction with the heavens.

AC (Potts) n. 9911 9911. And thou shalt make the robe of the ephod. That this signifies Divine truth in the internal form in the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the signification of “the robe,” as being the spiritual kingdom in general, and specifically Divine truth there in the internal form (see n. 9825).

AC (Potts) n. 9912 9912. All of blue. That this signifies by means of influx from the good of the celestial kingdom, is evident from the signification of “blue” [hyacinthinum], as being the celestial love of truth (see n. 9466), which is the good of mutual love; and the good of mutual love is the external good of the celestial kingdom; for the goods in the heavens proceed in order from the inmosts to the extremes, and they inflow in the same order as they proceed; for to proceed is to flow in. (In what order goods proceed, see n. 9873.) It is this external good of the celestial kingdom that flows into the internal good of the spiritual kingdom, which is signified by “the robe.” From this comes-forth the good of the spiritual kingdom, which is the good of charity toward the neighbor. This is the reason why the robe was all of blue. With regard to the influx of goods, the case is this. There is no good which is good unless it has within it an interior good from which it is; the interior good from which it is makes its essence; whence it is that this interior good exists in the good which follows, almost as the soul exists in its body. It is this following good of which it is said that it proceeds from another good, which is more interior. That the good of charity toward the neighbor proceeds from the good of mutual love, which is a prior or interior good, has been shown several times. The good of mutual love is the external good of innocence, and unless the good of charity has within it the good of innocence, it is not the good of charity (n. 2526, 2780, 3183, 4797, 6765, 7840, 9262), consequently not unless it has within it the good of mutual love. This is the reason why the robe was to be all of blue; for “blue” denotes the good of mutual love, or what is the same thing, the external good of innocence; and “the robe” denotes Divine truth in the internal form in the spiritual kingdom, which is the same thing as the good of charity (n. 9825).

AC (Potts) n. 9913 sRef Ex@28 @32 S0′ 9913. And there shall be a mouth of the head of it in the midst thereof. That this signifies the method of the influx from what is above, is evident from the signification of “the mouth of the head of the robe in the midst thereof,” as being where there is influx from what is above; or what is the same thing, from what is within, thus from the celestial kingdom into the spiritual kingdom. That the external good of the celestial kingdom flows into the internal good of the spiritual kingdom, may be seen just above (n. 9912).
That “the mouth of the head of the robe in the midst thereof” has this signification, is because by “the robe” is signified the spiritual kingdom, and specifically its internal (n. 9825); and by “the neck,” where was the mouth of the head of the robe, is signified the influx, communication, and conjunction of celestial with spiritual things (n. 3542, 5320, 5328); for the head with man corresponds to the Lord’s celestial kingdom, and the body to His spiritual kingdom; consequently the intervening neck, which is encompassed and clothed by the mouth of the head of the robe, corresponds to the intermediation or influx of the celestial kingdom into the spiritual kingdom.
[2] That such things are signified by “the mouth of the head of the robe in the midst thereof,” may seem like an absurdity, especially to those who know nothing of heaven, and of the spirits and angels there, consequently nothing of correspondence. That there is a correspondence of all things in man with all things in the heavens has been shown at the end of many chapters (see the places cited in n. 9280); and also that in general the head corresponds to celestial things, the body to spiritual things, and the feet to natural things (n. 4938, 4939). From this it is plain that by virtue of its correspondence, the neck signifies the influx, communication, and conjunction of celestial with spiritual things. Consequently “the mouth of the head of the robe,” which was made to encompass the neck, signifies the method of this influx; for by Aaron’s garments were represented in general the things that belong to the Lord’s spiritual kingdom (n. 9814). From this it is evident that by the description of its mouth or circuit is described the influx itself. Be it known moreover, that angels and spirits appear clothed in garments; and that each of their garments is representative; as is well known to all who are in the heavens. It is from this that each of Aaron’s garments also was representative of such things as are in the heavens; for the Word that is from the Lord has been so written that there is conjunction by its means. That the man of the church does not know this, in spite of his having such a Word, is because he turns his interiors toward the world, insomuch that he cannot be raised toward heaven, and be instructed (n. 9706, 9707, 9709).

AC (Potts) n. 9914 sRef Ex@28 @32 S0′ 9914. And there shall be a lip for the mouth of it round about. That this signifies that it is bounded and closed on every side, is evident from the signification of “a lip,” or border, round about the mouth or upper opening of the robe, as being that which is bounded and closed on every side; for this “lip,” or border, which was round about, bounded and closed the robe. By this and what presently follows is described the method of the influx of celestial good into spiritual good. That this influx takes place by a method like that with man of the influx of forces from the head through the neck, is evident from what was said in the foregoing article about correspondence.
[2] What the nature of this influx is, shall also be briefly told. All the first things, that belong to the head, that is, to the cerebrum and cerebellum, are gathered together there into little bundles of fibers, and into little nerves, and after being gathered together they are passed down through the neck into the body, and are there diffused in all directions, and move the organs in complete compliance with the will, which begins in the brains. Similar also is the downflow and inflow of powers and forces from the celestial kingdom (which is the head in the Grand Man, that is, in heaven) into the spiritual kingdom (which is like the body there). This influx is also what is meant and described by “the mouth of the head of the robe in the midst,” and its bounding termination by “the lip round about.” It is for this reason that by “the lip of its mouth” is signified what is bounded and closed on every side. The bounding itself is now described.

AC (Potts) n. 9915 sRef Ex@28 @32 S0′ 9915. The work of the weaver. That this signifies from the celestial, is evident from the signification of “the work of the weaver,” as being from the celestial. By “work” is signified that which is done, or which comes-forth, thus that which is from something else; and “the weaver” denotes one who causes the thing to be, or to come-forth; thus he denotes the celestial, because the spiritual comes-forth from and through the celestial. (That the good of the celestial kingdom flows into the good of the spiritual kingdom, and causes this good to come forth, was shown above, n. 9913, 9914.) Whether we say “the good of the celestial kingdom,” or “the celestial,” it is the same thing; for the celestial is the good of the celestial kingdom. The case is similar with “the good of the spiritual kingdom,” and “the spiritual.” What the good of the celestial kingdom or the celestial is, and what the good of the spiritual kingdom or the spiritual is may be seen from the passages cited in n. 9277.)
[2] There are three things in the heavens which follow on in order; namely, the celestial, the spiritual, and the natural; the celestial makes the inmost heaven, the spiritual the middle heaven, and the natural which proceeds from the spiritual makes the ultimate heaven. These same three things are in man, and in him they follow on in the same order as in the heavens; for a regenerated man is a heaven in the least form, corresponding to the Grand Man (n. 9279). But the faculties which receive these three things are called the will, the understanding, and the memory-knowledge by virtue of which is the thought or imagination of the external or natural man. The will receives the celestial, or good; the intellectual receives the spiritual, or truth from this good; and the memory-knowledge which makes the understanding of the natural man, brings the two former to a close. These three are signified in the Word by “the embroiderer,” “the thinker,”* and “the weaver.” (That “the embroiderer,” or “the embroidered work” denotes memory-knowledge, see n. 9688; also that “the thinker,”* or that which is thought, denotes the understanding, n. 9598, 9688.) Thus “the weaver” denotes the will. The reason why “the weaver” denotes the will is that the will flows into the understanding, and weaves it, insomuch that the things which are in the understanding are woven fabrics from the will; for that which the will wills, it forms so as to appear to the sight in the understanding. This sight is thought, consequently by “the thinker”* is signified the understanding.
[3] As by Aaron’s garments was represented the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom (n. 9814); and as the celestial kingdom corresponds to the will in man, and the spiritual kingdom to the understanding in him (n. 9835), therefore in application to garments mention is made of “the work of the embroiderer,” of “the thinker,”* and of “the weaver,” and by these are signified things which are from the faculty of memory-knowledge, from the understanding, and from the will; or what is the same, from the natural, the spiritual, and the celestial.
sRef Ex@35 @35 S4′ [4] That such things are signified, can be seen by all who believe that the Word is Divine, and that it therefore contains within it things that belong to the Lord, to heaven, and to the church; for these things are Divine. Apart from these, what purpose would be served by Jehovah Himself declaring of what, and by what work, the garments of Aaron should be made? and which of them should be the work of the embroiderer, which the work of the thinker,* and which the work of the weaver? All these particulars are distinctly mentioned in what follows in the book of Exodus in these words:
Them hath He filled with wisdom of heart, to do all the work of the workman, and of the thinker,* and of the embroiderer; in blue, and in crimson, and in scarlet double-dyed; and of the weaver, even of them that do all work, and of those who think thoughts (Exod. 35:35).
“The workman” here denotes Divine celestial good, from which is the will of the regenerated man (n. 9846); his “work” is mentioned in the first place, because it is immediately from the Divine; and from celestial good all things are mediately born and proceed.
* skilled craftsman

AC (Potts) n. 9916 sRef Ex@28 @32 S0′ 9916. As the mouth of a coat of mail it shall be, that it be not rent. That this signifies thus strong and safe from injury, is evident from the signification of “a coat of mail,” as being what is strongly woven together; wherefore it is said, “that it be not rent,” that is, that it be safe from injury. Something thus woven together is signified by this term in the original tongue. An idea of what is thus woven together can be had from correspondence; for in the internal sense there is here treated of the influx of celestial good into spiritual good. It is this influx which is signified by “the mouth of the head of the robe,” and is described by “the work of the weaver,” and “of a coat of mail;” and to this influx from the heavens corresponds in man the influx of life from the head through the neck into the body (n. 9913, 9914). And because to this influx corresponds the woven fabric of the neck which is of strong sinews; and lower down a kind of interwoven circle of bones; through both of which the influx is rendered safe from all injury, therefore, as before said, an idea can be had of the several expressions in this verse, namely, of what is signified by “the mouth of the head of the robe in the midst,” by “the lip which is round about” it, by “the work of the weaver,” and by “the mouth of the coat of mail” which it had, lest it should be rent. Be it known that all the representatives in nature bear relation to the human form, and have their signification according to this relation (n. 9496); and that all clothing derives its signification from that part of the body which it covers (n. 9827); consequently so also does this upper part of the robe which encompasses and covers the neck.

AC (Potts) n. 9917 sRef Ex@28 @33 S0′ 9917. And upon the skirts of it thou shalt make. That this signifies in the extremes where is what is natural, is evident from the signification of “the skirts of the robe,” as being the extremes where is what is natural. For by “the robe” is specifically signified Divine truth in the spiritual kingdom in its internal form, and in general the spiritual kingdom (see n. 9825); and by “the skirts” which are round about below, are signified the extremes of this kingdom; and the extremes of the spiritual kingdom are natural. For the goods and truths in the heavens follow on in this order: in the highest or inmost heavens are celestial goods and truths; in the middle heavens are spiritual goods and truths; and in the ultimate heavens are natural goods and truths (concerning which succession in the heavens and with man, see what was said above, n. 9915). And because the memory-knowledges of truth and good are in the external or natural man, therefore also pomegranates were placed in the skirts, for by “pomegranates” are signified the memory-knowledges of good; and also among the pomegranates were bells of gold, because by “bells” are signified such things as are from memory-knowledges.
sRef Isa@6 @1 S2′ [2] That “the skirts of the robe” denote the extremes where is what is natural, is evident from the passages of the Word where “skirts” are mentioned, as in Isaiah:
I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and His skirts filled the temple (Isa. 6:1).
By “the throne upon which the Lord was sitting” is signified heaven, and specifically the spiritual heaven (n. 5313, 8625); by “skirts” here are signified Divine truths in the ultimates or extremes, such as are the truths of the Word in the sense of the letter; which are said to “fill the temple” when they fill the church. The like is signified by “the skirts filling the temple” as by “the smoke and cloud filling the tabernacle,” and also the temple, as repeatedly mentioned in the Word. (That by “smoke” is there signified Divine truth in ultimates, such as is the sense of the letter of the Word, see n. 8916, 8918; as also by a “cloud,” n. 4060, 4391, 5922, 6343.)
sRef Matt@9 @22 S3′ sRef Matt@23 @5 S3′ sRef Matt@14 @36 S3′ sRef Matt@9 @20 S3′ [3] That a woman laboring with an issue of blood was made whole when she touched the skirt of the Lord’s garment (Matt. 9:20, 22), and in general that as many as touched the skirt of His garment were made whole (Matt. 14:36; Mark 6:56), signified that health went forth from the Divine extremes or ultimates; for that there are strength and power in the ultimates of good and truth which are from the Divine may be seen above (n. 9836); and also that answers are given there (n. 9905). In Matthew:
Jesus said of the Scribes and Pharisees that they do all their works to be seen of men, that they make broad their phylacteries, and enlarge the skirts of their robes (Matt. 23:5).
It is here very evident that “the skirts of the robe” denote the external things which stand forth to view, and that “enlarging” them denotes to do works outwardly, so that they may appear, or be seen.
sRef Lam@1 @9 S4′ sRef Lam@1 @8 S4′ [4] In Jeremiah:
Jerusalem hath sinned a sin, her uncleanness was in her skirts (Lam. 1:8, 9).
“Uncleanness in the skirts” denotes in the deeds and words, thus in the extremes; for the extremes or outermost things derive their essence from the interior ones; and therefore when the interiors are unclean, the extremes also are unclean, although the uncleannesses may not appear before men; for the reason that men look at the outward form, and therefore do not see the interiors. Nevertheless these uncleannesses that are in the interiors appear before the angels, and in the other life are also uncovered with everyone, because external things are there taken away; consequently it becomes manifest what has been the quality of the works in their essence.
sRef Nahum@3 @5 S5′ [5] In Nahum:
I will uncover thy skirts upon thy faces, and I will show the nations thy nakedness (Nah. 3:5).
“To uncover the skirts upon the faces” denotes to remove external things so that internal ones may appear; for in various ways the external things of the natural man hide the internal things, which are hypocrisies, deceits, lies, hatreds, revenges, adulteries, and other like things; and therefore when the external things are taken away, the internal ones appear in their uncleanness and filthiness.
sRef Jer@13 @22 S6′ sRef Jer@13 @27 S6′ sRef Jer@13 @26 S6′ [6] In Jeremiah:
If thou say in thine heart, Wherefore have these things covered me up? For the multitude of thine iniquity have thy skirts been unveiled, thy heels have suffered violence. I will lay bare thy skirts upon thy faces, that thy disgraces may be seen, even thine adulteries (Jer. 13:22, 26, 27);
speaking of the abominations of Jerusalem; “to unveil the skirts, and lay them bare” denotes to take away the external things which cover, so that the interiors may be seen; for a man learns to counterfeit what is good, honorable, and sincere, for the sake of reputation, honor, and gain, when yet he has evils and falsities of various kinds hidden within. As by “skirts” are signified external things, therefore mention is also made of “heels,” because “the heels” denote the lowest things of the natural (n. 259, 4938, 4940-4951). From all this it can now be seen that by “the skirts of the robe” are signified goods and truths in the ultimates or extremes, which are in the natural world.

AC (Potts) n. 9918 sRef Ex@28 @33 S0′ 9918. Pomegranates. That hereby are signified memory-knowledges of good, is evident from the signification of “pomegranates,” as being the memory-knowledges of good (see n. 9552). That pomegranates were put upon the skirts of the robe, was because “the skirts” signified the ultimates or extremes of heaven and the church, and the ultimates or extremes of the church are memory-knowledges, as is evident from what was said above (n. 9915, 9917), about the successive order of goods and truths in the heavens and with man. The memory-knowledges of good and truth which are signified by “the pomegranates,” are doctrinal things from the Word, which are memory-knowledges insofar as they are in the memory which is in the external or natural man. But when they enter into the memory which is in the internal or spiritual man, as is the case when the man lives according to them, then doctrinal things as to truth become of faith, and doctrinal things as to good become of charity, and are called spiritual. When this is done, they almost vanish out of the external or natural memory, and appear as it were innate, because they are then implanted in the man’s life, like all those things which through daily use have become as it were of his nature. From this it is evident what memory-knowledges are, and what purpose they serve; consequently what purpose the doctrinal things of the church serve so long as they are kept solely in the memory; for so long as they are kept in the memory only, they have a place beneath intelligence and wisdom; and they do not ascend, or enter into the life, until they become of faith and charity in the internal man.

AC (Potts) n. 9919 sRef Ex@28 @33 S0′ 9919. Of blue, and of crimson, and of scarlet double-dyed. That this signifies from the good of charity and of faith, is evident from the signification of these things in n. 9687, 9833. The reason why fine linen was not interwoven, as in the ephod, is that the tunic, which was the inmost garment, was of fine linen; and this for the reason that “fine linen” signifies truth from a celestial origin (n. 5319, 9469), which is spiritual good itself proceeding from celestial good.

AC (Potts) n. 9920 sRef Ex@28 @33 S0′ 9920. Upon the skirts thereof, round about. That this signifies in the extremes where there is what is natural, on every side, is evident from the signification of “the skirts,” as being the extremes where there is what is natural (see above, n. 9917); and from the signification of “round about,” as being on every side; for where “the skirts” signify the extremes, the whole circumference which consists of the skirts, signifies the whole extreme, consequently, everywhere, or on every side.

AC (Potts) n. 9921 sRef Ex@28 @33 S0′ 9921. And bells of gold. That this signifies all things of doctrine and of worship from good passing over to those who are of the church, is evident from the signification of “bells,” as being all things of doctrine and of worship passing over to those who are of the church (of which below); that they are from good is signified by their being of gold, for “gold” signifies good (see n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 8932, 9490, 9510, 9874, 9881, 9884). That “the bells” denote all things of doctrine and of worship passing over to those who are of the church, is because by means of the bells the people heard and perceived the presence of Aaron in his ministration, for by “the people” are signified those who are of the church, and by “Aaron’s ministry” are signified all things of doctrine and of worship; and therefore it is said in what follows:
And they shall be upon Aaron to minister; and the voice thereof shall be heard when he goeth in unto the holiness before Jehovah, and when be cometh out (Exod. 28:35);
from which it is plain what is signified by “the bells.” The reason why these bells were put in the skirts, was that the holy things of doctrine are in the extremes, and the hearing and perception are there, and are from thence (see n. 9824, 9905).

AC (Potts) n. 9922 sRef Ex@28 @33 S0′ 9922. In the midst of them round about. That this signifies from what is within the memory-knowledges of good on every side, is evident from the signification of “in the midst,” as being that which is within (see n. 1074, 2940, 2973, 5897); thus “in the midst,” when said of the hearing and perception of doctrine and of worship, which are signified by “the bells,” denotes from what is within; from the signification of “the pomegranates,” in the midst of which were the bells, as being the memory-knowledges of good (n. 9918); and from the signification of “round about,” as being on every side (as above, n. 9920). The reason why the bells were placed in the midst of the pomegranates, was that the memory-knowledges which are signified by “the pomegranates,” are recipients, and are as it were vessels, of truth and good (n. 1469, 1496, 3068, 5373, 5489, 7770); and the doctrine and worship which are signified by “the bells,” must be from the good and truth which are within the memory-knowledges, as in their vessels; if the doctrine and the worship are not from good and truth, but only from memory- knowledges, they have nothing of life. It is said that the doctrine and worship must be from the good and truth which are within the memory-knowledges; but not from the memory-knowledges apart from the good and truth.
[2] But as few can apprehend how the case herein is, it shall be unfolded to the apprehension insofar as this can be done. All things of the external or natural memory are called “memory-knowledges;” for there is an external memory, which is the memory of things in the natural world; and there is an internal memory, which is the memory of things in the spiritual world (n. 2469-2494, 2831, 5212, 9394, 9723, 9841). The things which have been inscribed on the internal memory are not called memory-knowledges, because they are things of the man’s life; but they are called truths of faith and goods of love. These are the things which must be within memory-knowledges. For there is in man an external, which is called the external man; and an internal, which is called the internal man. The internal must be in the external, as the soul is in its body; thus the things which are in the internal man must be in those which are in the external man, for then there is a soul or life in the latter. Wherefore if there are no internal things, that is, things of the internal man, in the external things, there is no soul, and consequently no life, in them. And as the good of love and of faith is internal, it follows that this good must be in the external things, thus in the memory-knowledges; for as before said, the memory-knowledges are recipients and as it were vessels of internal things. Consequently the doctrine and the worship must be from what is within the recipients or vessels, and they are not in recipients and vessels which are empty or void of what is internal. From all this it is evident how it is to be understood that all things of doctrine and of worship must be from the interior things of the memory-knowledges of good, which is signified by the bells of gold being in the midst of the pomegranates.
[3] Be it known further that there are memory-knowledges of good, and memory-knowledges of truth; and that the truths in them are again vessels recipient of good, for the truths of faith are vessels of the good of love. For the illustration of this subject see what has been already said and shown about memory-knowledges, namely: That memory-knowledges are things of the memory in the natural man (n. 3293, 3309, 3310, 4967, 5212, 5774, 5874, 5886, 5889, 5934): That the internal man is opened by means of memory-knowledges (n. 1495, 1548, 1563, 1895, 1940, 3085, 3086, 5276, 5871, 5874, 5901): That memory-knowledges are means for growing wise, and also means for becoming insane (n. 4156, 4760, 8628, 8629): That memory-knowledges are vessels of truth, and truths are vessels of good (n. 1469, 1496, 3068, 3079, 3318, 5489, 5881, 6023, 6071, 6077, 6750, 7770, 8005, 9394, 9724): That memory-knowledges are of service to the internal man (n. 1486, 1616, 2576, 3019, 3020, 3665, 5201, 5213, 6052, 6068, 6084, 9394): That when memory-knowledges, which are things of the external memory, become of the life, they vanish out of the external memory; but remain inscribed on the internal memory (n. 9394, 9723, 9841): That the man who is in the truths of faith from the good of charity, can be raised above memory-knowledges (n. 6383, 6384): That this is called being raised above the things of the senses (n. 5089, 5094, 6183, 6313, 6315, 9730): That when a man dies he carries with him into the other life the memory-knowledges, that is, the things of the external memory; but that they are then quiescent; and in what manner (n. 2475-2486, 6931).

AC (Potts) n. 9923 sRef Ex@28 @34 S0′ 9923. A bell of gold and a pomegranate, a bell of gold and a pomegranate, upon the skirts of the robe round about. That this signifies thus everywhere and wholly, namely, that the doctrine and the worship must be from what is within the memory-knowledges, is evident from what has been shown just above concerning the bells and the pomegranates. The repetition involves that it must be thus everywhere.

AC (Potts) n. 9924 sRef Ex@28 @35 S0′ 9924. And it shall be upon Aaron. That this signifies a representative of the Lord, is evident from the representation of Aaron, as being a representative of the Lord in respect to the good of love (see n. 9806, 9809); here in respect to those things which concern evangelization and worship; because such things are signified by “the bells in the midst of the pomegranates,” and by “the voice to be heard therefrom when Aaron went in unto the holiness.”

AC (Potts) n. 9925 sRef Ex@28 @35 S0′ 9925. To minister. That this signifies when engaged in worship and in evangelization, is evident from the signification of “ministering,” when said of Aaron, by whom is represented the Lord, as being worship and evangelization. By “worship” is signified everything that is representative of worship from the good of love and the truths of faith; for the worship that is from these is truly worship, whereas worship without these is like a shell without a kernel, and like a body without a soul. And yet such was the worship with the Jewish and Israelitish nation, for this worship merely represented internal things, which, as has been said, are of love and faith. Nevertheless the Lord provided that such worship should be perceived in the heavens, and that thus by means of it there should be effected the conjunction of heaven with man; not indeed through internal things, but through correspondences with external things (on which subject see the places cited in n. 9320, 9380). This is the worship that is signified by “the ministry of Aaron.”
[2] That evangelization is also signified is because by evangelization are meant all things in the Word which treat of the Lord, and all things in worship which represented Him. For evangelization is annunciation about the Lord, His coming, and the things that are from Him which belong to salvation and eternal life. And as all things of the Word in its inmost sense treat solely of the Lord, and all things of worship represented Him, therefore the whole Word is the Evangel, in like manner all worship that was done according to the things commanded in the Word. And because the priests presided over the worship, and likewise taught, therefore by their “ministry” were signified worship and evangelization.

AC (Potts) n. 9926 sRef Ex@28 @35 S0′ 9926. And the voice thereof shall be heard. That this signifies the influx of truth with those who are in the heavens and who are on earth, is evident from the signification of “being heard,” as being reception and perception (see n. 5017, 5471, 5475, 7216, 8361, 9311), consequently also influx, because the things which are received and perceived must flow in; and from the signification of “the voice,” when said of Aaron, by whom is represented the Lord, as being Divine truth (see n. 8813); for “the voice” denotes the annunciation of this truth, and because it denotes its annunciation, it exists with those who are in the heavens and on earth. For Divine truth fills all things of heaven, and makes all things of the church. Such an annunciation was represented by the voice from the bells of gold, when Aaron went in unto the holiness before Jehovah, and when he came out, as is said in what now follows in this verse.
sRef Ps@29 @7 S2′ sRef Ps@29 @9 S2′ sRef Ps@29 @8 S2′ sRef Ps@29 @6 S2′ sRef Ps@29 @4 S2′ sRef Ps@29 @5 S2′ sRef Ps@29 @3 S2′ [2] That in the Word a “voice” signifies the Divine truth which is heard and perceived in the heavens and on earth, is evident from the following passages. In David:
The voice of Jehovah is upon the waters; the voice of Jehovah is in power; the voice of Jehovah is with honor; the voice of Jehovah breaketh the cedars; the voice of Jehovah cleaveth as a flame of fire; the voice of Jehovah maketh the wilderness to tremble; the voice of Jehovah maketh the hinds to calve; but in His temple everyone saith, Glory (Ps. 29:3-9).
In this psalm Divine truth is treated of, in that it destroys falsities and evils; this Divine truth is “the voice of Jehovah;” but the “glory” which is spoken of denotes the Divine truth in heaven and in the church. (That “glory” denotes the Divine truth, see n. 9429; and that the “temple” denotes heaven and the church, n. 3720.)
sRef John@10 @2 S3′ sRef John@10 @3 S3′ sRef John@10 @16 S3′ sRef John@10 @5 S3′ sRef John@10 @26 S3′ sRef John@10 @4 S3′ sRef John@10 @27 S3′ [3] In John:

To Him who is the Shepherd of the sheep the doorkeeper openeth; and the sheep hear His voice. The sheep follow Him, because they know His voice. A stranger they follow not, because they know not the voice of strangers. And other sheep I have, which are not of this fold; them also I must bring, and they shall hear My voice. But ye are not of My sheep, for My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me (John 10:2-5, 16, 26, 27).
That the “voice” here denotes the Divine truth proceeding from the Lord, thus the Word, is very evident; “the voice of strangers” denotes falsity.
sRef Isa@40 @5 S4′ sRef Isa@40 @3 S4′ sRef Isa@40 @6 S4′ sRef Isa@40 @9 S4′ sRef Isa@40 @10 S4′ [4] In Isaiah:
The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of Jehovah, for the glory of Jehovah shall be revealed. The voice saith, Cry. O Zion, that tellest good tidings, get thee up upon the high mountain! O Jerusalem, that tellest good tidings, lift up thy voice with strength! lift it up. Behold the Lord Jehovih cometh in strength (Isa. 40:3, 5, 6, 9, 10; also John 1:23).
“The voice” here denotes annunciation from the Word about the coming of the Lord, thus it also denotes the Divine truth which the Word announces; “the wilderness” denotes the state of the church at that time, which was as it were in the wilderness because the Word was no longer understood; “the glory which shall be revealed” denotes the Word as to its interiors. (That this is meant by “glory,” may be seen above, n. 9429.) That “Jehovah, for whom a way was to be prepared,” and “the Lord Jehovih, who should come in strength,” denote the Lord, is plain, for this is clearly stated.
sRef Isa@52 @8 S5′ sRef Jer@10 @12 S5′ sRef Jer@10 @13 S5′ [5] In Isaiah:
The voice of thy watchmen; they shall lift up the voice when they shall see eye to eye that Jehovah will return to Zion (Isa. 52:8);
“the watchmen” denote those who search the Scriptures concerning the coming of the Lord, their “voice” denotes the Word, which is the Divine truth that is the source. In Jeremiah:
The Maker of the earth by His understanding hath stretched out the heavens. At the voice which He uttereth there is a multitude of waters in the heavens (Jer. 5:12, 13; 51:6).
“The voice” here denotes Divine truth; “waters” denote truths which are in the heavens and from the heavens. (That “waters” in the Word denote truths, see n. 2702, 3058, 3424, 4976, 5668, 9323.)
sRef Rev@1 @15 S6′ sRef Ps@68 @33 S6′ sRef Ps@68 @32 S6′ sRef Joel@2 @11 S6′ sRef John@5 @25 S6′ sRef Joel@3 @16 S6′ sRef Ps@29 @3 S6′ sRef Rev@14 @2 S6′ [6] So also in the following passages:
The voice of the Son of man was like the sound of many waters (Rev.1:15).
I heard a voice from heaven, as the voice of many waters (Rev. 14:2).
The voice of Jehovah is upon the waters, Jehovah is upon great waters (Ps. 29:3).
Jehovah hath uttered His voice before His army, for without number is he that doeth His word (Joel 2:11).
In this passage also “voice” denotes Divine truth, and likewise the Word which they do. Again:
Jehovah shall utter His voice from Jerusalem, so that the heavens and the earth shall shake (Joel 3:16).
Sing psalms unto the Lord, ye kingdoms of the earth, to Him that rideth upon the heaven of heaven of old; lo, He shall utter in a voice a voice of strength (Ps. 68:32, 33).
I say unto you, The hour cometh when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God; and they that hear shall live (John 5:25).
That “the voice” in this passage denotes Divine truth, consequently the Word of the Lord, is manifest.
sRef Ezek@10 @5 S7′ sRef Ezek@3 @13 S7′ sRef Ezek@3 @12 S7′ [7] In Ezekiel:
The spirit lifted me up, and I heard behind me the voice of a great earthquake, saying, Blessed be the glory of Jehovah. And I heard the voice of the wings of the living creatures, and the voice of the wheels, even the voice of a great earthquake (Ezek. 3:12-13).
The voice of the wings of the cherubs was heard even to the outer court, as the voice of God Shaddai when He speaketh (Ezek. 10:5).
Here also “the voice” denotes Divine truth; for “the cherubs” signify the providence and guard of the Lord that there be no approach to Himself and to heaven except through the good of love (n. 9277, 9509); “the voice of the wings,” and “the voice of the wheels,” denote spiritual truths.
[8] In the present verse, in which Aaron is treated of, it is the sound or ringing from the bells which is called a “voice.” In other passages of the Word also sounds and blarings from trumpets, and sounds and peals from thunders, are called “voices;” and thereby in like manner are signified Divine truths (see n. 7573). Moreover, the sounds of musical instruments of various kinds have also a like signification; but those which give out a stridulous and a discrete sound signify Divine spiritual truths; while those which give out a continuous sound signify Divine celestial truths (n. 418-420, 4138, 8337). From this it is evident that by the sounds or “voices” of the bells are signified Divine spiritual truths; for the garments of Aaron, and specifically the robe, in the skirts of which were the bells, round about, represented the Lord’s spiritual kingdom or heaven (n. 9814, 9825).

AC (Potts) n. 9927 sRef Ex@28 @35 S0′ 9927. When he goeth in unto the holiness before Jehovah, and when he goeth out. That this signifies in every state of good and truth in worship, is evident from the signification of “going in unto the holiness,” and of “going in before Jehovah,” as being worship (of which above, n. 9903, 9907). That it is the state of good and truth in worship which is signified, is because all things of worship with the Israelitish and Jewish nation were representative of internal worship; and internal worship is from good and truth; that is, from the affection of good and from the faith of truth. That it is every state of these which is signified, is because it is said, “when he goeth in, and when he goeth out,” and by “going in and going out” are signified all the things of the state. For whatever belongs to motion, as “walking,” “going,” “advancing,” signifies a state of life. (That “walking” has this signification, see n. 519, 1794, 3335, 4882, 5493, 5605, 8417, 8420; in like manner “advancing,” and “journeying,” n. 8103, 8181, 8397, 8557; and that motions and progressions in the other life signify states, n. 1273-1277, 1376-1381, 2873, 3356, 9440.) From this it is evident that “going in and going out” denote everything of the state or thing that is being treated of; and as the subject here treated of is worship from good and truth, it is every state of good and truth in worship that is signified by “going in and going out.”
sRef 1Sam@29 @6 S2′ [2] This signification of “going in and going out” is from the representatives in the other life; for there they go, walk, advance, go in and out, just as in the world; but all these acts are done according to the state of the life of their thoughts and affections (as may be seen in the places above cited). That these acts also originate from their thoughts and affections, and are correspondences, and thus real appearances, they do not notice. From this it is evident that all things of motion signify those which belong to the state of life; consequently that “going in and going out” signify every state of life, thus the state of the thing that is being treated of, from beginning to end. It is from this that among the ancients it was a customary form of speaking to say that they knew a person’s coming in and his going out, or his entrance and his departure, when they meant that they knew every state of his life. And as this form of speaking originates from the correspondences in the other life, as has been already said, therefore in the Word also a like expression is made use of, and where this is done the like is signified; as in the following passages. In the first book of Samuel:
Achish called David, and said unto him, Thou art upright, and good in mine eyes is thy going out and thy coming in with me in the camp; for I have not found evil in thee (1 Sam. 29:6).
“Good in the eyes is thy going out and thy coming in” denotes that every state of his life was well-pleasing to him.
sRef 2Sam@3 @25 S3′ sRef Ps@121 @7 S3′ sRef Num@27 @17 S3′ sRef 2Ki@19 @27 S3′ sRef Ps@121 @8 S3′ sRef Num@27 @16 S3′ [3] In the second book of Samuel:
Thou knowest Abner, that he came to persuade thee, and to know thy going out and thy coming in, and to know all that thou doest (2 Sam. 3:25).
“To know the going out and the coming in” denotes to know all the thoughts and all the acts of the life; and therefore it is also said, “and to know all that thou doest.” In the second book of Kings:
I know thy sitting down, and thy going out and thy coming in, and that thou hast set thyself in motion against Me (2 Kings 19:27; Isa. 37:28);
where Sennacherib the king of Assyria is spoken of; “knowing his going out and his coming in” denotes all things of his counsel. In David:
Jehovah shall keep thee from all evil, He shall keep thy soul. Jehovah shall keep thy going out and thy coming in, from this time forth and even for evermore (Ps. 121:7, 8).
“To keep the going out and the coming in” denotes everything of the life according to the state of good and truth.
sRef John@10 @2 S4′ sRef John@10 @9 S4′ sRef John@10 @7 S4′ sRef John@10 @1 S4′ [4] In Moses:
Let Jehovah, the God of the spirits of all flesh, set a man over the assembly, who may go out before them, and who may come in before them, that the assembly of Jehovah be not as a flock that hath no shepherd (Num. 27:16, 17).
“Who may go out before them, and who may come in before them,” denotes one who may lead them; thus one whom they may look to and follow in every state of life. In John:
He that entereth not by the door into the sheepfold, but climbeth up some other way, the same is a thief and a robber. But he that entereth by the door is the shepherd of the sheep. I am the shepherd of the sheep; by Me if anyone enter in, he shall be saved, and shall go in and out, and shall find pasture (John 10:1, 2, 9).
“To enter in” (that is, into heaven), denotes into the good of love and faith, for this good makes heaven; and therefore “to go in and to go out,” denotes to be led by the Lord in respect to every state of life; consequently it denotes to think and will what is good from freedom, that is, from love and faith which are from the Lord, for these make freedom.
sRef Luke@9 @4 S5′ sRef Luke@9 @1 S5′ sRef Luke@9 @2 S5′ [5] In Luke:
Jesus sent the twelve disciples to preach the kingdom of God. And He said unto them, Into whatsoever house ye enter, there abide, and thence go out (Luke 9:2-4).
“To enter into a house,” “to abide there,” and “to go out thence,” denote to enjoy heavenly consociation with those who receive the Lord in faith and love; for in heaven those who are together in one society are also in one “house,” and they come in and go out there, because they are in a like good; but those who are in an unlike good cannot do so; and if they do enter in, they do not enter by the doors, but by some other way. He who does not know that such things are signified, cannot know what is involved in the words, that “into whatsoever house they should enter, they should there abide, and thence go out.”
sRef Ezek@46 @9 S6′ sRef Ezek@46 @10 S6′ sRef Ezek@46 @8 S6′ [6] In Ezekiel:
When the prince shall go in, he shall go in by the way of the porch of the gate, and he shall go out by the way thereof. When the people of the land shall go in before Jehovah in the appointed feasts, he that goeth in by the way of the north gate to worship shall go out by the way of the south gate; and he that goeth in by the way of the south gate shall go out by the way of the north gate; he shall not return by the way of the gate whereby he had gone in, but shall go straight before him. But when the prince goeth in in the midst of them, they shall go in; and when they shall go out, they shall go out (Ezek. 46:8-10).
In the internal sense a new heaven and a new church are here treated of; and by “the prince” is signified the truth of faith from the good of love. In what manner this truth enters in with angels in the heavens and with men of the church on earth, and how it afterward progresses toward the interiors when it has entered in by an external way, and toward the exteriors when it has entered by an internal way, is described by the going in and going out of the prince and of the people of the land. “The south” denotes the state of the truth of faith in the internal man; and “the north,” its state in the external man; “the going in and going out” denote the state of life as to good and truth, thus as to worship.
[7] From all this it can be known clearly enough that “to go in and go out” denote such things as belong to the state of life from good and truth; for otherwise what could it matter that the prince should go in by one way, or by another way? and also the people of the land? For by “the house” or temple there mentioned, into which there was entrance, and out of which there was going out, is signified heaven and the church (see n. 3720); by “the prince” is signified the truth of faith (n. 5044); by “the people of the land,” those who are in heaven, or who are of the church (n. 2928); by “the way,” that which leads to truth (n. 627, 2333); by a “gate,” doctrine (n. 2851, 3187); by “the south,” where truth is in light (n. 9642), thus truth in the internal man; and by “the north,” where truth is in obscurity (n. 3708), thus truth in the external man.

AC (Potts) n. 9928 sRef Ex@28 @35 S0′ 9928. That he die not. That this signifies that the representative does not perish, and therewith the conjunction with the heavens, is evident from the signification of “dying,” when said of Aaron and his office, as being the ceasing of the representatives, and consequently of conjunction with the heavens; for by Aaron was represented the Lord, and by his office the whole work of salvation, and on the part of man, worship. That this worship was representative, and that by means of representative worship there was conjunction with the heavens, has been abundantly shown. (See the places cited in n. 9320; also what was the representative of a church with the Israelitish and Jewish nation, n. 9280, 9457, 9481, 9576, 9577; and that the conjunction of the Lord and of heaven with man at that time was by means of representatives, n. 9481.) From this also it was that when Aaron was performing holy things he was clothed with garments that represented heavenly things; and that if he had done otherwise he would have died; especially if he had gone in to perform holy things without the knowledge of the people; for with the people there was the representative of a church, and with Aaron the representative of the Lord, from whom and toward whom is everything of worship.

AC (Potts) n. 9929 sRef Ex@28 @36 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @38 S0′ sRef Ex@28 @37 S0′ 9929. Verses 36-38. And thou shalt make a plate of pure gold, and engrave upon it with the engraving of a signet, Holiness to Jehovah. And thou shalt put it upon a thread of blue, and it shall be upon the miter; over against the faces of the miter shall it be. And it shall be upon Aaron’s forehead, and Aaron shall bear the iniquity of the holy things, which the sons of Israel shall sanctify, in respect to all the gifts of their holy things; and it shall be upon his forehead continually, to make them well-pleasing before Jehovah. “And thou shalt make a plate of pure gold,” signifies enlightenment from the Lord’s Divine good; “and engrave upon it with the engraving of a signet,” signifies what is perpetual and impressed on hearts according to the heavenly sphere; “Holiness to Jehovah,” signifies the Divine Human of the Lord, and from this all celestial and spiritual good; “and thou shalt put it upon a thread of blue,” signifies influx into the truth of celestial love; “and it shall be upon the miter,” signifies from infinite wisdom; “over against the faces of the miter it shall be,” signifies to eternity; “and it shall be upon Aaron’s forehead,” signifies from the Lord’s Divine love; “and Aaron shall bear the iniquity of the holy things,” signifies the consequent removal of falsities and evils with those who are in good; “which the sons of Israel shall sanctify, in respect to all the gifts of their holy things,” signifies acts of worship representative of removal from sins; “and it shall be upon Aaron’s forehead continually,” signifies a representative of the Lord’s love to eternity; “to make them well-pleasing before Jehovah,” signifies the Divine of the Lord in them.

AC (Potts) n. 9930 9930. And thou shalt make a plate of pure gold. That this signifies enlightenment from the Lord’s Divine good, is evident from the signification of “a plate,” as being enlightenment; and from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love, here the Lord’s Divine good, because there was inscribed upon it, “Holiness to Jehovah.” (That “gold” denotes the good of love, see n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917, 8932, 9490, 9510, 9874, 9881.) That “the plate” denotes enlightenment, was from its brightness, for it was resplendent from gold upon Aaron’s forehead, and all brightness signifies enlightenment such as is in the heavens from the Lord as the Sun. Enlightenment in the heavens is wisdom and intelligence from the Divine truth proceeding from the Lord from that Sun, for this enlightens their interiors. Their interiors correspond to the understanding with man, which is enlightened by the Lord when the truth and good of the church and heaven are perceived; for the understanding is the recipient subject; because without a subject there is no reception. That this “plate” denotes enlightenment from the Lord’s Divine good, is because upon it was inscribed “Holiness to Jehovah,” and it was placed upon the front of the miter, which was upon Aaron’s head. The “holiness” which is from Jehovah denotes the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good (n. 6788, 8302, 8330, 9229, 9680, 9820). In order that this plate might represent the shining forth, that is, the enlightenment, from which come wisdom and intelligence, it was bound on the forefront of the miter.
sRef Ex@39 @30 S2′ sRef Ex@29 @6 S2′ sRef Lev@8 @9 S2′ [2] As by “the plate” was signified enlightenment from the Lord’s Divine good, it was also called “the plate of the crown of holiness,” and likewise “the crown of holiness;” for a crown is a representative of Divine good, and “holiness” denotes the Divine truth thence proceeding, as was said above. That it was called “the plate of the crown of holiness,” is plain in what follows in this book of Exodus:
Lastly they made the plate of the crown of holiness of pure gold, and wrote upon it with the writing of the engravings of a signet, Holiness to Jehovah (Exod. 39:30).
That it was also called “the crown of holiness,” is evident from another passage in Exodus:
Thou shalt set the miter upon his head, and put the crown of holiness upon the miter (Exod. 29:6).
He set the miter upon his head; and upon the miter, opposite the faces of it, did he set the plate of gold, the crown of holiness (Lev. 8:9).
[3] That a crown represented Divine good from which is Divine truth, is evident from the crowns of kings; for kings represented the Lord in respect to Divine truth (see n. 2015, 2069, 3009, 4581, 4966, 5044, 5068, 6148); wherefore they had a crown on the head, and a scepter in the hand; for government from Divine good was represented by a crown, and government from Divine truth by a scepter.
sRef Ps@132 @18 S4′ sRef Ps@132 @17 S4′ [4] That a “crown” has this signification is evident from the following passages. In David:
I will make a horn to bud unto David; I will set in order a lamp for Mine anointed. His enemies will I clothe with shame; but upon Himself shall His crown flourish (Ps. 132:17, 18);
“David” here denotes the Lord (n. 1888), like the “anointed” (n. 3008, 3009); his “horn” denotes power (n. 2832, 9081); “a lamp” denotes the Divine truth from which is intelligence (n. 9548, 9783); the “crown” denotes the Divine good from which is wisdom, and from which is also His government; the crown, which denotes wisdom, is said “to flourish” because in respect to the Human He acquired wisdom in the world by means of combats against and victories over the hells (n. 9548, 9783), which are the “enemies that shall be clothed with shame.”
sRef Ps@89 @39 S5′ sRef Ps@89 @38 S5′ [5] Again:
Thou art angry with Thine anointed, Thou hast condemned His crown even to the earth (Ps. 89:38, 39);
where also “the anointed” denotes the Lord; “anger” denotes a state of temptations which existed when He was in combats with the hells; the lamentation at that time is described by “anger” and “condemnation;” as for instance the last lamentations of the Lord on the cross, that He was “forsaken;” for the cross was the last of the temptations, that is, of the combats with the hells; and after this last temptation He put on Divine good, and in this way united His Divine Human to the Divine Itself that was in Him.
sRef Isa@28 @5 S6′ [6] In Isaiah:
In that day shall Jehovah Zebaoth be for a crown of adornment, and for a diadem of comeliness, to the remains of His people (Isa. 28:5);
where “a crown of adornment” denotes the wisdom which is of good from the Divine; “a diadem of comeliness,” the intelligence of truth from this good; this is predicated of Divine things with the people; the “people” here denote the church, because it was there.
sRef Isa@62 @3 S7′ sRef Isa@62 @1 S7′ [7] In the same:
For Zion’s sake I will not be silent, and for Jerusalem’s sake I will not rest, until her righteousness go forth as brightness, and her salvation burn as a lamp; and thou shalt be a crown of comeliness in the hand of Jehovah, and a miter of the kingdom in the hand of thy God (Isa. 62:1, 3).
By “Zion” and “Jerusalem” is meant the church, by “Zion” the celestial church, and by “Jerusalem” the spiritual church thence derived; “a crown of comeliness” denotes the wisdom which is of good, and “a miter of the kingdom,” the intelligence which is of truth; and as by “a crown” is signified the wisdom which is of good, therefore it is said to be “in the hand of Jehovah;” and as by “a miter” is signified the intelligence which is of truth, therefore it is said to be “in the hand of God;” for where good is treated of, the name “Jehovah” is used, and where truth is treated of, the name “God” (n. 2586, 2769, 6905).
sRef Jer@13 @18 S8′ sRef Lam@5 @16 S8′ sRef Lam@5 @15 S8′ [8] In Jeremiah:
Say thou to the king and to the mistress, Renounce yourselves, sit down; for the adornment of your head is come down, even the crown of your comeliness (Jer. 13:18);
where “the crown of comeliness” denotes the wisdom which is of good from Divine truth, for “comeliness” denotes the Divine truth of the church (n. 9815). In the same:
The joy of our heart hath ceased; our dance is turned into mourning; the crown of our head is fallen (Lam. 5:15, 16).
“The crown of the head” denotes the wisdom which those who are of the church have from Divine truth, by virtue of which they are more excellent than the rest of the peoples, and hence have a kind of government.
sRef Ezek@16 @12 S9′ [9] In Ezekiel:
He put a jewel upon thy nose, and earrings in thine ears, and a crown of adornment upon thine head (Ezek. 16:12).
The subject here treated of is the setting up of the church; “a jewel upon the nose” denotes the perception of good; “earrings in the ears” denote the perception of truth, and obedience; “a crown upon the head” denotes the wisdom thence derived. In Job:
He hath stripped me of my glory, and taken away the crown of my head (Job 19:9);
where “glory” denotes the intelligence which is of Divine truth (n. 9429); “the crown of the head” denotes the wisdom thence derived.
sRef Rev@4 @4 S10′ sRef Rev@4 @10 S10′ [10] In Revelation:
Upon the thrones I saw four and twenty elders, clothed in white garments; who had upon their heads golden crowns. They fell down before Him that was sitting upon the throne, and worshiped Him that liveth forever and ever, and cast their crowns before the throne (Rev. 4:4, 10).
The “four and twenty elders” signify all those who are in good from truths, and in the abstract sense all goods from truths (n. 6524, 9404); the “thrones” denote truths from the Divine (n. 5313, 6397, 8625, 9039); the “golden crowns on their heads” are representatives of wisdom from the Divine, and because this is from the Divine, therefore they cast them before Him that was sitting upon the throne.
sRef Rev@6 @2 S11′ [11] As the good of wisdom is acquired by means of temptation combats, which are carried on by means of the truths of faith, therefore crowns were assigned to those who fought against evils and falsities and overcame; and for this reason also the crowns of martyrdom were badges of command from the Lord over evils. That “crowns” denote the rewards of victory over evils, and that for this reason they denote the goods of wisdom, because these are the rewards, is also evident from Revelation:
I saw, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon it had a bow; and there was given unto him a crown; and he went forth conquering, and to conquer (Rev. 6:2).
The “white horse and he that sat upon it” signify the Lord as to the Word (n. 2760-2762); “a bow” denotes the doctrine of truth, by means of which the combat is waged (n. 2686, 2709); from this it is evident that the “crown,” because said of the Lord, denotes the Divine good, which is the reward of victory.
sRef Rev@2 @10 S12′ sRef Rev@14 @14 S12′ sRef Rev@3 @11 S12′ [12] And in another passage:
Afterward I saw, and behold a white cloud; and upon the cloud one sitting like unto the Son of man, having upon his head a golden crown, and in his hand a sharp sickle (Rev. 14:14).
“A white cloud” denotes the literal sense of the Word (n. 4060, 4391, 5922, 6343, 6752, 8781); “the Son of man” denotes the Divine truth which is from the Lord (n. 9807); “a golden crown,” the Divine good from which is the Divine truth; “a sharp sickle” denotes the dispersing of evil and falsity. And again:
Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee the crown of life (Rev. 2:10).
Behold I come quickly; hold fast that which thou hast, that no one take thy crown (Rev. 3:11).
The “crown” denotes good from truths, thus wisdom; for this belongs to the good of love from the truths of faith. From all this it can now be seen what is signified by a “crown,” and what by “the crown of holiness,” which was the plate of gold on which was engraved “Holiness to Jehovah.”

AC (Potts) n. 9931 9931. And grave upon it with the engraving of a signet. That this signifies what is perpetual and impressed on hearts according to the heavenly sphere, is evident from the signification of “to engrave,” as being to impress on the memory (see n. 9841, 9842), thus also on the heart; for that which is impressed on the interior memory, which belongs to the life, is said to be “impressed on the heart,” and as this remains to eternity, it also signifies what is perpetual; and from the signification of “the engraving of a signet,” as being the heavenly sphere (n. 9846). The reason why it is said to be “impressed on hearts according to the heavenly sphere,” is that the things which have been impressed on the memory, especially on the interior memory, which is the book of life (see n. 2474), have been impressed according to the heavenly sphere; for a man who is in the good of love from the truths of faith resembles heaven, and moreover, is a heaven in the least form (see the places cited in n. 9279, 9632); thus in him there is the heavenly form; for all the societies in heaven have been set in order in accordance with the heavenly form, because all the affections of good and the consequent thoughts of truth flow in accordance with this form (n. 9877). (That when a man is in heavenly love all the memory-knowledges are arranged in the heavenly form, and that love so arranges them, see n. 6690.)

AC (Potts) n. 9932 9932. Holiness to Jehovah. That this signifies the Divine Human of the Lord, and from this all celestial and spiritual good, is evident from the signification of “holiness,” as being the Divine that proceeds from the Lord, thus as being the Lord Himself in respect to the Divine Human, from which is everything Divine in the heavens. It is from this that celestial good, which is the good of love to the Lord from the Lord; and spiritual good, which is the good of love toward the neighbor from the Lord, are holy. For the Lord alone is holy, and that which proceeds from Him is the only holiness in the heavens and on earth (see n. 9229, 9680, 9820). (That the holiness proceeding from the Lord is called “the Holy Spirit,” see n. 9818; and that angels, prophets, and apostles, are called “holy” from their reception of Divine truth from the Lord, n. 9820; and also that “the sanctuary” denotes heaven from the Divine there, n. 8330, 9479.) It is said, “Holiness to Jehovah,” because “Jehovah” in the Word denotes the Lord (see the places cited in n. 9373). The reason why “Holiness to Jehovah” was engraved on the plate of gold, and placed upon the miter upon Aaron’s forehead, was that in this way it was in the view of all the people, consequently there was holiness in their minds while they were in worship, and this holiness corresponded to the holiness that is in the universal heaven, which is the Divine Human of the Lord; for as before said this makes heaven. That which is in the general view of all the people, and which thereby reigns universally in their minds, enters into everything of thought and of affection, and consequently into everything of worship, and affects it (n. 6159, 6571, 7648, 8067, 8865); and therefore when this very great holiness was constantly before their eyes, and from this reigned universally in their minds, it made holy all things of worship.

AC (Potts) n. 9933 sRef Ex@28 @37 S0′ 9933. And thou shalt put it upon a thread of blue. That this signifies influx into the truth of celestial love, is evident from the signification of “blue,” as being the truth of celestial love (of which below). Influx into this truth is signified by the plate on which was engraved “Holiness to Jehovah” being put upon a thread of blue, for in this way it hung from it and was bound to it, and in the spiritual sense by “being bound to,” and “hanging,” is signified to inflow, because all conjunction whatever is effected by means of influx. That the influx is into the truth of celestial love about the Lord’s Divine Human, which is signified by “Holiness to Jehovah,” is because in that sphere of heaven where is the truth of celestial love, no other Divine is perceived than the Divine Human of the Lord.
[2] For the case herein is as follows. There are three heavens, which have been distinguished from one another by means of the degrees of good. In the inmost heaven is the good of celestial love, which is the good of love to the Lord; in the second or middle heaven is the good of spiritual love, which is the good of charity toward the neighbor; in the first or ultimate heaven is the good of natural love, from spiritual and from celestial love, which is the good of faith and obedience. In each heaven there is an internal and an external. As just said, the internal in the inmost heaven is the good of love to the Lord, and the external there is the good of mutual love, which belongs to the love of good for the sake of good. This good is what is meant by the truth of celestial love, which is signified by “the thread of blue.” In the sphere where is this truth, the Lord’s Human is perceived as being the Divine Itself in the heavens, and therefore as soon as an angel is raised into this sphere, he comes into this light also. This perception flows in from the Lord, because the Divine Human of the Lord makes heaven. This is the influx which is here signified. (That “blue” denotes the celestial love of truth, or what is the same thing, the truth of celestial love, see n. 9466, 9687, 9833.)

AC (Potts) n. 9934 sRef Ex@28 @37 S0′ 9934. And it shall be upon the miter. That this signifies from infinite wisdom, is evident from the signification of “the miter,” as being intelligence (see n. 9827); and when said with reference to the Lord, who was represented by Aaron, the “miter” denotes Divine or infinite wisdom.

AC (Potts) n. 9935 sRef Ex@28 @37 S0′ 9935. Over against the faces of the miter shall it be. That hereby is signified to eternity, is evident from the signification of “over against the faces of the miter,” when said of the Lord, who is represented by Aaron, as being to eternity (see n. 9888).

AC (Potts) n. 9936 sRef Ex@28 @38 S0′ 9936. And it shall be upon Aaron’s forehead. That this signifies from the Lord’s Divine love, is evident from the representation of Aaron, as being the Lord as to Divine good, which is the good of His Divine love (see n. 9806); and from the signification of “the forehead,” when it refers to the Lord, as being His Divine love; for by “the face of the Lord,” or what is the same, by “the face of Jehovah,” are signified all things of the Divine love; such as mercy, peace, good, wisdom (n. 222, 223, 5585, 6848, 6849, 9306, 9545, 9546). That “the face of Jehovah” or “the face of the Lord” has this signification, is because by “the face” in general are signified the interior things of man, which are his affections and the consequent thoughts, thus the things that belong to his love and faith (see the places cited in n. 9546). The reason why these things are signified by “the face,” is that they shine forth from the face as it were in their type or effigy; wherefore also the face is called the effigy of the mind. Hence it is that by “the face,” when said of Jehovah or the Lord, are signified the things which are of His Divine love. That by “the forehead” is specifically signified the Divine love itself, is because the interiors have been allotted their provinces in the face; those which are of love being in the province of the forehead; those which are of wisdom and intelligence being in the province of the eyes; those which are of perception being in the province of the nostrils; and those which are of utterance being in the province of the mouth. From this it is evident why “the forehead,” when said of the Lord, who is represented by Aaron, signifies the Divine love.
sRef Rev@14 @1 S2′ sRef Ezek@9 @4 S2′ sRef Ezek@9 @6 S2′ sRef Ezek@9 @5 S2′ sRef Rev@22 @4 S2′ [2] As the forehead with man corresponds to his love, therefore they who are in celestial love (that is, in love to the Lord from the Lord) are said to have “a mark on their foreheads,” by which is signified that they are under the Lord’s protection, because they are in His love, as in the following passages:
Jehovah said, Go through the midst of Jerusalem, and set a mark upon the foreheads of the men that groan and sigh for all the abominations that are done in the midst thereof; and smite; let not your eye spare; but come not near against any man upon whom is the mark (Ezek. 9:4-6).
Behold the Lamb standing on the Mount Zion, and with Him a hundred and forty and four thousand, having the name of His Father written on their foreheads (Rev. 14:1).
They shall see the faces of God and of the Lamb, and His name shall be on their foreheads (Rev. 22:4).
It was said that they should not hurt the grass of the earth, neither any green thing, nor any tree; but only the men that have not the mark of God on their foreheads (Rev. 9:4).
sRef Rev@9 @4 S3′ [3] “Having the mark,” or seal, “of God,” and “the name of God,” “on their foreheads,” denotes to be in safety from the infestation of evils which are from hell, because they are in the Lord through love; “the grass and the green thing,” which were not to be hurt, denote the memory-truth through which is the truth of faith (n. 7571, 7691); “the tree,” which also was not to be hurt, denotes the perception of truth from good (n. 103, 2163, 2722, 2972, 4552, 7692).
sRef Deut@6 @5 S4′ sRef Deut@6 @8 S4′ [4] In Moses:
Thou shalt love Jehovah thy God from all thine heart, and from all thy soul, and from all thy strengths. Thou shalt bind these words for a sign upon thy hand, and they shall be for frontlets between thine eyes (Deut. 6:5, 8).
“To be for frontlets” denotes for a sign of love to Jehovah God; it is said “between the eyes,” because “the eyes” signify the intelligence and wisdom which are from this love, and wisdom from this love is to have God continually before the eyes. That this is the meaning is evident, because love to Jehovah God is treated of. It is said that they should “love Him from all the heart, from all the soul, and from all the strengths,” by which is signified with all that is in man. “From the heart” denotes from the will in which is the good of love (n. 7542, 9050, 9300, 9495); “from the soul” denotes from the understanding in which is the truth of faith, thus from faith (n. 9050), which two are of the internal man; “from all the strengths” denotes from the things that belong to the understanding and the will in the external man. The strengths and power of the love of both the external and the internal man are signified by “the hands” (n. 4931-4937, 7518); and therefore it is said that “these words shall be bound for a sign upon the hand.”
sRef Rev@17 @5 S5′ sRef Rev@13 @16 S5′ [5] As by virtue of its correspondence “the forehead” signifies heavenly love with the good; so with the evil it signifies infernal love, which is opposite to heavenly love. The forehead of the latter is called a “brazen forehead” in Isaiah 48:4; and a “hardened forehead” in Ezekiel 3:7, 8; and of those who are in infernal love it is said that “they had the mark of the beast upon their foreheads” (Rev. 13:16; 14:9; 20:4); and also “the name of Babylon upon their foreheads” (Rev. 17:5).

AC (Potts) n. 9937 sRef Ex@28 @38 S0′ 9937. And Aaron shall bear the iniquity of the holy things. That this signifies the consequent removal of falsities and evils with those who are in good from the Lord, is evident from the representation of Aaron, as being the Lord in respect to the good of love (see n. 9806); and from the representation of the priesthood which Aaron administered, as being the whole office which the Lord discharges as the Savior (n. 9809); from the signification of “bearing iniquity,” as being the removal of falsities and evils with those who are in good (of which below); and from the signification of “the holy things,” as being the gifts which they brought to Jehovah or the Lord in order that their sins might be expiated, which gifts were burnt-offerings, sacrifices, and meat-offerings. That these things are meant by “the holy things,” is clear, for it is said, “which the sons of Israel shall sanctify in respect to all the gifts of their holy things.” That “bearing iniquity” denotes to remove falsities and evils, or sins, with those who are in good, is because it is said of the Lord, for the Lord was represented by Aaron, and the whole work of salvation was represented by the office, or priesthood, of Aaron. That it is said of the Lord that He “bore sins” for the human race, has been known in the church; but still it is not known what is meant by “bearing iniquities and sins.” It is believed by some that it denotes that He took on Himself the sins of the human race, and suffered Himself to be condemned even to the death of the cross; and that because the condemnation for sins was cast on Him, mortals were thus freed from damnation; and also that the damnation was taken away by the Lord through the fulfilling of the law, because the law would have condemned everyone who did not fulfil it.
[2] But these things are not meant by “bearing iniquity,” because every man’s deeds remain with him after death, and according to the quality of these he is then judged either to life or to death. Their quality is from his love and his faith, for love and faith make the life of a deed; and therefore they cannot be taken away by transfer to another who would bear them. From this it is evident that something else is meant by “bearing iniquities;” but what is meant can be seen from the bearing itself of iniquities or sins by the Lord. For the Lord bears them when He fights for man against the hells, because man cannot fight against these from himself; but the Lord alone does this, and indeed continually for every man, but with a difference according to his reception of the Divine good and Divine truth.
[3] When the Lord was in the world, He fought against all the hells, and completely subjugated them. From this He also became righteousness. Thus He redeemed from damnation those who receive the Divine good and truth from Him. Unless this had been done by the Lord, no man could have been saved; for insofar as the Lord does not remove them, the hells are constantly with man, and have dominion over him; and He removes them in proportion as the man desists from evils. He who once conquers the hells, conquers them to eternity; and in order that this might be done by the Lord, He made His Human Divine. He, therefore, who alone fights for man against the hells (or what is the same thing, against evils and falsities, for these are from the hells) is said “to bear sins,” for He alone supports this burden. That by “bearing sins” is also signified the removal of evils and falsities from those who are in good, is because this is the consequence; for insofar as the hells are removed from man, so far evils and falsities are removed, because as before said both of these are from the hells. Evils and falsities are “sins” and “iniquities.” How the case herein is can be seen from what was shown above (n. 9715, 9809), where the Lord’s merit and righteousness, and also the subjugation of the hells by Him are treated of.
[4] The reason why it is said of Aaron that he should “bear iniquities,” was that he represented the Lord, and his priesthood represented the Lord’s whole work of salvation (n. 9806, 9809); and the main work of salvation is to redeem and deliver man from the hells, and thus to remove evils and falsities. It is said to remove evils and falsities, because deliverance from sins (that is, the forgiveness of them) is nothing else than their removal; for they remain with the man; but insofar as the good of love and the truth of faith are implanted, so far the evil and falsity are removed. The case herein is like that with heaven and hell. Heaven does not abolish hell; but removes from itself those who are there. For it is the good and truth from the Lord which make heaven; and these are what effect this removal. The case is similar with man, who of himself is a hell; but when he is being regenerated, he becomes a heaven, and insofar as he becomes a heaven, so far hell is removed. It is a common opinion that evils, that is, sins, are not removed in this way; but are absolutely separated. But such persons are not aware that from himself the whole man is nothing but evil, and that insofar as he is kept in good by the Lord, the evils which belong to him appear as if they were rooted out; for when a man is kept in good, he is withheld from evil. Nevertheless no one can be withheld from evil and kept in good unless he is in the good of faith and of charity from the Lord; that is, only insofar as he suffers himself to be regenerated by the Lord. For as before said, heaven is implanted in man by regeneration, and thereby the hell which is with him is removed.
[5] From all this it can be seen again that “bearing iniquities,” when said of the Lord, denotes to continually fight for man against the hells, thus continually to remove them; for there is a perpetual removing, not only while man is in the world, but also in the other life to eternity. It is impossible for any man to remove evils in this way; for from himself man cannot remove the least of evil, still less the hells, and least of all to eternity. (But see what has been shown on this subject before, namely, that the evils with man are not absolutely separated; but are removed insofar as he is in this good from the Lord, n. 8393, 9014, 9333-9336, 9444-9454.) (That while He was in the World the Lord conquered the hells by means of the combats of temptations, and thereby disposed all things into order; and also that He did this from Divine love, in order to save the human race; and that thus He also made His Human Divine, may be seen in the places cited in n. 9528e; and also that in temptations, which are spiritual combats against the evils which are from hell, the Lord fights for man, n. 1692, 6574, 8159, 8172, 8175, 8176, 8273, 8969.) How the Lord while in the world bore the iniquities of the human race, that is, fought with the hells and subjugated them, and thus acquired for Himself the Divine power of removing these things with all who are in good, and thus became merit and righteousness, is described in Isaiah 59:16-20; 63:1-9, as has been already explained (n. 9715, 9809).
sRef Isa@53 @8 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @7 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @1 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @10 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @9 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @6 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @3 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @2 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @5 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @4 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @12 S6′ sRef Isa@53 @11 S6′ sRef Isa@63 @9 S6′ sRef Isa@63 @8 S6′ [6] When these things are understood, it can be known what is signified by all that is said in the fifty-third chapter of the same prophet concerning the Lord, in which from beginning to end the state of His temptations is treated of; thus the state in which He was while He fought with the hells, for temptations are nothing else than combats with these. This state is thus described:
He bore our sicknesses, and carried our griefs; He was pierced for our transgressions, and bruised for our iniquities; Jehovah made to fall on Him the iniquity of us all; and thus He gave the wicked to their sepulcher; the will of Jehovah shall prosper by His hand; He shall see from the labor of His soul and be sated; and by His wisdom shall justify many, because He hath borne their iniquities, and thus hath carried the sin of many (Isa. 53:4-5).
He is also called there “the Arm of Jehovah,” by which is signified Divine power (n. 4932, 7205). That by “bearing sicknesses,” “sorrows,” and “iniquities,” and by “being pierced and bruised by them,” is signified a state of temptations, is evident; for in such a state there are griefs of soul, distresses, and despairs, which in this way cause anguish. Such things are induced by the hells, for in temptations they assault the very love of him against whom they fight; the love of everyone being the inmost of his life. The Lord’s love was the love of saving the human race, which love was the Esse of His life, for this love was the Divine in Him. In Isaiah also, where the subject treated of is the combats of the Lord, this is described in these words:
He said, Surely they are My people, therefore He became their Savior. In all their distress He was distressed; in His love and in His pity He redeemed them; and He took them up, and carried them all the days of eternity (Isa. 63:8, 9).
sRef John@12 @30 S7′ sRef John@12 @28 S7′ sRef John@12 @27 S7′ sRef John@12 @31 S7′ sRef Isa@53 @7 S7′ [7] That while He was in the world the Lord endured such temptations, is only briefly described in the Gospels, but at great length in the prophets, and especially in the Psalms of David. In the Gospels it is only said that He was led into the wilderness, and was afterward tempted by the devil, and that He was there forty days, and was with the beasts (Mark 1:12, 13; Matt. 4:1). But that from His earliest childhood even to the end of His life in the world He was in temptations, that is, in combats with the hells, He did not reveal, in accordance with these words in Isaiah:
He was oppressed, and was afflicted, yet He opened not His mouth; He is led as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, He opened not His mouth (Isa. 53:7).
His last temptation was in Gethsemane (Matt. 26; Mark 14), and then came the passion of the cross; that He thereby fully subjugated the hells, He Himself teaches in John:
Father, rescue Me from this hour. But for this sake came I into this hour. Father, glorify Thy name. Then came there a voice out of heaven, saying, I have glorified it and will glorify it. Then said Jesus, Now is the judgment of this world; now shall the prince of this world be cast out (John 12:27, 28, 31).
“The prince of the world” is the devil, thus all hell; “to glorify” denotes to make the human Divine. The reason why mention is made only of the temptation after forty days in the wilderness, is that “forty days” signify and involve temptations to the full, thus the temptations of many years (n. 8098, 9437); “the wilderness” signifies hell, and “the beasts with which He fought there” signify the diabolical crew.
sRef Lev@16 @22 S8′ sRef Lev@16 @21 S8′ [8] The removal of sins with those who are in good, that is, those who have practiced repentance, was represented in the Jewish Church by the he-goat called “Asasel,” upon the head of which Aaron was to lay his hands, and to confess the iniquities of the sons of Israel, and all their transgressions in respect to all their sins, and was then to send it into the wilderness, and that in this way the he-goat should bear upon him all their iniquities into a land of separation (Lev. 16:21, 22). By Aaron is here represented the Lord; by “the he-goat” is signified faith; by “the wilderness,” and “the land of separation,” hell; and by “bearing thither the iniquities of the sons of Israel” is signified to remove them, and cast them into hell. No one can know that such things were represented, except from the internal sense; for everyone can see that the iniquities of a whole congregation could not be borne into the wilderness by any he-goat; for what had the he-goat in common with iniquities? But as at that time all representatives signified such things as belong to the Lord, to heaven and to the church, so also did these. The internal sense therefore teaches what these things involve, namely, that it is the truth of faith by means of which man is regenerated, consequently by means of which sins are removed; and because the faith of truth is from the Lord, it is the Lord Himself who effects this; according to what was said and shown in the preface to Genesis 22, and also in n. 3332, 3876, 3877, 4738. (That Aaron represents the Lord, see n. 9806, 9810; also that a “he-goat of the goats” denotes the truth of faith, n. 4169, 4769.) That “the wilderness” denotes hell, is because the camp in which were the sons of Israel signified heaven (n. 4236); and therefore the wilderness is called a “land of separation,” or of “cutting off.” Thus by “bearing iniquities into that land,” that is into the wilderness, is signified to cast evils and falsities into hell, from which they are; and they are cast thither when they are removed so as not to appear, which is effected when a man is withheld from them by being kept in good by the Lord, according to what was said above.
sRef Micah@7 @19 S9′ [9] The like that was signified by the casting out of sins into the wilderness is signified by “casting them forth into the depths of the sea,” as in Micah:
He will have compassion upon us; He will suppress our iniquities; and He will cast all their sins into the depths of the sea (Micah 7:19).
“The depth of the sea” also denotes hell.
sRef Num@18 @1 S10′ sRef Num@18 @22 S10′ sRef Num@18 @23 S10′ sRef Isa@46 @4 S10′ sRef Isa@46 @3 S10′ [10] From all this it is now evident that by “Aaron bearing the iniquities of the holy things,” is signified the removal of sins by the Lord from those who are in good; and that their removal is continually being effected by the Lord; and that this is meant by “bearing iniquities.” So also in another passage in Moses:
Jehovah said unto Aaron, Thou and thy sons with thee shall hear the iniquity of the sanctuary; and thou and thy sons with thee shall bear the iniquity of your priesthood. The sons of Israel shall no more come nigh the Tent of meeting, to bear sin, by dying. But the Levite shall do the work of the Tent, and they shall bear their iniquity (Num. 18:1, 22, 23).
The like is meant by “bearing,” in Isaiah:
Attend unto Me O house of Israel that have been carried from the womb. Even to old age I am the same, and even to hoar hairs will I carry; I have made, and I will carry; yea, I will bear, and will rescue (Isa. 46:3, 4).
sRef Lev@4 @31 S11′ sRef Lev@10 @16 S11′ sRef Lev@4 @35 S11′ sRef Lev@4 @26 S11′ sRef Lev@10 @17 S11′ [11] That “bearing iniquity” denotes to expiate, thus to remove sins, is evident in Moses:
Moses was indignant with Eleazar and with Ithamar because the he-goat of the sacrifice of sin had been burnt, saying, Wherefore did ye not eat it in the place of holiness, seeing that Jehovah hath given it you to bear the iniquities of the congregation, to expiate them before Jehovah (Lev. 10:16, 17)?
(That “expiation” means a cleansing from evils, thus removal from sins, see n. 9506; and that Aaron was enjoined to expiate the people, and to pardon their sins, Leviticus 4:26, 31, 35; 5:6, 10, 13, 16, 18; 9:7; 15:15, 30.) That “to bear sins,” when not said of the priesthood, denotes to be damned, thus to die, see Leviticus 5:1, 17; 7:18; 17:16; 19:8; 20:17, 19, 20; 22:9; 24:15; Numbers 9:13; 18:22; Ezekiel 18:19, 20; 23:49.

AC (Potts) n. 9938 sRef Ex@28 @38 S0′ 9938. Which the sons of Israel shall sanctify in respect to all the gifts of their holy things. That this signifies acts of worship representative of removal from sins, is evident from the signification of “gifts” or “offerings,” which among the Israelitish and Jewish nation were chiefly burnt-offerings, sacrifices, and meat-offerings, as being the interior things of worship, for these were what they represented. The interior things of worship are those which are of love and faith, and from this forgivenesses of sins, that is, removals from them, because sins are removed through faith and love from the Lord. For insofar as the good of love and of faith enters, or what is the same thing, so far as heaven enters, so far sins are removed, that is, so far hell is removed, both that which is within man, and that which is without him. From this it is evident what is meant by “the gifts which they sanctified,” that is, offered. The gifts were called “holy,” and presenting or offering them was called “sanctifying” them, because they represented holy things; for they were offered for expiations, thus for removals from sins, which are effected through faith and love to the Lord from the Lord.
[2] They were called “gifts and offerings made to Jehovah,” although Jehovah, that is, the Lord, does not accept any gifts or offerings, but gives to everyone freely. Nevertheless He wills that these things should come from man as from himself, provided he acknowledges that they are not from himself, but from the Lord. For the Lord imparts the affection of doing good from love, and the affection of speaking truth from faith; but the affection itself flows in from the Lord, and it appears as if it were in the man, thus from the man; for whatever a man does from the affection which is of love, he does from his life, because love is the life of everyone. From this it is evident that what are called “gifts and offerings made to the Lord” by man are in their essence gifts and offerings made to man by the Lord; and their being called “gifts and offerings” is from the appearance. All who are wise in heart see this appearance; but not so the simple; and yet the gifts and offerings of the latter are grateful, insofar as they are offered from ignorance in which is innocence. Innocence is the good of love to God, and dwells in ignorance, especially with the wise in heart; for they who are wise in heart know and perceive that there is nothing of wisdom in themselves from themselves; but that everything of wisdom is from the Lord, that is, everything of the good of love, and everything of the truth of faith; thus that even with the wise innocence dwells in ignorance. From this it is evident that the acknowledgment of this fact, and especially the perception of it, is the innocence of wisdom.
[3] The gifts that were offered in the Jewish Church, and which were chiefly burnt-offerings, sacrifices, and meat-offerings, were also called “expiations from sins,” because they were offered for the sake of the forgivenesses of them, that is, removals from them. Those who belonged to that church also believed that their sins were accordingly forgiven; nay, that they were entirely taken away; for it is said that after they had offered these things they would be “forgiven” (see Lev. 4:26, 31, 35; 5:6, 10, 13, 16, 18; 9:7, 15, 30). But they did not know that these offerings represented interior things, thus such things as are done by man from the love and faith that are from the Lord; and that these are the things which expiate, that is, remove sins, and that after they have been removed they appear as if they were quite removed or taken away, as has been shown above in this and in the preceding articles. For that nation was in representative worship, thus in external worship without internal, by means of which there was at that time a conjunction of heaven with man. (See the places cited in n. 9320e, 9380.)

AC (Potts) n. 9939 sRef Ex@28 @38 S0′ 9939. And it shall be upon Aaron’s forehead continually. That this signifies a representative of the Lord’s love to eternity, is evident from the signification of “the forehead,” as being love (see n. 9936); from the representation of Aaron, as being the Lord (n. 9806); and from the signification of “continually,” as being to eternity. That “continually” denotes to eternity, is because all things that belong to time, when said of the Lord, signify eternal things; therefore also “continually.” For “continually,” “daily,” and “always,” are predicated of time. From this also it is that “yesterday,” and “today,” when said of the Lord, likewise signify that which is eternal (n. 2838).

AC (Potts) n. 9940 sRef Ex@28 @38 S0′ 9940. To make them well-pleasing before Jehovah. That this signifies what is Divine of the Lord in them, is evident from the signification of “well-pleasing,” when said of Jehovah, that is, the Lord, as being from His Divine, for that which is well-pleasing to the Lord is that which is from Him with man, spirit, or angel; for it is then in another, in whom it is looked at, and thus is well-pleasing. The things which are from the Lord are either nearer to, or more remote from Him; and they are said to be “from His will,” “from good pleasure,” “from leave,” and “from permission.” The things which are from will are most nearly from Him; those which are from good pleasure are somewhat more remotely from Him; those which are from leave still more remotely; and those which are from permission are most remotely from Him. These are the degrees of the influx and reception of the Divine. But each degree contains innumerable things which are distinct from those which are in any other degree; and these innumerable things are arcana of heaven, a few only of which fall into the human understanding. For instance, to take only those things which take place from permission, which, although they are in the last place, nevertheless on account of the numberless arcana therein cause a man to fall into confusion when he looks at them from the happenings of things in nature, and from appearances, and still more when from the fallacies of the senses. Yet the arcana of permission are comparatively few as compared with those of the higher degrees, which are the things that take place from leave, from good pleasure, and from will.

AC (Potts) n. 9941 sRef Ex@28 @38 S0′ 9941. Verses 39, 40. And thou shalt checker the tunic of fine linen, and thou shalt make a miter of fine linen, and a belt thou shalt make with the work of the embroiderer. And for Aaron’s sons thou shalt make tunics, and thou shalt make for them belts; and tiaras shalt thou make for them, for glory and for comeliness. “And thou shalt checker the tunic of fine linen,” signifies the inmost things of the spiritual kingdom that proceed from the truths of celestial love; “and thou shalt make a miter of fine linen,” signifies the wisdom there; “and a belt,” signifies a bond, and separation from the external things of this kingdom; “thou shalt make with the work of the embroiderer,” signifies by means of the knowledges of good and truth; “and for Aaron’s sons,” signifies the Divine truths that proceed from the Lord’s Divine good in the heavens; “thou shalt make tunics,” signifies the things which are of faith there; “and thou shalt make for them belts,” signifies a holding together in connection; “and tiaras shalt thou make for them,” signifies the intelligence there; “for glory and for comeliness,” signifies the truth of the spiritual church.

AC (Potts) n. 9942 sRef Ex@28 @39 S0′ 9942. And thou shalt checker the tunic of fine linen. That this signifies the inmost things of the spiritual kingdom that proceed from the truths of celestial love, is evident from the signification of Aaron’s garments in general, as being the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom (see n. 9814), and as the tunic was the inmost of these garments, therefore by it are signified the inmost things of this kingdom (that “Aaron’s tunic” denotes the Divine truth in the spiritual kingdom that proceeds immediately from the Divine celestial, see n. 9826); and from the signification of “fine linen,” as being truth from a celestial origin (see n. 9469). Of this tunic it is said that it was to be checkered, and by what is checkered is meant the work of a weaver, and by “the work of a weaver” is signified that which is from the celestial (n. 9915); the word by which “checkering” is expressed in the original tongue, means also “weaving.”
sRef Ex@39 @27 S2′ [2] That this tunic was woven, or from the work of the weaver, is evident from what follows in the book of Exodus:
They made tunics of fine linen, the work of the weaver, for Aaron and his sons (Exod. 39:27).
That it was checkered, that is, woven, of fine linen, was for the reason that there might be represented that which proceeds immediately from the celestial, which is relatively as it were continuous; for the things which proceed from the celestial are like those which with man proceed from his will; for all things with man that belong to the understanding proceed from his will. Those things which proceed interiorly from the will are as it were continuous relatively to those which proceed exteriorly; and therefore among those things which proceed interiorly from the will there is especially the affection of truth; for all the affection of love in the understanding flows in from the man’s will. The case is similar in the heavens, where the celestial kingdom corresponds to the will of man, and the spiritual kingdom to his understanding (see n. 9835); and because the garments of Aaron represented the Lord’s spiritual kingdom joined to His celestial kingdom (n. 9814), therefore the tunic represented that which is inmost there, thus that which proceeds most closely from the celestial kingdom, for the tunic was the inmost garment. From this it is evident why the tunic was woven or checkered, and why it was of fine linen; for by “that which is woven” is signified that which is from the will, or from the celestial (n. 9915), and by “fine linen” is signified the truth which is from celestial love (n. 9469).
[3] The spiritual which is from the celestial is also signified in other parts of the Word by “tunics,” as by “the tunics of skin” which Jehovah God is said to have made for the man and his wife after they had eaten of the tree of knowledge (Gen. 3:20, 21). That by these “tunics” is signified truth from a celestial origin, cannot be known unless these things are unfolded according to the internal sense; and therefore this shall be unfolded. By the man and his wife is there meant the celestial church, by the man himself as a husband is meant this church as to good, and by his wife this church as to truth. This truth and that good were the truth and good of the celestial church. But when this church had fallen, which took place by means of reasonings from memory-knowledges about truths Divine, and which is signified in the internal sense by the persuasion of the serpent, this first state after the fall of that celestial church is what is there described, and its truth is described by “the tunics of skin.”
[4] Be it known that by the creation of heaven and earth in the first chapter of Genesis, in the internal sense, is meant and described the new creation, or regeneration, of the man of the church at that time, thus the setting up of a celestial church; and that by the paradise are meant and described the wisdom and intelligence of that church, and by eating of the tree of knowledge its fall in consequence of reasoning from memory-knowledges about Divine things. That such is the meaning may be seen from what has been shown on this subject in the explications at those chapters. For all the things contained in the first chapters of Genesis are made up historical things, in the internal sense of which, as before said, are Divine things concerning the new creation or regeneration of the man of the celestial church. This method of writing was customary in the most ancient times, not only among those who were of the church, but also among those who were outside the church, as among the Arabians, Syrians, and Greeks, as is evident from the books of those times, both sacred and profane.
[5] In imitation of these books, because derived from them, the Song of Songs was written by Solomon; for this book is not a holy book, because it does not contain within it heavenly and Divine things in a series, as do the holy books. The book of Job also is a book of the Ancient Church. Mention is also made of holy books of the Ancient Church which are now lost, as in Moses (Num. 21:14, 15, 27, and following verses). The historical parts of these books were called “the Wars of Jehovah,” and their prophetical parts were called “the Enunciations” (see n. 2686, 2897). That in the historical parts of the books called “the Wars of Jehovah,” the style was of this nature, is clear from what has been taken from them and quoted by Moses. In this way their historical things approached a certain prophetic style, of such a nature that the things might be retained in the memory by little children and also by the simple. That the books named above were holy, is evident from what is quoted in verses 28, 29, and 30 of the same chapter, when compared with what is found in Jeremiah 48:45, 46, where there are similar expressions. That among people outside the church such a style was very much used at that time, and was almost the only style, is clear from the fables of those writers who were outside the church, in which they wrapped up moral things, or such as belong to the affections and life.
sRef Gen@37 @31 S6′ sRef Gen@37 @23 S6′ sRef Gen@37 @32 S6′ sRef Gen@37 @33 S6′ [6] In the historical things that were not made up, but were true, such as are those in the books of Moses after the first chapters of Genesis, and likewise in the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings, “tunics” also signified spiritual truth, and the good of truth, that proceed from celestial truth and good. (Be it known that spiritual truth and good are such as are the truth and good of the angels in the middle or second heaven; but that celestial truth and good are such as are the truth and good of the angels in the third or inmost heaven, see the places cited in n. 9277.) It is recorded in the books of Moses that Israel the father gave to Joseph his son a tunic of various colors, and that on account of this his brethren were indignant, and afterward stripped it off and dipped it in blood and sent it so to their father (Gen. 37:3, 23, 31-33). These were true historicals, and as these in like manner contained within them, or in the internal sense, holy things of heaven and the church, thus Divine things, therefore by that “tunic of various colors” was signified the state of good and truth which Joseph represented, which was a state of spiritual truth and good that proceed from the celestial (see n. 3971, 4286, 4592, 4963, 5249, 5307, 5584, 5869, 5877, 6417, 6526, 9671). For all the sons of Jacob represented in their order such things as belong to heaven and the church (n. 3858, 3926, 4060, 4603, 6335, 6337, 6397, 6640, 7836, 7891, 7996); but in this case they represented the opposite things.
sRef John@19 @24 S7′ sRef Ps@45 @9 S7′ sRef John@19 @23 S7′ [7] As all things contained in the books of the Word, both the historical and prophetical, are representative and significative of Divine celestial and spiritual things, therefore the affection of this truth is described by the “king’s daughter,” and the truth itself by her “garments,” in David:
The king’s daughter is among Thy precious ones; at Thy right hand doth stand the queen in the best gold of Ophir. The daughter of Tyre shall bring an offering; the rich of the people shall entreat Thy faces. The king’s daughter is all glorious within; thy* clothing (thy* tunic) is of weavings (or checkering) of gold. She shall be brought to the king in broidered work (Ps. 45:9, 12-14).
(That a “daughter” in general signifies the affection of spiritual truth and good, thus also the church, see n. 2362, 3024, 3963, 9055e; and that a “king,” when said of the Lord, signifies Divine truth, n. 2015, 2069, 3009, 4581, 4966, 5068, 6148.) From this it is evident that all those things which are related in this psalm about the king’s daughter signify such things as belong to the affection of truth and good from the Lord in the church. Its being said that “the daughter of Tyre shall bring an offering,” signifies the knowledges of good and truth (that “Tyre” signifies these, see n. 1201); in like manner “the rich of the people,” for by “riches” in the spiritual sense nothing else is meant than the knowledges of good and truth (n. 1694, 4508). From this it is evident what is signified by “the king’s daughter being glorious within,” and that “her clothing was of the weavings of gold;” for by her “clothing” is meant a tunic, as is evident from the signification of this word in the original tongue, where it signifies the garment next the body. That it means a tunic is evident in John 19:23, 24, where the Lord’s tunic is described, which in David (Ps. 22:18) is called, by the same word, “clothing.” So in the second book of Samuel (13:18), it is said that the king’s daughters were clad in tunics of divers colors (of which below). By “the weavings of gold” in David the like is meant as by “the checkerings of the tunic of Aaron,” the same word being used in the original tongue. (What is meant by the “broidered work” in which she was to be brought to the king, see n. 9688.)
sRef 2Sam@13 @18 S8′ [8] As such things were represented by the king’s daughter and by her garment, or tunic, therefore a king’s daughters were at that time clothed in this manner, as is evident in the second book of Samuel:
There was upon Tamar a tunic of divers colors; for with such wraps were the king’s daughters clothed (2 Sam. 13:18).
sRef Lev@10 @2 S9′ sRef Lev@10 @5 S9′ sRef Lev@10 @4 S9′ sRef Lev@10 @1 S9′ sRef Lev@10 @3 S9′ [9] Now as spiritual goods and truths were represented by tunics, it can be seen what is signified by “Aaron’s tunic,” also what by “the tunics of his sons,” which are spoken of in the following verse of the present chapter, where it is said that “for Aaron’s sons they should make tunics, belts, and tiaras, for glory and for comeliness.” And as their tunics represented these holy things, it was said that Nadab and Abihu the sons of Aaron, who were burnt by fire from heaven, because they offered incense from strange fire, were brought forth outside the camp in their tunics (Lev. 10:1-5); for by “strange fire” is signified love from some other source than what is celestial, for in the Word “holy fire” denotes celestial or Divine love (n. 6832, 6834, 6849, 7324, 9434). Consequently the spiritual goods and truths signified by their “tunics” were defiled, and therefore they were brought forth outside the camp in their tunics.
sRef Micah@2 @8 S10′ [10] The like is also signified by “tunic” in Micah:
My people holds as an enemy by reason of a garment; ye strip the tunic from off them that pass by securely (Micah 2:8);
in this passage “tunic” is expressed in the original tongue by another word, which, however, signifies spiritual truth and good; “stripping the tunic from off them that pass by securely” denotes to deprive of their spiritual truths those who live in simple good; “to hold anyone as an enemy by reason of a garment” denotes to do evil to them on account of the truth which they think, when yet no one is to be injured on account of what he believes to be true, provided he is in good (n. 1798, 1799, 1834, 1844).
sRef Matt@5 @36 S11′ sRef Matt@5 @37 S11′ sRef Matt@5 @40 S11′ sRef Matt@5 @35 S11′ sRef Matt@5 @34 S11′ [11] From all this it can now be seen what is signified by a “tunic” in Matthew:
Jesus said, Swear not at all; neither by the heaven, nor by the earth, nor by Jerusalem, nor by the head. Let your discourse be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay. Whatsoever is beyond these is from evil. If any man would drag thee to the law, and take away thy tunic, let him have thy cloak also (Matt. 5:34-37, 40).
he who does not know what is the state of the angels in the Lord’s celestial kingdom, cannot possibly know what these words of the Lord involve; for the subject here treated of is the state of good and truth with those who are in the Lord’s celestial kingdom, with whom all truth is imprinted on the heart. For from the good of love to the Lord they know all truth, insomuch that they never reason about it, as is done in the spiritual kingdom; and therefore when truths are being spoken of, they only say, Yea, yea, or Nay, nay; and they do not even mention faith there. (Concerning their state see the places cited in n. 9277.) From this then it is evident what is signified by the injunction “swear not at all;” for by “swearing” is signified to confirm truths (n. 3375, 9166), which is done in the spiritual kingdom by means of the rational, and memory-knowledges from the Word. By “dragging to the law, and desiring to take away the tunic,” is meant to debate about truths, and to wish to persuade that they are not true; a “tunic” denotes truth from what is celestial; for the celestial leave to everyone his truth without further reasoning.
sRef Matt@10 @7 S12′ sRef Matt@10 @10 S12′ sRef Matt@10 @5 S12′ sRef Matt@10 @9 S12′ [12] By a “tunic” is signified the truth from what is celestial in another passage also in Matthew:
Jesus sent the twelve to preach the kingdom of the heavens, saying that they should not possess gold, nor silver, nor brass in their girdles; nor a scrip for the journey; neither two tunics, nor shoes, nor staves (Matt. 10:5, 7, 9, 10).
By these words was represented that those who are in goods and truths from the Lord possess nothing of good and truth from themselves, but that they have all truth and good from the Lord. For by the twelve disciples were represented all who are in goods and truths from the Lord, and in the abstract sense all goods of love and truths of faith from the Lord (n. 3488, 3858, 6397). Goods and truths from self, and not from the Lord, are signified by “possessing gold, silver, and brass in the girdles,” and by a “scrip;” but truths and goods from the Lord are signified by “a tunic, shoe, and staff;” by “the tunic,” interior truth, or truth from the celestial; by “the shoe,” exterior truth, or truth in the natural (n. 1748, 6844); and by “the staff,” the power of truth (n. 4876, 4936, 6947, 7011, 7026). But by “two tunics,” “two pairs of shoes,” and “two staves,” are signified truths and their powers from both the Lord and self. That they were allowed to have one tunic, one pair of shoes, and one staff, is evident in Mark 6:8, 9, and in Luke 9:2, 3.
sRef John@19 @24 S13′ sRef John@19 @23 S13′ [13] When it is known from these examples what is signified by a “tunic,” it is manifest what is signified by “the Lord’s tunic,” of which we read in John:
They took the garments, and made four parts, to every soldier a part, and the tunic; and the tunic was without seam, woven from the top throughout. They said, Let us not divide it, but cast lots for it, whose it shall be; that the Scripture might be fulfilled which saith, They divided My garments among them, and upon My tunic did they cast a lot. These things the soldiers did (John 19:23, 24; also Ps. 22:18).
Who cannot see, if he thinks from reason at all enlightened, that these proceedings signified Divine things, and that otherwise they would not have been foretold by David? But what they signify cannot be known without the internal sense, thus without knowledge therefrom as to what is signified by “garments;” by “casting lots” upon, or “dividing” them; by a “tunic;” and by its being “without seam,” that is, woven throughout; and by “soldiers.” From the internal sense it is plain that by “garments” are signified truths, and by “the Lord’s garments,” Divine truths; by “casting a lot,” and “dividing” them is meant to pull these truths asunder and disperse them (n. 9093); by the “tunic” is signified Divine spiritual truth from the Divine celestial, the like as by “Aaron’s tunic,” because Aaron represented the Lord; so also by its being “without seam,” and “woven from the top throughout,” the like is signified as by the “checkered,” or woven, “work,” in Aaron’s tunic. That the tunic was not divided signified that the Divine spiritual truth which proceeds most nearly from Divine celestial truth could not be dispersed, because this truth is the internal truth of the Word, such as is with the angels in heaven.
[14] Its being said that “the soldiers did this,” signifies that it was done by those who should fight for truths, thus by the Jews themselves, with whom was the Word, and who nevertheless were of such a nature that they dispersed it. For they had the Word, and yet they were not willing to know from it that the Lord was the Messiah and the Son of God who was to come, nor anything internal of the Word, but only what is external; which they also wrested to their loves, which were the loves of self and of the world, thus to favor the lusts which spring from these loves. These things were signified by “the dividing of the Lord’s garments;” for whatever they did to the Lord represented the state of Divine truth and Divine good among them at that time; thus that they treated Divine truths in the same way as they treated Him. (That the Lord while in the world was the Divine truth itself, see the places cited in n. 9199, 9315.)
* Here “thy,” but “her” in n. 3081 and 5044. [REVISER]

AC (Potts) n. 9943 sRef Ex@28 @39 S0′ 9943. And thou shalt make a miter of fine linen. That this signifies the wisdom there, is evident from the signification of “a miter,” as being intelligence, and when said of the Lord, who is here represented by Aaron, as being wisdom (see n. 9827); and from the signification of “fine linen,” as being truth from a celestial origin (n. 9469); for the wisdom which is here signified by “the miter” comes from this truth. For all wisdom and intelligence are from the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good. There are no other wisdom and intelligence that really are such, because there are none from any other source. Intelligence is to know and understand truths Divine, and afterward to have faith in them; and wisdom is to will and love these truths, and from this to live according to them.

AC (Potts) n. 9944 sRef Ex@28 @39 S0′ 9944. And a belt. That this signifies a bond, and separation from the external things of this kingdom, is evident from the signification of “a belt,” as being the external bond that holds together all things of love and faith in their connection and form, so that they look to one end (see n. 9341, 9828, 9837). That it also signifies separation from the external things, is because in this way it gathers up and holds together the internal things, and that which gathers up and holds together the internal things, also separates them from the external things. The internal things of the spiritual kingdom are signified by “the tunic,” because this was the inmost clothing, and its external things are signified by “the robe,” and “the ephod,” because these were the outer garments. (That by the garments of Aaron was represented the spiritual kingdom, see n. 9814; by the ephod its external, n. 9824; by the robe its interior, n. 9825; and by the tunic the inmost, n. 9826.)

AC (Potts) n. 9945 sRef Ex@28 @39 S0′ 9945. Thou shalt make with the work of the embroiderer. That this signifies by means of the knowledges of good and truth, is evident from the signification of “the work of the embroiderer,” as being that which is from memory-knowledges (see n. 9688). It is said “by means of the knowledges of good and truth,” because by these knowledges are meant interior memory-knowledges such as are those of the church concerning faith and love. That these memory-knowledges are here signified by “the work of the embroiderer,” is because by “the belt” of the tunic, which was of the work of the embroiderer, is signified the inmost bond of the spiritual kingdom (of which just above); and because all things in the spiritual world are held together in connection by means of knowledges, and the affections thence derived.

AC (Potts) n. 9946 sRef Ex@28 @40 S0′ 9946. And for Aaron’s sons. That this signifies the Divine truths that proceed from the Lord’s Divine good in the heavens, is evident from the representation of the sons of Aaron, as being the Divine truths that proceed from the Lord’s Divine good (see n. 9807). That “in the heavens” is signified, is because what is Divine of the Lord in the heavens is that which is represented by the priesthood of Aaron and his sons; Divine good in the heavens by the priesthood of Aaron, and Divine truth from Divine good there by the priesthood of his sons. It is said “in the heavens,” because the Lord Himself is above the heavens, for He is the Sun of heaven; and yet His presence is in the heavens, and is as if He Himself were there. He Himself in the heavens, that is, His Divine good and His Divine truth there, can be represented; but not His Divine which is above the heavens, for the reason that the latter cannot fall into human minds, and not even into angelic minds, because it is infinite; but the Divine in the heavens which is from it, is accommodated to reception.

AC (Potts) n. 9947 sRef Ex@28 @40 S0′ 9947. Thou shalt make tunics. That this signifies the things which are of faith there, is evident from the signification of a “tunic,” when said of Aaron, as being Divine truth inmostly in the spiritual kingdom, thus that which proceeds immediately from the celestial (see n. 9826, 9942); but when it is said of Aaron’s sons, the “tunic” denotes that which is of faith, for it denotes that which proceeds from the spiritual which is from the celestial. This proceeding is what is called “the faith of truth.”

AC (Potts) n. 9948 sRef Ex@28 @40 S0′ 9948. And thou shalt make for them belts. That this signifies a holding together in connection, is evident from the signification of “belts,” as being external bonds which hold together in connection the truths and goods of faith and love (see n. 9341, 9828, 9837, 9944).

AC (Potts) n. 9949 sRef Ex@28 @40 S0′ 9949. And tiaras shalt thou make for them. That this signifies the intelligence there, is evident from the signification of a “miter,” and in general of a covering for the head, as being intelligence and wisdom (see n. 9827); consequently also a “tiara;” for the covering of the head for the sons of Aaron was called a “tiara.”

AC (Potts) n. 9950 sRef Ex@28 @40 S0′ 9950. For glory and for comeliness. That this signifies the truth of the spiritual church, is evident from the signification of “for glory and for comeliness,” as being to present, in an internal and an external form, Divine truth such as it is in the spiritual kingdom joined to the celestial kingdom (see above, n. 9815); but here it denotes the truth of the spiritual church which is thence derived; for by Aaron is represented Divine good in the heavens, and by his sons the Divine truth thence derived. Moreover, the Divine good there is as a father, and the Divine Truth from it is as a son; and because this is so, by “father” in the Word is signified good, and by “sons” truths. And indeed truths are born from goods when the man is being born anew, that is, when he is being regenerated.

AC (Potts) n. 9951 sRef Ex@28 @41 S0′ 9951. Verse 41. And thou shall put them on Aaron thy brother, and on his sons with him; and shalt anoint them, and fill their hand, and shalt sanctify them, and they shall minister to Me in the priest’s office. “And thou shalt put them on Aaron thy brother,” signifies such a state of Divine good in the spiritual kingdom; “and on his sons with him,” signifies such a state there in the external things proceeding therefrom; “and shalt anoint them,” signifies a representative of the Lord as to the good of love; “and fill their hand,” signifies a representative of the Lord as to the truth of faith; “and shalt sanctify them,” signifies thus a representative of the Lord as to the Divine Human; “and they shall minister to Me in the priest’s office,” signifies a representative of the Lord in respect to the whole work of salvation from the Divine Human.

AC (Potts) n. 9952 sRef Ex@28 @41 S0′ 9952. And thou shalt put them on Aaron thy brother. That this signifies such a state of Divine good in the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the signification of “to put on,” as being to induce the state of the thing which is represented by the garments, here the state of Divine truth in the spiritual kingdom; for by Aaron is represented the Lord as to Divine good, and therefore also the Divine good which is from the Lord (see n. 9806); and by his garments is represented the Lord’s spiritual kingdom joined to His celestial kingdom (n. 9814). That by “to put on” is signified to induce the state which is represented by the garments that are put on, originates in the representatives in the other life. The spirits there, and the angels, all appear clothed in garments, each one according to the state of truth in which he is, thus each one according to his understanding that corresponds to the will which is in him. The reason of this is that the understanding in man clothes his will; and the understanding is formed of truths, and the will of goods; and good is what is clothed (n. 5248). It is from this that “garments” in the Word signify truths (see n. 165, 1073, 4545, 4763, 5954, 6378, 6914, 6918, 9093, 9814); and that this has its origin from the representatives in the other life, see n. 9212, 9216, 9814.

AC (Potts) n. 9953 sRef Ex@28 @41 S0′ 9953. And on his sons with him. That this signifie